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Full text of "Sub turri = Under the tower : the yearbook of Boston College"

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rensics the class of 1985 
strove to achieve the 
Boston College motto, 
"Ever to Excell." The 
1985 graduates met this 
challenge with unpar- 
alleled style and grace. 
Finesse ruled every 
situation whether aca- 
demic or extra curricu- 
lar. Where ever their en- 
deavors led them the 
class of 1985 glittered. 






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Table of Contents 


Boston 


16 


Sports 


50 


Student Life 


130 


Activities 


194 


Academics 


230 


Seniors 


260 








Peter Klidaras 



2 / Opening 



Peter Klidaras 



Opening/ 3 






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oston College has been an 
important institution in the lives of 
Boston families for over 100 years. And 
BC continues to play a significant role 
in the social, political, and economic 
life of the city. I salute the class of 
1985 and wish them every success." 

Mayor Raymond L. Flynn 



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* Boston College athletic 
program is alive and exciting, thirty 
varsity sports and 2,000 involved in the 
recreation in the sports complex each 
day. Thanks and congratulations to 
one of the most loyal and supportive 
student bodies in the country." 

Bill Flynn, Athletic Director 



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Alison Brooks 



Opening / 7 



here is no national Institution 
greater than the dignity of the 
student." 

Fr. Hanrahan, Dean of Students 




Deirdre Reidy 




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Opening / 9 



process of active 
involvement is as important as the 
product it creates, because within 
that process one can transfer and 
apply the skills learned beyond the 
college experience. Extracurricular 
activity provides a learning laboratory 
to test out one's values, goals and 
abilities." 

Carole Wegman, Director OSPAR 



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Opening / 11 



— oston College's main 
responsibility is to provide its students 
with an excellent education, both 
inside and outside the classroom. A 
talented and dedicated faculty 
working together with a gifted and 
responsive student body have helped 
(BC) to respond to that challenge very 
well. I hope the members of the class 
of 1985 will always support BC's 
commitment to academic 
excellence." 

Joseph R. Fahey, S.J., 
Academic Vice President 




Ed Wolfe 



. oston College blossomed in our 
four short years into one of the most 
prominent and influential Universities in 
the nation. Our class helped uniquely 
by giving BC a football egend, 
significant changes in extracurricular 
activities, and higher academic 
standards. We take with us a 
well-rounded education, solid 
friendships, and memories of our time 
here that will last forever." 

Jeff Theilman, President UGBC 



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16 / Boston 









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Boston 



Boston / 17 



i city of tradition, this diverse 
town strives to recognize all forms 
of culture and intellect. 

For Boston 



In 1636 when Harvard was founded 
Boston was already a major port of call. 
In the late 1700s, when John Adams and 
Co. were agitating for home-rule, Bos- 
ton was an affluent merchant communi- 
ty. When Turner turned out his thesis on 
Manifest Destiny and other educated 
men spoke of the great American ex- 
periment—the melting pot of European 
cultures, Boston was a cauldron at full 
boil. What was this city in 1985? The 
Athens of the new world? An actively 
political town where freedom and hu- 
man rights were still defended? A Yich 
mosaic' of cultural pride and diversi- 
fication? 

The answer was yes. The Boston we 
knew as students was and would always 
be the manifestation of the original 
American ideal — Freedom: Freedom 
to pursue the most excellent education 
a brilliant mind deserved; Freedom to 
be free, to have a say in government, to 
worship in whatever fashion one's con- 
science led, to enjoy culture, sports, the 
benefits of hard work; And freedom to 
revel in being uniquely American — ttal- 
ian-American, Irish-American, 
Chinese-American, Bristish-American, 
Polish-American, the list was unending. 

Boston was not, however, the Came- 



lot of the east. It had had racial prob- 
lems, political muckraking and under- 
handedness. Where else could a man 
like Jake Curly have been elected 
mayor while serving time in prison? 
Hadn't the news clips of Boston police 
breaking up riots nearly become a high 
school subject? It was common to see 
an indigent picking through a trash can 
in search of food while a seemingly in- 
different crowd of well dressed, well fed 
people hurried off to the Gardner 
Museum or the Top of the Hub. No one 
talked about the Combat Zone. A cab- 
by would only go there if he had a revolv- 
er in the glove compartment. But these 
problems did not dominate the city's 
lifestyle. Concerned Bostonians actively 
waged war on these abuses and injus- 
tices. The Salvation Army ran soup kitch- 
ens where a hungry person could get a 
meal and talk to an understanding, 
concerned listener. Whomever was run- 
ning for mayor at the time swore to 
clean up the city and sometimes the 
promise lived through the elections. Bos- 
ton was one of the few cities where a 
black mayoral candidate like Mel King 
could lead a "Rainbow coalition" of 
people from all racial origins in a close 
mayoral race even though demo- 



graphically the city was predominantly 
white. 

Boston's unique flavor came from a 
fine blend of seasonings from the North 
End washed down with a Guiness stout 
from the South end. Boston's classy taste 
was enjoyed by the precocious Harvard 
freshman who seemingly lived in the 
MFA, the BC student who went early to 
get good seats at the Symphony shell, 
and by the MIT researcher who denied 
herself a night on the town to be able to 
volunteer at the Children's Hospital. Bos- 
ton's liveliness got out of hand now and 
then at the Garden cheering on the Celt- 
ics. Its intensity would not be quieted at 

rallies and fund raisers. 

The final view of Boston was perhaps 
best seen from the Heights at BC. There 
was no better city to live in while at col- 
lege. Seniors looked at the old Hancock 
building reflected in the Hancock sky- 
scraper and saw there not only the 
cultural heritage of a great city but how 
it had completed our education, mak- 
ing us citizens of Boston and, in a larger 
sense, of the free world. 

— T.H. McMorran & Colleen Seibert 

Fourth of July celebration, 1984, Photo by 
Makls latridls 



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Boston / 19 



Who Needs A Car? 




Staff Photo 



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"Exact change please" . . . "no dollar 
bills" . . . 'tokens only" . . . "RED line. 
BLUE line, GREEN line . . . B-line, C-line, 
D-line ..." 

All of these terms were associated 
with the trolley or "T", Boston's infamous 
transit system. Not.only did this system 
provide a means of transportation, it 
was also the source of more humor than 
any comedy club in Boston. After a few 
years at B.C. every student knew at least 
one good "T" tale. 

The emotional requirements for riding 
the T" were rather simple. One needed 
to have a very good sense of humor, an 
"anything goes" attitude, and the men- 
tal preparation to encounter a variety of 
strange people and events. For some 
unknown reason the trolley ride was like 
a full moon — there always seemed to 
be an element of lunacy in the air. 

The types of people riding the "T" 
ranged from small children enroute to 
school, to a tired businessman on his 
way home from the office, to the woman 
whose life's possessions were carried in 
a few large shopping bags. Then there 
were the "zanies" such as one young 
man who was observed carving his ini- 
tials onto the back of his hand while he 
was waiting for a train at Park Street 
Station. One came to expect the unex- 



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pected. 

There were a number of amusing 
events that happened on the "T". For 
example, one December, a gentleman 
got on the "T" with a case of beer under 
his arm. He announced that it was his job 
to make sure that everyone on that train 
was happy. At this point he handed out 
cans of beer to the passengers and in- 
vited all to sing Christmas carols with 
him. Another occurrence took place in 
the Copley Station when a man in an 
old overcoat set up a washtub string 
guitar and broke out in strains of "Some 
Enchanted Evening". 

There were certain things that simply 
had to be accepted when setting out 
for a ride on the trolley. 

The "T" wanted would invariably be 
the "T" which just pulled away. If the D 
line was desired it was a certainty that it 
would come only after half a dozen C 
and B trains rattled by. Daring to take 
the "T" during rush hour, required stami- 
na. Learning to be squeezed, jostled 
and shoved against complete strangers 
became a necessity. Remember also 
that people who were not yet on the 
train firmly believed that there was al- 
ways room for one more. 

— Gretchen Popagoda 



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20 / Boston 





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Staff Photo 
Who needs a car? The pass above could get one anywhere: To 
Washington Station, out from Kenmore, or rushing to who knows 
where. 






Boston / 21 



Northeastern had Huntington street, 
was anyone jealous? Boston University 
had Kenmore square, did anyone 
care? Emerson had . . . where did they 
keep Emerson anyway? But, BC, BC had 
the place of honor among colleges in 
Boston. BC had Chestnut Hill. 

Chestnut Hill was a fairytale town with 
the grass always being greener on its 
side. It was a suburban neighborhood. 
But since Boston College was on the bor- 
der between the city of Boston and the 
suburb of Newton, it derived benefits 
from both the large metropolitan city 
and the residential suburb. 

The residential suburb of Newton was 
located about one mile from the col- 
lege's main campus. Newton was a 
marvelously ritzy, elite, little neighbor- 
hood. Just driving or walking along 
Commonwealth Ave. from BC toward 
Newton, it was easy to notice the typical 
New England houses. The ivy palaces of 
Newton was made of warm, red brick or 
perhaps laid out in a Tudor style. 

The Newton Campus of Boston Col- 
lege was a big part of this classy com- 
munity. The students who lived on the 
campus had an opportunity to interact 



with Newton's residents on a personal 
and educational level, whether it be 
babysitting for a local family or learning 
management at one of Newton Cen- 
ter's quaint shops. 

In addition to Boston College students 
interacting with residential Newton, BC 
also benefited from Boston itself. "The 
Circle" was just one of the more popular 
locations for off campus residents to live 
during their year of off campus housing. 
Many students rented an apartment in 
Cleveland Circle with three or four of 
their friends. It was a circle of public 
facilities, such as movie theaters, a park, 
stores and a mass transportation center 
surrounded by purley Bostonian apart- 
ment houses complete with baywin- 
dows and fireplaces. 

Boston College's domination of the 
"Hill" provided BC students with much 
more than a good view of the city. 
Chestnut Hill embodied a "Camelot" for 
coeds during their four undergraduate 
years. The coeds in turn would be loyal 
and true to it and their alma mater in the 
years to come. 

— Theresa Holtman 



Clockwise from top left: An aerial shot of a 
Boston neighborhood ; one of the magnificent 
houses along Commonwealth Ave.; a shot of 
Cleveland Circle; the splendor of the Chest- 
nut Hill Mall. 




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22 / Boston 



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Boston / 23 



Cooped Up 



Just across the Charles River from Bos- 
ton was Cambridge. It had a definite 
character of its own. Harvard and MIT 
contributed to the atmosphere of edu- 
cation that pervaded the area, but the 
abundance of intellect was not the only 
guality that distinguished Cambridge 
from its surroundings. Sometimes the city 
seemed trapped in a time warp, a ref- 
uge for left-over flower children, but at 
the same time it was at the vanguard in 
diverse areas as technology and social 
issues. It was an area full of free spirits, 
each contributing his or her own views to 
form a composite which made Cam- 
bridge liberal, experimental, intellectu- 
al, and eccentric all at the same time. 

Harvard Sauare represented the core 
of Cambridge, and the heart of the 
square was Harvard University. With an 
academic tradition that dated back to 
1636, Harvard was the pinnacle of elite 
American education. It was amazingly 
private considering the city that sur- 
rounded it, but the bookstore that 



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served Harvard was a mecca for any- 
one who wants to purchase anything 
from a micro-computer to a deck of 
cards. If an apartment or dorm room 
was looking a little barren, the 'Coop' 
was the place to go for all decorating 
needs. With all the diverse articles in the 
Coop', it was sometimes hard to re- 
member that it was a bookstore. 

If the 'Coop' didn't have what was 
wanted, the neighborhood stores did, 
Urban Outfitters carried Esprit clothes, 
weaved mats, and kitchen utensils. The 
Garage, right down the street, counted 
Newbury Comics and a specialty cof- 
fee shop among its boutiques. Specialty 
shops, many of them selling the ever 
popular ice cream, were places at 
which people congregated. Two out- 
door magazine stands sold everything 
from the most recent Paris Match to 
Pravda, the official newspaper of the 
Soviet Union. 

Harvard Square offered free enter- 
tainment outside during the evening. 




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The entrances to the 'Coop" offered 
great acoustics to all sorts of musicians 
and their audiences. Leaflets advertis- 
ing everything from cults to shoes to so- 
cial issues were handed to the crowds 
heading by. Some headed for off-beat 
movie houses in the area like The Orson 
Welles and the Brattle Street Theater. 

Cambridge was not defined by Har- 
vard Square alone. It was also the Hyatt 
with The Spinnakar restaurant and Cen- 
tral Square. The Inn's Sauare Men's Bar 
showcased some of the best local 
bands in intimate, surroundings. With 
such diversity and uniqueness, Cam- 
bridge continued to be a place which 
was included on many people's itinerar- 
ies long after graduation. 

— Laura Swain 



Clockwise from right: a crow toam sculls 
along the Charles River; sailors take advan- 
tage of a summer breeze; a patch of green 
on Harvard Square; the gates of Harvard 
Yard 



John Boswell 
24 / Boston 





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Boston / 25 



Specialty of the Day 



Every once in a while there came the 
time when food at the dining hall just 
didn't make the grade. Or a quick 
search in the refrigerator to find some 
leftover macaroni and cheese only re- 
sulted in a half stick of margarine and a 
box of Arm and Hammer Baking Soda. 
That was the time to eat out . . . 

Luckily, Boston offered a wide variety 
of culinary delights ranging from the 
good old hearty pizza pie to the elo- 
quent creations presented by the more 
sophisticated establishments around 
town. No matter what the occasion was 



there was always some restaurant which 
would fulfill your needs. 

Faneuil Hall always ranked highly on 
the list of favorite restaurants. Here at the 
food hall you had the possibility of eat- 
ing every course of your meal at a differ- 
ent place. For starters who could resist 
the stuffed spinach & cheese 
mushrooms as a quick appetizer? And 
for the health food addicts there was 
always the fresh fruit salads. The difficult 
part was deciding what to choose for 
your main course. Inevitably, some par- 
ticular aroma would successfully entice 




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you into purchasing more food. 

Who could forget No Names? Talk 
about generic no frills dining! The in- 
teresting aspect was that its simplicity 
actually enhanced its wonderful non- 
sensical atmosphere. It always helped 
to eat some snack before you left home 
because the chances were high that 
you would be standing in a line which 
started yards outside the front door, 
wound up and down a set of stairs, 
around a pole and overto the reception 
desk before you could see the tables. 
Yet no one ever seemed to mind the 
wait because by the time you were 
almost seated, you and your friends had 
polished off the case of beer you had 
brought along to drink with dinner. As a 
matter of fact you were just beginning to 
help the group behind you finish their 
bottle of wine when the hostess was pull- 
ing you into the dining room. "Whaaat 
. . . dinnertime already??!" 

Top favorites in the ethnic foods in- 
cluded the North End's prize winning 
European Restaurant and the Mexican 
Guadalaharry's. If Oriental food was 
more your dish Aku-Aku or the Hong- 
Kong were the places to visit . . . without 
forgetting to bring your picture-ID. 

What about those nights when Ched- 
dar cheese and sour cream potato skins 
(with bacon bits) seemed a little too 
high for your daily calorie requirement? 
Well, thats when Souper Salad always 
wove its way into every disciplined diet- 
ers heart. 

Every once in awhile your date was so 
special that he or she made 33 Dunster 
St seem like Wendy's. That was the time 
to put on your fancy outfits and enter the 
elegant dining atmosphere offered at 
Union Oyster House or the Charthouse. 
The magical air was just the touch to 
make that lasting romantic impression 
on your date. 

Inevitably, in the course of your dining 
history at Boston College, you soon dis- 
covered that not only did Boston's res- 
taurants offer great food, they contrib- 
uted to some very fond memories as 
well. 

— Tania Zielinski 



26 / Boston 






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Clockwise from below: one of 
the many Oriental restaurants In 
the area; a favorite hangout In 
Cleveland Circle; an outdoor 
cafe along Newbury Street; Fri- 
days could be enjoyed seven 
nights a week. 



Boston / 27 



American Heritage 



Like any other large city, Boston had 
its own ethnic sections such as the North 
End, the South End and Chinatown. To 
an outsider, these areas might have 
suggested a segregation of sub- 
cultures. However, unlike any other large 
city was Boston's enormous student pop- 
ulation, bringing with it fresh, open- 
minded enthusiasm. For those of us who 
had the opportunity to explore Boston 
over our years here, we knew that our 
city was not composed of isolated sub- 
cultures, but instead was a blend of var- 
ious sub-cultures, inviting all to partici- 
pate. 

To observe the influence of this 
melange, one needed only to struggle 
through the crowded food halls of 
Fanueil Hall. Here the olfactory nerves 
were bombarded by the aromas that 
drifted from various stalls advertising 
their ethnic cuisine. If a relaxed sit-down 
dinner was your preference, there were 
several restaurants in the immediate 
vicinity to choose from — a la francaise 
at the Magic Pan or 'south of the border' 
to Guadalaharry's. 

If immerson was sought, the Italian 



North End was only a stones throw from 
the Marketplace. There local residents 
would converse heatedly in their native 
tongue while coeds sipped their cap- 
puccino in the Cafe Paradiso. Strolling 
through the streets while a feast took 
place was an experience in itself. Natur- 
ally the word Italian connotates visions 
of delectable specialties ranging from 
canneloni to canoli! 

The Asian influence was not central- 
ized in the peep-show district of China- 
town. The Hong Kong in Cambridge and 
Aku-Aku in Back Bay were often fre- 
quented by students from all over Bos- 
ton. After a couple of the infamous Scor- 
pion Bowls whether the restaurant was in 
Boston or China became blurred. 

Last but far from least was the Irish 
population in Boston which constituted 
the largest ethnic group in the city. Even 
without a drop of Irish blood, there was 
always that one day out of the year that 
fell somewhere in the middle of March. 
For B.C. students, St. Patrick's Day im- 
plied a self proclaimed holiday (or for 
those more dedicated students, a half 
day of classes) that begun at noon and 




lasted until the wee hours of the morn'. 
Droves of students flocked to the famous 
establishments such as The Purple 
Shamrock and the Black Rose. The most 
heart-warming aspect of the event was 
that singing, laughing, and dancing in 
the bars were people of all ethnic back- 
grounds as well as Irish, enjoying it just 
the same: this was the real advantage 
to the blending of ethnic cultures in 
Boston. 

— Maureen McNicholl 







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28 / Boston 




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Drieittal, Irish, Black and Italian groups are among the many 
Who have found a haven in Boston. Frederick Douglas, a black 
abolitionist, Is pictured In a mural, above. 




Makis latridis 



Boston / 29 



Cash or Charge? 



chickens or no, the new checkbook 
needed some breaking in. 
But then senior year rolled around and 



shave] and you casually told your room- knew the location of four CVS' four 



Remember the first time you were in 
Boston and living away from home? The 
first time you realized that you were run- 



face the reality that the real world was 
quickly approaching. 

Fortunately, Boston offered a number 
of different stores for the variety of tastes 
it had. Thus shopping in town served a 
dual purpose of fulfilling the needs of the 



tions showed us that there is life beyond 



ton was a pleasure, an adventure, a 



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as deadly as CVS? 



won't do. The RA had mentioned s< 



"coop" but they were probably so 
cheap because you had to go to a 
chicken coop to get them. Oh well. 



shop over in Cambridge and from then 
on in it was downhill until mom started 
buying suits senior year forcing you to 



— Tania Zielinski 




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30 / Boston 



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vendors In Faneull Hall 
promoted BC; one of the 
chic Newbury Street bou- 
tiques; fresh fruit for less at" 
Park St. 




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Boston / 31 



Events that shaped 
the world as well 
as our daily lives 



Boston was a city of ever-changing 
tides and waves. New winners and los- 
ers, delights and tragedies, improve- 
ments and demolitions were making 
their mark on the city. The municiple 
events of the past four years had a major 
effect on Boston and the schools it 
hosted. Below are some of the most im- 
portant happenings between Septem- 
ber, 1981 and May, 1985. 

Sports On June 12, 1984, the Boston 
Celtics won their fifteenth National Bas- 
ketball Association Championship 
against the L.A. Lakers. The score was 
111-102. Larry Bird was named Most Valu- 
able Player of the seven game series. 

The Celtics started the 1984 season 
with a new coach and a new owner but 
they proved that their talents could over- 
come these obstacles. Mayor Ray Flynn 
congratulated the team, saying their 
victory "symbolizes the new spirit of 
Boston." 

Boston Red Sox fans witnessed the 
end of an era as Carl Yastrzemski retired 
from baseball on October 2, 1983. Yaz 
had played for 23 years, in 3,303 
games, which is the most ever played in 
the majors. He was 44 years old. 

Yastrzemski finished out his career as 
the designated hitter/pinch hitter for the 
Red Sox. He was best known for winning 
the "Triple Crown" in 1967 with the top 
average (.326), most runs batted in (121) 
and most home runs (44) for that year. 

Politics A new mayor of Boston was 
elected in 1983. On November 15th, 
Raymond L. Flynn had a 66%-34% win 
over Melvin H. King. King was the first 
black to become a Boston mayoral 
finalist in the city's history. The election 
marked a major shift in Boston politics. 
Former mayor Kevin White's sixteen 



years in office ended, as did his style of 
governing. 

Both Flynn and King followed very per- 
sonal campaigns; pledging support for 
better housing, improved jobs, educa- 
tion and neighborhood renovation. 
White had emphasized downtown de- 
velopment of hotels and office build- 
ings. The two candidates each spent 
about $400,000 on their campaigns, in 
contrast to White's $2 million average. 
Mel King's nomination in the primary 
was a turning point in Boston politics. It 
brought a sense of relief from the racial 
strife and the problems in the ethnic 
neighborhood that have plagued the 
city for the last twenty years. Flynn 
accepted his nomination with the prom- 
ise to work for the kind of people he 
came from. He was the first Boston 
mayor to be a native of South Boston. 

Accidents On January 23, 1982, a 
World Airway DC-10 landed at Logan 
Airport about 1000 feet beyond the nor- 
mal landing point, ran off the runway, 
and slid into Boston Harbor. The acci- 
dent occured at about 7:45 PM in icy 
conditions. An Air Florida plane had 
crashed into the Potomac River only 
eleven days earlier. 

Two passengers, seated in the nose 
section that broke off the plane, were 
never found and were presumed dead. 
No fatalities were known until three days 
after the accident because the flight 
passenger list contained only 196 peo- 
ple and all were accounted for. 

New openings A stunning example 
of Boston's explosive commercial 
growth was officially opened in April of 
1984. The Copley Place, a 3.7 million 
square foot group of buildings, housed 
two hotels, four office buildings, 100 



apartments, a movie theatre and over 
100 shops and restaurants. The atmo- 
sphere was definitely high-class, with 
stores such as Neiman-Marcus, Tiffany's 
and Godiva Chocolates opening their 
doors onto a mall filled with marble, sky- 
lights and a waterfall. 

Crime Four men were found guilty 
and two more were acquitted in the Big 
Dan rape trial of March, 1984. In March 
of 1983, a woman claimed she had 
been gang raped on a pool table in the 
Big Dan Tavern in New Bedford, Mass. 
while onlookers cheered. 

The trial was historical because it was 
the first to be carried live on cable televi- 
sion and radio. The victim's name was 
revealed on the Today show, breaking 
the precedence of privacy in earlier 
rape cases. Another scandal sur- 
rounded the verdict, as Portuguese- 
American groups protested that the de- 
fenders were treated unfairly because 
of local prejudice against Portuguese. 
The four men found guilty of aggra- 
vated rape faced a sentence of six to 
ten years in prison. 

Religion Bernard F. Law became the 
eighth Archbishop of Boston on March 
23, 1984. He was appointed by Pope 
John Paul II to take the place of Humber- 
to Cardinal Medeiros who died the pre- 
vious September. Law was from a dio- 
cese in Missouri and was known for his 
ecumenical stance. The 52-year-old 
priest was appointed to a city of 2 mil- 
lion Roman Catholics, the third largest in 
the country. The installation coincided 
with that of John J. O'Connor as 
Archbishop of New York City. 

— Colleen Seibert 

The new Copley Place 



32 / Boston 




Alison B 



Boston / 33 



The audiences of the Performing Arts 
of Boston enjoyed the best of two worlds. 
They had access to the tours of high 
caliber dance, theater, and musical tal- 
ents while their city was called home by 
diverse entertainers, some of whom 
were world famous themselves. 

Boston's most enduring musical export 
was the Boston Pops. The orchestra first 
received national recognition under the 
direction of Arthur Fiedler. Through re- 
cordings and public television, the Pops 
performances were enjoyed by many 
people who could not have seen them 
at home in Boston. The traditional free 
concerts on the Charles were continued 
by the Pops under the direction of John 
Williams of "The Star Wars Theme" fame. 

There was a variety of ways to enjoy 
the classical Performing Arts in Boston. 
Enjoying the local talent of the Boston 
Ballet Company under the tremendous- 
ly talented Sarah Caldwell, or waiting 
for the Boston performances of artists like 
flutist James Galway, and soprano Kiri 
Te Kanawa were just a few. 

Boston was not a place for touring 
artists to simply perform. Sometimes, the 
city's reaction to the performance is 
used as a barometer by which Broad- 
way bound plays are measured. Tom- 



my Tune's "My One and Only" made its 
trial run here, but only after alterations 
had been made did the musical move 
on to a successful run in New York. 

Boston had a tradition of theater that 
was quite separate from New York. The 
Boston Shakespeare Company pro- 
duced plays ranging from Dostoevsky's 
"Uncles Dream" to "Richard III". The 
American Repertory Theater and local 
university theaters like Harvard's Hasty 
Pudding Club Theatricals and BC's own 
Dramatics Society could employ cre- 
ative license where large scale produc- 
tions in New York could not. 

Boston also had its share of long run- 
ning plays. Shear Madness enjoyed a 
very long run in Beantown. Active audi- 
ence participation had become a part 
of Boston Theater. The Improvboston, 
and the defunct Mobius relied on audi- 
ence response for the direction of the 
play. 

On-the-spot improvisation was not li- 
mited to the theaters. It played an im- 
portant role in the Bostom comedy as 
well. Clubs like the Comedy Connection 
and Nick's Comedy Stop had opened 
in response to the demand to see good, 
stand-up comics. Some bars like Play it 
Again Sam's had their own comedy 



nights. The Paradise was once exclu- 
sively a music club, but it had added 
Stitches as a comedy section with posi- 
tive results. 

Live performances of popular music 
had a home in Boston. Big name bands 
could be seen at the cavernous Boston 
Garden, at the converted theater that 
was the Orpheum, or at the Channel. 
During the summer the Boston Com- 
mons was the site of large scale con- 
certs by such bands as the Eurythmics, 
the Go-Go's, and Huey Lewis. Smaller 
clubs like the Inn's Square Men's Bar in 
Cambridge and The Rat in Kenmore 
Square hosted bands anxious to follow 
the footsteps of local bands such as The 
Cars, Aerosmith, and Boston. 

Boston was a city in which the per- 
forming arts played a large and impor- 
tant role. The city welcomed all the 
traveling performers. This made many 
entertainers call Boston their home. 

— Laura Swain 



Clockwise from above: a young admirer lis- 
tens to an outdoor concert; the Arthur Fiedler 
memorial; ticket holders line up for a perfor- 
mance; a billboard for the play Shear Mad- 



Staff Photo 
34 / Boston 



Curtain Calls 




/. 



Staff Photo 



Boston / 35 



Perspective 



In the fall of 1985, Boston College be- 
came a member of the Museum of Fine 
Arts. For the first time, BC students could 



■atr*JilaB»sTSM"JlliWl#f ]|[wj»L^J|l 



of the last area schools to join the 
museum, but fortunately the administra- 
tion realized what a worthwhile cause it 
was. The information and beauty to be 
found in museums cannot be underesti- 



II HJIt7U. QUOIUI 1 O 1111^71^701 III 1 1101^1 y »y^w 

manifested culturally in its wide variety 
of museums. Painting, sculpture, textiles, 
and music were preserved in some of 
the finest museums in the country. 

The Museum of Fine Arts was the city's 
largest museum. Its specialties were 
Asiatic art and Impressionist paintings. 
There was also an extensive collection 
of Greek and Roman sculpture. These 
traditional exhibits were balanced by 
collections of musical instruments, 18th 



relation to its patrons and its schedules, 
lectures and classes reflected his con- 
cern. This museum was a perennial fa- 
vorite because it was so accessible and 
exciting. 

Across the street and in direct contrast 
to the MFA was the Gardner Museum. It 
was a reconstruction of a Italian 
Renaissance palace and its insides 
were crammed from floor to ceiling with 



sculpture. 



An especially unique museum was 
the Museum of Science. It was best 
known for its hands-on exhibits and chil- 



as the Theatre of Electricity, the Hayden 
Planetarium, and live animal shows 
rounded out the complex. The museum 
was divided in sections such as Mathe- 
matics, Physics, Human Physiology, and 



»M-i: ral iia fia 



films on famous scientists. The Museum 
of Science was a favorite of children 
and adults alike. 
Another destination of many school 



Aquarium. With its fabulous location on 
the Harbor, the Aquarium had exam- 
ples of over 2,000 different types of sea 
life. The large cylindrical tank in the mid- 
dle of the building hosted some of the 



w mBK K mmS BBH 



phin show, and whale watch trips in the 
summer. There were several special ex- 
hibits each year, such as the one on 
frogs and toads in 1983. Because of its 
close proximity to Faneuil Hall, the 
Aquarium was a favorite tourist attrac- 
tion. 

The Fogg Museum, the JFK Library, the 
Institute of Contemporary Art, the Chil- 
dren's Museum and The U.S.S. Constitu- 



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museums. For a city of its size, the popu- 



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36 / Boston 




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lation of museums was extraordinary. A 
major advantage to education in Bos- 
ton was access to these museums. They 
were an asset to be explored fully. 

— Colleen Seibert 

Clockwise from top left: the entrance to the 
MFA; the Children's Museum along the water- 
front; a summer art exhibit in the Public Gar- 
dens 



Geoff Why 



Boston / 37 




Clockwise from right: concerned citizens 
protest the problems In Central America; 
Guardian Angels protect Boston's subways 
and streets; prophetic graffittl sums up our 
problems; the side we never see; perhaps 
this bench is the only home he knows; this 
sign unashamedly promotes exploitation 




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38 / Boston 



Graffitti is often the only media by 
which the dejected person can express 
his or her rage. The word xeonphobia 
spray-painted on a wall represents the 
fear and anger a large number of Bosto- 
nians feel about the Boston community. 
Xenophobia is the fear of strangers. It is 
the fear of the unknown. This fear is an 
inhabitant of the back alleys, the park 
benches that are homes to derelicts, the 
insipid hotel room in the combat zone. It 
is an insidious virus which thrives in the 
mind of a prejudiced fool. It is a scurri- 
lous creature which turns the call girl's 
shame, the unemployed man's embar- 
assment, and the homeless indigent's 
hunger into anger. The anger is con- 
tained at most times but it can explode 
into riots and city-wide confrontation. 

Boston, the idyllic postcard town, 
erupted violently during the seventies 
over desegregation and forced busing. 
The mutual fear of whites and blacks 
would not be reconciled. But this prob- 
lem was merely the latest unleashing of 
a controversy first bred into the poor im- 
migrants at the turn of the century who 
were told by signs in shop windows and 
on park fences that "Italians need not 
apply" or "Irish must keep off the Grass." 

Yet this side of Boston, the darker side, 
was one seldom seen by the BC student. 
The hot spots were Quincy Market, Aku- 
Aku, The MFA, Copley Place, and all 
were scrupulously policed to keep mal- 
contents and undesirables away. The 



Side We 
Never See 




Makis latridis 



needed a cadre of Guardian Angels to 
feel safe. True, an element of con- 
cerned students dedicated themselves 
to fighting local injustices but it was too 
often world issues and the abuses of 
other countries which captured their 
best efforts. The need beyond the ever- 
so-well manicured lawns of Chestnut Hill 
was most often ignored. 

The true enemy of fear is knowledge. 
What can be understood can be ame- 
liorated. How ironic that so many of the 
students at so many of the educational 
institutions were misled by the promise of 
a high-paying job and forgot the altru- 
ism with which they came to school. 
How ironic that the darker side was left 
largely untouched by enlightened stu- 
dents. 

— T.H. McMorran 




Makis latridis 



Boston / 39 




kis latridis 



A city's philosophy is 
embodied in its 
architecture. Our skyline 
represents the aesthetic 
and historical freedom to 
which Boston is dedicated. 



40 / Boston 




Makis latridis 



Fair Play 

"The Globe's here," was the famous 



ness of sports in Beantown. Boston con- 
tinued to be one of the better sports 
cities in the states, while it reigned as the 
sports kingdom of the Northeast. 

Whether it was the "whirrr" of a puck 
at a Bruins game or the crack of a bat at 
a crowded Fenway Park, the "whish" of 
a Larry Bird jumpshot, the "uhhh" of col- 
liding bodies at Sullivan Stadium, or the 
chant of "Heisman" in Chestnut Hill, 
Boston was the HUB when it comes to 
sports. 

Boston had all four major league 
sports clubs to call their own in conjunc- 
tion with the excitement of college 
sports, which heated up in many spots 
throughout the city. In addition to the 
more common sports, Boston possessed 
a uniqueness in sports ranging from 
crewing on the Charles to the main 
event of spring, the Boston Marathon. 

Now for the local football fanatic, one 
had a variety from which to choose. The 
Patriots provided a big league orga- 
nization for those interested primarily in 
professional football while the Boston 



College Eagles, — "The Beast of the 



MWKlJ l MWyj I i ' lWJIBWIgJ 



If hockey was one's pleasure, Boston 
offered a great range of teams from 
which to choose. The Boston Bruins high- 
lighted the list as the team that couldn't 
win in the playoffs. But, to a younger 
generation looking for a good time, col- 
lege hockey was very hot. The Beanpot 
was the spotlight of the season as it pit- 
ted Boston College, Boston University, 
Harvard and Northeastern in a battle for 
city pride. 

Fenway Park was the stage which set 
the tone for many long conversations at 
the dinner table about the Red Sox. 
From April to October, Kenmore Square 
was oblivious to all chatter except that 
which had to do with baseball. 

And who can forget the Celtics, the 
team who captivated the basketball 
world in 1984 with a thrilling seventh 
game victory to take home the coveted 
World Championship Trophy. Tickets 
were scarce as hoopla mania invaded 
North Station in the winter months. 

But what about the "other" sports 
which occurred in Boston? The streets 




• 



tfORL- CHAMPIONS 



were lined from Hopkinton to Boston in 



ning became the overwhelming favor- 
ite sport among fitness and health en- 
thusiasts in the Boston area. One could 
not take a drive in the area without see- 
ing dozens of joggers and runners in all 
types of weather, doing what they loved 
to do most. Biking was also a major in- 
dependent sport in the Boston vicinity, 
especially with so many beautiful and 
scenic suburbs and countrysides that 
took one through farmland, mountains, 
and shorelines. 

Well, all this has been said about Bos- 
ton Sports, but what about the people 
who kept the sports in motion, the fans'' 
From a sold out Sullivan Stadium to an 
overcrowded Boston Garden, it was 
very apparent that the fans supported 
their teams 100%! 

Putting these factors together, they 
added up to a center of athletic unity, 
support, and success. When asked, 
"How do you spell SPORTS?", the New 
Englander's response was "B-O-S-T-O- 
N." 

— Keith Gnazzo 



* 



Makis latndis 



* 



42 / sports 




Red Sox action at Fenway Park. Celtics ac- 
tion at the Boston Garden. 



Photos Courtesy of Boston Red Sox, Boston Celtics 



Boston / 43 




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Pete Hillenbrand 











all nrf* ' 



Makis latridis 
Clockwise from above: a display of Boston's unique 
magazine; a hard-core BC fan — Bob Lobel of WBZ-TV; a 
radio station dedicated to rock 'n' roll; a newsstand In 
Copley Sq. offers all the local magazines and news- 
papers. 






*— 





Staff Photo 



44 / Boston 



Covering It All 



Part of the total experience of going 
to BC was exposure to the city of Boston. 
The city's media were aware of the vast 
college audience demanding to be in- 
formed, entertained or just a part of 
happenings in the area, and they re- 
sponded to it with zest, Boston's televi- 
sion and radio stations, newspapers 
and magazines had something to offer 
every taste and talent. 

One of the first decisions a college 
freshman made was what radio stations 
to listen to. Music was essential to dorm 
living and it did not take long to discover 
the "cool" radio stations of Boston. 
WHTT, "Hit Radio", was probably the 
most popular among college students. 
It played all the latest Top 40 tunes — 
over and over again. The class of '85 will 
always equate freshman year with 
"We've Got the Beat" and "She's a Very 
Kinky Girl"; junior year was saturated 
with Michael Jackson. 

"Magic 106", WMJX, played mostly 
mellow love songs. Lionel Ritchie and 
James Taylor spent a lot of time on this 
end of the dial. These were the songs to 
start romance. But at the opposite end 
of the spectrum was WBCN and its good 
ole rock and roll. "The Rock of Boston" 
was the ultimate college station, as was 
witnessed by their "Welcome Back" fire- 
works display during the beginning of 
September. 





As much as radio was a staple of col- 
lege, television became a luxury 
squeezed in between homework and 
jobs. It was a way to keep in touch with 
the outside world, as well as to escape 
from it. 

The quintessential Boston College sta- 
tion was Channel 38, WSBK. Between 
Clint Eastwood Week on The Movie 
Loft, M*A*S*H at 5:00 and 7:00, and 
The Twilight Zone, there was fun and 
thrills for everyone. 

Of the local news programs, Channel 
4's Jack and Liz were the favorite BC 
team. Their stories covered "the heart of 
New England", which included frequent 
stories on Boston College. Sportscaster 
Bob Lobel was an Eagles' fan who kept 
us updated on the AP poll between 
"Sports Spotlight" clips. 

As if college students did not have 
enough reading to do, Boston's major 
newspapers were also available. "The 
Globe's Here" was ingrained in students 
from the first week at school. The Boston 
Globe received two Pulitzer Prizes in 
1984, indicative of its fine journalism. 
Wednesday was coupon day for lower 
campus shoppers. Every Thursday, the 
"Calendar" had a complete list of 
goings on for the weekend, including 
movie reviews and cheap eats. 

The Boston Herald appealed to a 
much different crowd. With its scare 



headlines and celebrity columnists, the 
Herald was perfect for readers on the T 
or on the grocery checkout line. This 
paper appealed to those students who 
were afraid they could not live without 
The New York Post or "Scratch for Cash". 

A paper with a more artistic thrust was 
The Boston Phoenix. Always on the 
leading edge of music, art and style. 
Phoenix writers sought out the inane 
and the insane. Students who wished to 
expand their knowledge of contempor- 
ary fashions could turn to this weekly. A 
good review could mean a big break 
for a local band or artist. 

A uniquely bostonian publication was 
Boston Magazine. The magazine was 
well known for its annual "Best of Boston" 
issue which reviewed the most interest- 
ing and exciting aspects of the city. 
Monthly feature articles looked in-depth 
at issues important to Boston residents. 

It is indicative of every large city to 
have a wide variety of media. Each 
form has its own audience and these 
are divided even more into specific 
segments. The communication leaders 
in Boston served their city, while also giv- 
ing its college population opportunities 
to become a part of the happenings for 
four years; and the students embraced 
them eagerly. 

— Colleen Seibert 



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Staff Photo 



Boston / 45 



Peter Klidaras 



46 / Boston 



John Boswell 



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Boston. College. The two words de- 
fined each other in every sense of the 
words. It was a combination which was 
well recognized by most people 
throughout the cultured world. Defining 
the word "college", not only referred to 
the Chestnut Hill university but also the 
numerous other institutions which made 
the city of Boston a purified college 
town. 

Within a 60 mile radius of downtown 
Boston, there were 30 four-year col- 
leges, an outstanding figure for one city. 
The big names include, of course, Har- 
vard, MIT, Boston University, Boston Col- 
lege, but what about some of the lesser 
knowns such as Wheelock College or 
Curry College? These schools added to 
the enrichment of Boston's college life 
as well. 

The rivalry between the colleges 
across the city was an integral part of 
Boston. At BC, a sense of rivalry was evi- 
dent in the sport of hockey. It was most 
evident in February as the four Boston 
hockey powers clashed for Boston's 
most coveted prize, the Beanpot trophy. 
BC, BU, Harvard, and Northeastern 
faced-off in this annual war. The victor of 
this tournament was allowed to savor 
the supremacy of their school over the 
opposition for a full year. 

But, there was not always bad blood 
between the area schools. It was com- 
monplace to overhear students on the 
Chestnut Hill campus state, "yeah, let's 
go visit Stevie over at Hahvahd tonight." 
Many a student travelled to Pine Manor 
for Thursday Night at the Pub too. Many 
schools tried to attract visitors from the 
other area schools by posting signs as to 
the upcoming events. 

Even in Boston students sometimes got 
the urge to "take-off" for a weekend 
and for a "road trip". A favorite spot for 
BC students was the University of Ver- 
mont in the city of Burlington. In the win- 
ter especially, the new fallen snow 
attracted many anxious travellers (aside 
from the eighteen year old drinking 
age). 

The city of Boston will continue its rich 
tradition of catering to the young peo- 
ple. It will continue to prosper as long as 
students still want to study at a place 
called Beantown. 

— Keith Gnazzo 



Boston / 47 




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oston Is Marching By" 

Words — Herbert A. Kenny 
Music — Theo N. Marier '34 

Boston's out to win again 

the Eagles in again 

he's in to stay 

The team is primed to play the game 

and bring it's further fame j ^^ 

toolcTB""C" U Sbli 
Shout! Let your banners wave — on 
Shout! Let your voices fill — the sky 
Sing a song of victory 
Boston is marching by. — by. 

52 / Sports 



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Peter Klidaras 



Sports / 55 



On September 1 , the 1984 Boston Col- 
lege football season began with a 
great deal of anticipation. BC fans 
hoped that this was the year that would 
prove to be the best since the early 
1940's when the Eagles travelled to three 
major bowl games. In 1984, the Eagles 
looked forward to surpassing 1983's 9-2 
regular season record, winning another 
Lambert Trophy, playing in a major 
bowl, and who knew, maybe even win- 
ning the National Championship. 1984 



was a special season because it was 
the senior finale for a 5'9 three-quarter" 
quarterback from Natick, Mas- 
sachusetts who, namely Doug Flutie, 
was one of top candidates to win the 
Heisman Trophy. 
BC 44 Western Carolina 24 

In the opener against Western Caroli- 
na, the Eagles rolled to a 44-24 victory 
over the Division 1-AA school. BC 
jumped to an early lead which it never 
relinquished. Flutie had little trouble in 



throwing for 330 yards and four touch- 
downs, but some weaknesses were evi- 
dent in the contest as Western Carolina 
was able to move the ball fairly well. 
Flutie's fourth TD pass of the day 
equaled the BC career mark of 44, and 
Doug still had all season to surpass it. 
BC 38 Alabama 31 On September 8, 
the Eagles travelled down to the heart of 
college football, Birmingham, Ala- 
bama, to play the Crimson Tide. Trailing 
31-14 after Kerry Goode's 99 yard kickoff 




Peter Klidaras 
56 / Sports 



return to open the second half, the 
Eagles received a break of sorts. The 
unstoppable Goode was stopped by 
an injury and the Alabama offense sput- 
tered. Doug Flutie and the Eagle offense 
went to work as Flutie ran for one touch- 
down and pitched off to Jim Browne for 
another. With that, a field goal by Kevin 
Snow, and a rejuvanated defense, the 
Eagles and the Tide found themselves 
deadlocked at 31 with just over 5 min- 
utes left in the game. Tony Thurman's 



third interception of the day set up the 
game-winning drive, and Troy Strad- 
ford's 44 yard burst up the middle pro- 
vided the winning margin, BC 38 Ala- 
bama 31. It was a comeback which will 
be remembered in Eagle history. 
BC 52 North Carolina 20 

The next foe was supposed to be a 
formidable one in the Tar Heels of North 
Carolina, who were led by outstanding 
lineman Micah Moon, and flashy tail- 
back Ethan Horton. Sullivan Stadium 




and a national TV audience were awed 
at what occurred. When it was all said 
and done the Eagles had erupted for a 
52-20 win, in one of the most lopsided 
contests of BC's recent history. Flutie the 
Magician was on track as he com- 
pleted 28 of 38 passes for 354 yards and 
an incredible 6 touchdown passes. The 
Eagles at one point in the contest held a 
gaping 31-0 lead before Horton 
sparked the Tar Heel offense to manage 
20 points of their own. 

The Eagles ended September with a 
3-0 record which included two victories 
over formidable opponents. The Eagles 
then had a three week layoff to climb up 
in the polls and to prepare for the Owls 
of Temple. 
BC 24 Temple 10 

After the three week layoff, the Eagles 
hosted the Owls of Temple. The layoff 
affected the Eagles as evidenced by 
their dismal first half. It took the Eagle? 
almost 19 minutes before Kevin Snow put 
one through from 26 yards for a 3-0 BC 
lead. It was shortlived though as Temple 
charged back to take a 7-3 lead on 
Paul Palmer's 4 yard TD run. It appeared 
the Eagles would go into the locker 
room trailing, but Flutie showed his 
magic by hitting Gerard Phelan with a 
51 yard "Flood-Tip" TD miracle and the 
Eagles led 9-7 at the half. 

Temple took a 10-9 lead early in the 
fourth quarter and the Eagles unbeaten 
mark seemed in trouble. But a two yard 
Steve Strachan touchdown run and a 
Dave Periera interception, which he re- 
turned 35 yards for a score, put all 
doubts to rest in this chippy affair. The 
Eagles were on to Morgantown with a 
4-0 record, coming out of this one with a 
24-10 triumph. 
West Virginia 21 BC 20 

As the undefeated and highly ranked 
Eagles travelled to Morgantown to take 
on the Mountaineers of West Virginia, 
memories lingered in BC minds how this 
team had ruined their two previous sea- 
sons with two impressive defeats of the 
Eagles. There were also memories of 
how Flutie had never beaten this team 
and in order for him to complete his 
storybook career, this victory would 
have to be a chapter. 

On the other hand, West Virginia had 
some advantages of their own. They 
had their third largest crowd in history 
and also they wanted revenge on the 
Eagles for "stealing" their Lambert Tro- 
phy the year before. 

But, the storybook season did not 
seem to be endangered as the Eagles 
showed their strengths by taking a 20-6 
halftime advantage on a couple of 
Kevin Snow field goals, a Steve Strachan 
draw play TD run, and, of course, a Flu- 
tie TD pass. 

In the second half, things began to 

turn sour. A defensive mistake allowed 

WV quarterback Kevin White to hit Willie 

Drewery on a 52 yard bomb inside the 

(continued on p. 60) 

Sports / 57 



6 Football a 




(continued from p. 56-57) 
BC 5. No worry though, BC still had an 11 
point lead of 20-9. But, Ron Wolfley put it 
over from the one and with one auarter 
remaining, the Eagles lead had di- 
minished to 20-15. 

The West Virginia defense stymied 
Flutie and the Eagle offense (19 yards 
total rushing on the day). So the stage 
was set with the Mountaineers with the 
ball on their own 20. A star emerged on 
the drive as running back John Gay car- 
ried for much of the yardage on the 
drive, including the gamer, a five yard 



burst with 4:52 left. 

No panic, there was still time for Flutie 
magic. But, today it was not to be. Flutie 
did complete 21 of 42 passes for 299 
yards and a touchdown, but he missed 
his final two passes and the Eagles 
dreams of an undefeated season had 
vanished. 
BC 35 Rutgers 23 

Back at Alumni Stadium, the Eagles 
produced another subpar perfor- 
mance, but they managed to defeat 
the vastly improved Scarlet Knights from 



Rutgers. The Eagles took a 21-10 halftime 
edge as Flutie hit Troy Stradford, Kelvin 
Martin and Peter Casparillo for first half 
TD's. The second half started out well as 
Flutie rushed in from the one to make it 
28-10. But Rutgers had weapons of their 
own and they dominated the rest of the 
second half. Newly converted guarter- 
back Eric Hochberg (23 / 51 249 yards) 
teamed up with great receiver Andrew 
Baker (12 catches 141 yards) on two key 
scoring drives and it was suddenly 28-20 
BC. 




L 



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Andy Ryan 

60 / Sports 



The Eagles put to rest the critics as Ken 
Bell took it in from eight yards out to give 
the Eagles a 35-20 advantage. Rutgers 
could only manage a field goal in the 
late stages to complete a 35-23 score. 

Flutie watch: 21 / 30, 318 yards, 3 TD's 
passing, 1 rushing, 2 interceptions. 
Penn State 37 BC 30 

Even though Doug Strang completed 
only 4 of 18 passes coming off the 
bench, he keyed the Penn State 37-30 
victory over the BC Eagles. Things 
looked fine for the Eagles as Kern Bell 



broke it long for a 71 yard touchdown 
run and BC led 7-3. But BC's fortunes 
were shortlived as Penn State running of 
D.J. Dozier (143 yards, 1TD) and Steve 
Smith (126, 2] keyed a drive which put 
Penn State ahead for good 10-7. The 
Eagles's were scrapping from behind all 
day. It got worse as Strang connected 
for one of his big plays, a 42 yard scoring 
strike to Herb Bellamy; 17-7 PSU. BC 
couldn't score from in close and had to 
settle for a field goal and a 17-10 half- 
time disadvantage. 




Doug Flutie finally put it together 
under all the Nittany Lion pressure and 
the Eagles closed the gap to 29-23 with 
9 minutes remaining. But, Jack Bicknell 
elected to go for a two-point conversion 
and their failure to convert seemed to 
take the wind out of the BC sails. 

Strang then put on his clinic as he 
fooled everyone with a 28 yard gain on 
third down and long which kept Doug 
Flutie (29/53, 447 yards, 1 TD, 2 in- 
terceptions) and company off the field. 
To make matters worse, Dozier took it in 
from 39 yards out on the next play and it 
was now PSU 37 BC 23. Once agarn, 
Flutie gave BC hopes with his continued 
magic against Penn State and the 
Eagles only trailed by 7. But, Strang 
rushed for first downs on two key third 
down plays to make it BC's second loss 
in three weeks. 
BC 45 Army 31 

The highlight of Flutie's final home 
game at Alumni Stadium was some- 
thing to be remembered. It was an 18 
yard pass from Flutie to Kelvin Martin 
which put Doug Flutie atop the list as the 
all-time total offense leader in colle- 
giate football history. 

Otherwise, it was a day of ups ana 
downs which saw a different brand of 
football for the New England fans, the 
wishbone. Quarterback Nate Sassa- 
man (136 yards rushing) and key runner 
Rick Black tore apart the Eagles line all 
day to give BC defense fits. 

Army managed to close the gap with 
a two minute wishbone drill at the end of 
the first half and it was 28-14 BC. Army 
closed the gap to 38-31 with twelve min- 
utes left on a Jarvis Hollingsworth 10 yard 
run, but Flutie (19/29, 311 yards, 3 TD's) 
hit Kevin Martin (7 catches, 133 yards, 2 
TD's, 45 yard TD punt return) from 17 
yards out and the Eagles were 6-2 on the 
season. 
BC 24 Syracuse 16 

It was a trek to Sullivan Stadium to 
play a team which had dashed BC's 
Fiesta Bowl hopes the previous year in 
the Carrier Dome; it was revenge; it was 
the Syracuse game. 

With a Harold Gayden TD run and a 
Don McAuley field goal, the previous 
season's nightmare was being relived, 
10-7 Syracuse at the half. 

On a cold day which saw Flutie have 
trouble passing (10 / 21 , 1 36 yards) , it was 
the running game which took control. 
Troy Stradford's five yard TD run put the 
Eagles ahead to stay 14-10. A Kevin 
Snow field goal and Kelvin Martin's 78 
punt return for a score put the game out 
of reach at 24-10. It was Flutie's running 
(81 yards) and the BC defense which 
keyed this 24-16 victory and a berth in 
the Cotton Bowl. 
BC 47 Maimi 45 

It was the day after Thanksgiving with 
a national television audience and two 
of the greatest passers in the college 
game in Doug Flutie and Miami's soph- 
continued on p. 64) 

Sports / 61 



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(continued from p. 60-61 ) 
omore sensation Bernie Kosar. It was a 
game that lived up to its billing, and 
them some. It was probably one of the 
greatest college football games in his- 
tory. It was a game which made Doug 
Flutie a national hero, and then some. 

Flutie started the show with two quick 
TD's and a 14-0 BC lead, and thoughts of 
no-contest lingered in BC minds. It was 
not to be. The defending champion Hur- 
ricanes battled back with their superstar 
Kosar (447 yards passing) and newly 
found sensation, running back Melvin 
Bratton (4 TD's). It was a game in which 
commentator Brent Musberger jokingly 
stated, "The team that has it last will win 
this one." It seemed that team was 
Miami as Bratton scored his final TD of 
the day from one yard out to put Miami 
up 45-41 with just 28 seconds to go. 

After completing 2 of 3 to the Miami 
48, Flutie (472 yards passing) had only 
:06 remaining on the clock. Enter once 
more the magic. It was a pass which 



was seen by most of the nation, and it 
skyrocketed Flutie into fame and made 
believers of all. The ball travelled 64 
yards in the air and nestled itself in the 
arms of Gerard Phelan who snuck be- 
hind the Miami defenders in the end 
zone. There was no way to describe it in 
words. Flutie had done the impossible 
. . . once again. 
BC 45 Holy Cross 10 

A sold out Fitton Field in Worcester, 
Mass. was on hand to witness Doug Flu- 
tie's final regular season college foot- 
ball game. He had done it all, including 
becoming the top collegiate passer of 
all time. But, there was one more thing 
that Doug Flutie wanted to accomplish 
in his final collegiate game, and he did 
just that, connecting with brother Darren 
on a TD pass in the third quarter. 

The game was not an early romp as 
most fans expected. Holy Cross be- 
lieved they could pull the major upset, 
and when QB Peter Muldoon scored on 



a two yard burst with :32 left in the first 
half, making it 17-10 BC, the impossible 
seemed within reach. 

But, the second half was a different 
story for the Crusaders as they experi- 
enced the explosives of the BC offense. 
Troy Stradford raced in from 44 yards out 
and then it was Flutie to Flutie to make it 
31-10 Eagles. The onslaught continued 
as Darren Flutie ran one in for his first 
career rushing TD and then Flutie (276 
passing yards) connected on his third TD 
pass of the game, this one to Kelvin Mar- 
tin to make the final 45-10 BC. 

BC finished the season with an impres- 
sive 9-2 record and a ranking of 7th in 
the Associated Press poll. Doug Flutie 
flew out of Worcester and received his 
Heisman Trophy on the eve of the Holy 
Cross game. After that, the Eagles still 
had one more order of business: The 
Cotton Bowl. 

— Tim Bever and Keith Gnazzo 




Peter Kildaras 

64 / Sports 



Team '84 




Courtesy of Sports Publicity 



1984 Boston College Football Team and Staff 

(starting from Bottom row to top row — left to right) 1st row: Tri-Captains — Mark MacDonald, David Thomas, Scott 
Harrington 2nd row: Joe Giaquinto, Kevin Snow, Chris Tripuka, Mark Adams, Mike Ryan, Steve Peach, Shawn Halloran, 
Rorery Perryman, Tim George, Keith Seely 3rd row: Michael Williams, Ken Mariarty, Sean Camnody, Paul Digeronimo, Rick 
Nickeson, Mike Willging, Tony Thruman, Ken Kanzler, Chuck Gregory, Gerard Phelan 4th row: Tyrone Taylor, Doug Flutie, 
Troy Stradford, Ken Bell, William' Hislop, Darren Flutie, Greg Santo, Vincent Munn, Jay Sullivan, Steve Williams 5th row: Jim 
Hassel, Jim Browne, Steve Strachan, John Mihalik, Karl Kreshpane, Peter Holey, Kevin Sullivan, John Glavin, Jim Bell, Jim 
Turner 6th row: David Pereira, Neil Iton, Shawn Dombroski, Todd Russell, Bill Thompson, Cecil Ricks, Gerrick McPhearson, 
Carl Pellegata, Joseph Wolf, Bill Romanowski 7th row: Shawn Regent, Ed Von Nessen, Darren Twombly, Ted Gaffney, 
Mark Gowetski, Mike Buckley, Mike Clohisy, Rich Joy, Karl Maier, Mark Bardwell 8th row: Sante D'Ambrosio, Steve Trapilo, 
Jack Bicknell, Mark Murphy, Mike Ruth, David Widell, Jeff Oliver, David Nugent, Tom Porell 9th row: Jim Ostrowski, Doug 
Widell, James Kwithoff, Paul Westerkamp, Jeff King, Ed Fahey, Jeff Simpson, Andy Hemmer, Kelvin Martin, Scott 
Gieselman 10th row: Roy Norden, Peter Casparriello, Bill Smithers, Brendon Murphy, Kyle Hudgins, Sean Murphy, Jon 
Bronner, Mike Saylor, Charlie Smith, James Murphy 11th row: Bob Fitzgerald, Patrick Ard, Chuck Gorecki, Patrick Walsh, 
John Bosa, Mike Degnen, Eric Lindstrom 12th row: (managers) — Jon Callahan, Dan Dischino,Tim Callahan, Kevin Lehner, 
Jamie Hajjar, John Rorke, Mark Wilson, Mike Nolan, Gina Caruso 13th row: (coaches) — Peter Carmichael, Red Kelin, Jeff 
Kaufman, Tim Fitzgerald, Orfo Collilouri, Kevin Lempa, Jack Bicknell, Barry Gallup, Mike Masser, Vince Martino, Sam 
Timer, Michael Godbolt, Frank DeFelice 



Sports / 65 



Football 



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Andy Ryan 





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Sports / 67 




Our Past Bowls 



Cotton Bowl Dallas, Texas January 

1, 1940 

Boston College 3 Clemson 6 

Frank Leahy came to Boston College 
in 1939, succeeding the immortal Gil 
Dobie, and immediately declared, "I 
did not come to BC to fail." Nor did the 
29-year old protege of Knute Rockne, 
who had tutored Fordham's mighty 
Seven Blocks of Granite. 

His team was ranked 11th nationally 
when it faced Clemson in the Cotton 
Bowl, the first New England team to go 
to a bowl in 20 years. The Eagles took a 
3-0 lead on Alex Lukachick's 24-yard 
field goal, but Clemson roared right 
back on its next possession and Charley 
Timmons ran for the score. 

That was it for the day. Banks McFad- 
den knocked down three Charley 
O'Rourke passes in the end zone in the 
fourth quarter and BC drove to the 
Clemson eight yard line late in the 
game, only to miss. 

Sugar Bowl, New Orleans, Louisiana 

January 1, 1941 

Boston College 19 Tennessee 13 



In Leahy's second year, the Eagles 
went unbeaten in 11 games, and won 
their only national championship, 
thanks to a gritty come-from-behind 19- 
13 win over Tennessee in the Sugar Bowl. 

The Volunteers, which had not lost a 
regular season game in three years, led 
7-0 at the half but Joe Zabliski's recovery 
of a blocked punt set up Harry Connolly's 
tie-making touchdown and extra-point 
in the third quarter. 

Tennessee came right back to take a 
13-7 lead, but Mike Holovak ended a 
60-yard drive when he scored BC's sec- 
ond touchdown. However, Leahy 
elected to run Holovak for the extra point 
and Mike was stopped, and the score 
remained tied 13-13. 

Don Currivan blocked a Tennessee 
field goal in the fourth quarter, and this 
started BC on its winning drive, as two 
passes to Ed Zabliski from O'Rourke got 
the ball to the Vol's 30-yard line. Two 
plays later, O'Rourke, behind Hank Toc- 
zylowski's block, ran 24 yards for the win- 
ning TD. 

Orange Bowl, Miami, Florida Janu- 



ary 1, 1943 

Boston College 21 Alabama 37 

This was a wild affair, as BC once led 
14-0 on a pair of Hollovak TDs. Mike 
scored three that day, one on a 65-yard 
run another on a 34-yard sweep. 

After Alabama grabbed a 19-14 
lead, Holovak's third TD, a two-yard 
plunge, and Connolly's PAT gave the 
Eagles a 21-19 lead. By this time, injuries 
had begun to pile up for BC (Mario 
Gianelli, one of the team's best linemen, 
broke his toe getting dressed for the 
game and never played) and Alaba- 
ma took the lead for good on a field 
goal. They soon had a 28-21 advantage 
and the Eagles missed their final 
chance when unable to score from the 
eight yard line in the fourth quarter. 

Tangerine Bowl, Orlando, Florida 

December 18, 1982 

Boston College 26 Auburn 33 

Eagles quarterback Doug Flutie put 
on a dazzling performance, complet- 
ing 22 of 38 passes for 299 yards and 
two touchdowns (he also scored on a 
five-yard run and accounted for a pair 



68 / Sports 




Photo courtesy of sports publicity 




Photo courtesy of sports publicity 

cont. from 68 

of two-point conversions), but the 
Eagles' furious second-half rally fell just 
short of victory. 

The Eagles scored on the first drive of 
the game, and then played 
tremendous defense, stopping the 
nationally ranked Auburn Tigers twice 
on drives inside their own five-yard line 
without surrendering a touchdown. 

The Tigers, who had beaten Alaba- 
ma in their final regular season contest, 
used their blinding outside speed to 
score three TDs in the second period, 
however, and opened their lead to 33- 
10 by the end of the third. 

Boston College's coaches and play- 



ers never gave up and battled back in 
the fourth quarter of this nationally- 
televised game which saw Flutie pitch- 
scoring passes to tight end Scott Nizolek 
and wide receiver Brian Brennan in a 
last-ditch effort to win. Brennan caught 
seven passes for 149 yard and one TD in 
the game, but it was Flutie who was 
named "Outstanding Offensive Player" 
by the national broadcast crews. 

Liberty Bowl, Memphis, Tennessee 

December 29, 1983 

Boston College 18 Notre Dame 19 

Despite bitter 1 1 -degree temperatures 
(zero with the wind-chill factor), Flutie 
shined once again in post-season ac- 
tion, completing 16 of 37 passes for 287 



yards and three touchdowns. The hun- 
gry Fighting Irish, however, also tallied 
three touchdowns and emerged a one- 
point victor. 

In BC's first possession, Flutie marched 
the Eagles 63 yards in 7 plays, culminat- 
ing in a 17-yard scoring toss to Brian 
Brennan. Notre Dame's Allen Pinkett 
plunged over from the one, and follow- 
ing Mike Johnston's extra-point kick (the 
only successful PAT conversion of the 
night), the Irish were ahead at the end of 
the first 7-6. After ND scored twice more 
in the second quarter, Gerard Phelan 
snagged a 28-yard TD aerial from Flutie 
to close the gap to 19-12 by halftime. 

Scott Gieselman grabbed a 3-yard 
touchdown flip from Flutie midway 
through the third quarter, but the contest 
was a deadlock defensive struggle for 
the remainder of the evening. With 1 :08 
left in a fourth-down situation on Notre 
Dame's 35, Flutie's toss intended for Joe 
Giaquinto up the middle fell incom- 
plete. 

The Irish's ground game was impres- 
sive, Pinkett rushed for 111 yards and 
Chris Smith rambled for 104. Tailback 
Troy Stradford was the Eagles leading 
ground gainer with 51 yards on 16 car- 
ries. Flutie, however, was named the 
games Most Valuable Player for his ae- 
rial efforts. 

— Sports Publicity 



Sports / 69 



Men's Tennis 




Alison Brooks 



70 / Sports 




Peter Sarram 



Serving an Ace 




Pv 




kWu. «■' 



The men's tennis team at Boston Col- 
lege has a proud history and the 1984- 
1985 season was no different. The stage 
was set and a squad compiled of 
undergrads was prepared to capture 
another Big East Crown. The 1984-85 edi- 
tion of the team was without the services 
of the 1983-84 Big East singles and dou- 
bles champion John O'Connell, and 
also without senior Bill Kelly who de- 
parted from the team before the start of 
the season in September. 

So with two stars of the team no longer 
in uniform, what was to be expected of 
this new edition of young men? Accord- 
ing to the Boston College Men's tennis 
coach Mike MacDonald, "This was the 
youngestteam I've ever had." He wasn't 
kidding. The layout of the team in- 
cluded two juniors, five sophomores, 
one freshman, and no seniors. The top 
rated players for the squad were Carlos 
Silva and Louis Nunez. Silva, first seed on 
the team, was a sophomore from Poto- 
mac, Maryland, while Nunez, second 
seed, was also a sophomore who 
hailed from Madeline, Columbia. These 
two also paired up for the number one 
doubles combination on the team. 

The number two doubles team was 
the combination of the co-captains Jim 
Garaventi and Paul Rolincik. Garaventi 
was a junior, with much tennis experi- 
ence, coming from Moorestown, New 



Jersey. In the other captain spot was 
Rolincik. He too was a junior. But his 
home was close to the B.C. campus hail- 
ing from Lexington, Massachusetts. 
These two men played extremely well 
together. They had much experience as 
a duo, having been a pair since fresh- 
man year. Rolincik and Garaventi 
teamed up in doubles as freshman to 
clinch the 1981 Big East Championship 
for the Eagles. 

The remaining four players on the 
squad came from diverse back- 
grounds. They were as ladened with tal- 
ent as the rest of the squad. 

Much depth was added by Bob Con- 
klin, a sophomore from Fairfield, Con- 
necticut, who had a solid year while he 
was a frosh. His solid game has added 
some experience to a team in which it 
was much needed. 

Newcomer Brian Bortnick added to 
the youth of the team, but also to the 
immense talent. Brian was a freshman 
who coach MacDonald said, "is going 
to be a good one — a sleeper." Bortnick 
came from Chevy Chase, Maryland. 

Filling out the roster for the dedicated 

squad of racketeers were sophomores 

Chris Smith from Joliet, Illinois and Eric 

Weinheimer from Syracuse, New York. 

— Keith Gnazzo 



Alison Brooks 



Sports/ 71 




Cross 



The 1984 editions of the men's and 
women's cross country teams had im- 
pressive campaigns. For the first time in 
Boston College history, and also the first 
time in New England history, both the 
men's and women's teams qualified for 
the NCAA Championships. 

The women's team experienced its 
best season by far, which was made 
evident by their record. Among the 
Eagles laureates included wins against 
Northeastern, UMass and Brown in a tri- 
meet. The ladies also claimed second 
place finishes in the National Catholic 
Championships, the Greater Boston 
Championships, and the BIG EAST 
Championships. To culminate the com- 
petitions, the Eagles took first in the New 
England Championships. 

The team was led by Junior Michele 
Hallet whose successes included a 
course record 17:52 in the Greater Bos- 
ton Championship. Other key runners on 
the squad were Ann Fallon, Virginia 
Conners, Mary Helen Peterson, Sharon 
Willis, Jennifer Weeks, and Therese 
Doucette who aside from Hallet were all 
selected for All-New-England. 

Coach Jack McDonald was excited 
about their qualifying for NCAA's. "It's 
like the Rose Bowl for us. It guarantees 
national ranking and that's the first time 
for Women's Cross Country at BC. But," 
he noted, "we have done a lot of things 
this year that we have never done be- 
fore." 

The men also conducted an impres- 
sive campaign as they made their way 
into the NCAA tournament. The highlight 
of the season came at the New England 
Championships as the men battered 
everyone in the tourney, with their 
closest oppositions being Yale, who 
was thirteen points behind. 

The Eagles were led by Todd Re- 
nehen, Fernando Braz, Joe Rocha, John 
Clopeck and Paul Plissey for the year. 
Jack McDonald was very pleased with 
the BC success in the cross country de- 
partment last year. The teams exceded 
all expectations and went on to the most 
productive campaign in BC history. 



72 / Sports 




Geoff Why 



Country 




Sports / 73 



Men's Golf 




Geoff Whv 



Chris Hanley 



■*;* 




n the Links 





The 1984-85 edition of the BC Golf 
Team came back with much experi- 
ence. Ten lettermen returned for the sea- 
son. A feeling of confidence surfaced 
among the veterans. Mentor Eddie Car- 
roll, BC golf coach since 1961 and Assis- 
tant Athletic Director for the 1984-85 ac- 
ademic year, was confident about the 
new team which derived an 8-6 record 
from 1983-84. 

The 1984-85 squad was led by senior 
Captain Phil Callahan. Through his natu- 



"An incoming fresh- 
man golfer doesn't 
need time to season, 
like most football 
players do/' 



ral talent and devotion, Phil became 
the number one golfer at Boston Col- 
lege. Ranking behind Phil as the key 
golfers at the Heights were: Chris Van- 
der Velde, Paul Buckley, Mike Hayes, 
Bob Doherty, Jim Devlin, Mike Sherry 
and Peter Collins. The only newcomer to 
this group was Doherty as he was a 



standout freshman who held his own on 
the team. 

Boston College was among the top 5 
teams in New England over the past few 
years. Callahan stated in the fall, "This 
spring should be no exception!" On the 
competitive side, Boston College 
played such top name teams as Brown, 
Dartmouth, Harvard, and MIT. BC also 
competed in a number of tournaments, 
such as the Big East Tourney, the ECAC 
tournament, and the New England tour- 
nament. 

With his job as Assistant Athletic Direc- 
tor, Carroll could not give as much time 
as he would have liked to the team, 
therefore Brad Vermeulen served as the 
"organizer" of the team. Though Carroll 
was not a golf pro he did assist the play- 
ers with the mental aspects of the game 
as best he could. Carroll felt that age 
didn't matter in the sport of golf as it did 
in a sport such as football. "An incoming 
freshman golfer doesn't need time to 
season, like most football players do," 
said Carroll. 

The Boston College golf team found 
its home at the Charles River Country 
Club located in Cambridge. 

— Keith Gnazzo 



Geoff Why 
4 / Sports 




Field 




Under the direction of first-year coach 
Charlene Morett, the Boston College 
Women's Field Hockey Team com- 
pleted the season with a successful 1 3-4- 
1 record. Headed by the high-scoring 
duo of Lynn Frates and Linda Griffin, this 
was a team to be reckoned with. 

The team got off to a rough start as the 
Eagles suffered two tough overtime loss- 
es to the likes of ever-powerful UConn, 
and Springfield, who they met later in 
the ECAC's. So, after 7 games, the ladies 
were at a 3-3-1 clip, on about the same 
pace as the 9-8-2 1983 squad. 

BC became a force as they ripped off 
victories in ten of their final eleven 
matches. In the middle of that streak, 
goaltender Cathy O'Brien registered 
three consecutive shutouts over The likes 
of Northeastern, Bentley and Rhode Is- 
land. 

The Eagles had won eight of their last 
nine as they headed into the ECAC's 
looking for victory and more important- 
ly, a berth in the NCAA's Final Twelve. 
Morett's statement, "The ECAC tourna- 
ment was definitely the highlight of the 
season," was solidly backed up, as the 
Eagles got revenge on Springfield 3-2, 
and then defeated Ursinus 3-0 to cap- 
ture the 1984 ECAC Championship in 
front of a home crowd at Chestnut Hill. 

It was a storybook season: The Eagles 
had a new coach, they had only Tour 
losses, they were nationally ranked, and 



they had just won the ECAC's. The next 
logical step in the progression was a 
berth in the NCAA tournament. But, it 
was not to be, as Virginia was given the 
final playoff spot, a team which BC had 
beaten 2-1 in their opener. Morett 
stated, "We were definitely dis- 
appointed by not making the NCAA's, 
buf I am very proud of the women's 
achievements this year. We'll just have 
to set higher goals next year." 

They had to set those goals without 
Lynn Frates, who led the team with 14 
goals. She was lost to graduation along 
with reserve goalkeeper Nancy Gon- 
salves. But, the return of Linda Griffin was 
something to look forward to. Griffin 
nailed home 7 goals and assisted on 15 
others to complete the year with 22 
points. Other top scorers who returned 
were: Lori Kelfer (5 goals 8 assists 13 
points), Cecilia Moreno (7-1-8) and 
Shannon Murphy (5-1-6). 

The backbone of the defense, goal- 
keeper Cathy O'Brien, also returned to 
the squad. O'Brien was impressive in 
1984 as she obtained an impressive 1.16 
goals against average, while register- 
ing 6 shutouts. 

when Morett was asked as to her 
overview of the 1984 season, she re- 
sponded, "Above all, the team now 
knows they're winners; they feel they can 
play with the best." 

— Keith Gnazzo 



Peter Klidaras 

76 / Sports 



Hockey 




Peter Klidaras 



Peter Klidaras 



Sports / 77 



Women's Soccer 



Ever since BC implemented a 
women's soccer program, the quality 
and caliber of the play, as well as the 
players, improved each year. 

Under the guidance of new head 
coach Suzanna Kaplan, the women 
were scheduled to compete against 
many of the top soccer teams in the 
United States. Among these top teams 
included #2 ranked UConn, #3 UMass, 

// a *~\ _ i i _ s-\ _n_ _i 11 r* i _ _ _i 



Cortland State. 

After losing two tough overtime 
games to UVM and UConn, the women 
jumped right back on their feet to begin 
their procession to the top of the ladder, 
in hopes of making the N.C.A.A. tourna- 
ment and their ultimate goal — ,v the fin- 
al four in '84." 

The teams first great victory came in 
early September at the Cortland State 
Invitational Tournament. Battling three 
"top notch" teams in two days, the 
women Eagles were honored with the 
first place trophy. 

Under the leadership of co-captains 



Kathy Brophy and Peggy Fleming, the 
women continued to grow and learn 
together to produce a top ranked na- 
tional team. 



"The time has come 
for us to play so let us 



:<;¥• i ■ ii i m i (ci (•] •] c i 



Lord help us do the 
best we can, and go 
real hard until the 



end: 



(C. D'Entremont] 



Anchoring the defense throughout the 
season were Senior goalkeeper Kathy 
Brophy and the unbeatable Chris D'E- 
ntremont. Juniors Patty Hill, Karyn Hesse 



and Sophomore Maria Montouri all con- 
tributed to make one of the strongest 
backfields in women's soccer today. 
Performing in the midfield spots were: 
Lynne Collins, Peggy Fleming, Jenn Fitz- 
patrick and Betsy Ready. Senior wingers 
Cathy Murphy, Ann Porell and striker 
Martha MacNamara took care of the 
scoring opportunities. 
Seven of the team's varsity players 



and leadership carried the veteran 
team to a most memorable season. 

This team not only had fun on the field, 
but they also enjoyed their friendships 
off of the field. It made no difference if 
you were the number one player on the 
team or the twenty-third. In each others' 
eyes everyone was equal. They were a 
team of hard work and fun. And a team 
any athlete would want to be a part of. 
— Peggy Fleming (Co-captain) 




Andy Ryan 
78 / Sports 




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80 / Sports 




The Height's 



The 1984-85 edition of the women's 
tennis team at Boston College was 
something special. Relying on freshmen 
in four of the ten spots on the varsity 
roster, the team had a questionable out- 
look. But, any questions were laid to rest 
by an impressive fall campaign for the 
Eagle nefwomen as they posted a flaw- 
less 8-0 record. 

The spring looked promising as the 
Eagles closed out the fall season with a 
Second Place finish at the Big East 
Championships in Syracuse, and then a 
victory at the New England Cham- 
pionships in Vermont. 

The Eagles were paced by, of course, 
their number one seed, who happened 
to be the unbeatable junior Katie 
Molumphy, who posted an impressive 
24-4 record in the fall season. Included 
in those merits, Molumphy copped the 
Big East and New England individual 
titles. 

The next two seeds were freshmen, 
but they didn't play as though they were 
newcomers to the college courts. Amy 
Richardson and Lisa Rosamilia com- 
bined for an incredible 39-7 record, and 
they both captured victories in their 
flights in both the Big East tourney and 
the New England's. 

The fall season went extremely well for 
the Eagles as their closest match came 
against Dartmouth. Even though the 
score was 5-4, the Eagles had gone 5-1 
in the singles part of the match so when 
the doubles play started, the ladies 
already had the victory wrapped up. 

But, the Eagles success did not rely on 
just the top three ladies. The rest of the 
squad combined for a record of 58-27 
to round out the fall success of the Bos- 
ton College's women tennis team. 

Rounding out the top six seeds for the 
Eagles at the end of the fall season were 
Julie Walsh, Heidi Kunichika, and Nanett 
Hansen. Nanett had an unblemished 6- 
record in singles competition. She also 
happened to be the elder stateswoman 
of the team as she was the only senior on 
the squad. Hansen served as a responsi- 
ble captain during the 1984-85 season. 

Christine Callahan and Lynn Christ- 
man led the way for the Eagles in the 
doubles competition as they won the 
Second Doubles Flight in the New Eng- 
land tournament. 

Howard Singer continued his success 
as mentor of the Women's Tennis team 
at Boston College. With the best autumn 
of his college coaching career, Singer's 
overall record at BC blossomed to an 
impressive 43-16 record. 

After a tremendous fall season, Singer 
and his women's team looked forward 
to an even more successful spring of 
1985. 

— Keith Gnazzo 



Sports / 81 



Men's 




Peter Kildaras 



r 



Peter Klidaras 



82 / Sports 



Soccer 




After beginning the season with an 
anemic 1-5-1 record, the Boston College 
men's soccer resurrected itself, going 6- 
3-2 in their final games to finish at a 
respectable 7-8-3. 

Coach Ben Brewster summed up this 
upswing finish by stating, "We played 
two seasons. We were 1-5-1 in the first 
and 6-3-2 in the second." The key game 
to the team's turnaround was the 2-1 de- 
feat of rival Harvard. He said, "We really 
made the most of our chances in this 
game; we played very timely soccer." 

Brewster was extremely happy with 
the team's turnabout by stating, "We 
could've quit after our tough start, but 
the guys didn't and they gelled into a 
good unit." 

Victories along the comeback trail in- 
cluded wins over Harvard, Merrimack, 
Vermont, Northeastern, Holy Cross, and 
BU. The only poor performance in the 
second half of the season was at the 
hands of Big East power Providence, 
who thrashed the Eagles 3-0. 

In the scoring department, the Eagles 
were led by injury-riddled Steve Masiel- 
lo, who notched 6 goals in only 10 



games of action. Co-captain Paul Con- 
nors finished second in team scoring by 
netting 4 goals to go along with 2 assists 
to finish with 10 points. 

Moving to the department of defense, 
the goaltending duties were split by Eric 
Hasbun and Mike Wood. Hasburn played 
the first part of the year and wound 
up 4-6-1 with a 1 .69 Goals Against Aver- 
age (GAA), while Wood came on in the 
latter stages of the campaign to post a 
3-2-2-mark with a 1.04 GAA. 

The Eagles had outstanding years 
from many players, especially Eric Wise 
and Eric Brown on the defensive aspects 
of the game. Others who garnished 
praise for their performances were 
Jacob Lehrer, Scott Jones, and co- 
captains Connors and Ed Capobianco. 

Brewster felt the losing start was good 
for the team in a way. He said, "Most of 
these guys on this team had never ex- 
perienced losing. I feel like this team 
was similar to Jack Bicknell's first as 
coach at BC His team was 1-5, then 
turned around to finish up at 5-6. Hope- 
fully our future will be as successful as the 
football team's." 

— Keith Gnazzo 




Peter Klidaras 



Sports / 83 




Clubs 




Peter Hillenbrand 




84 / Sports 




Makis latridis 



Sports / 85 



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Intramurals 




Andy Ryan 

Since Boston College was a Division 
One school in major college athletics, 
many superior high school athletes 
didn't even get a chance to show their 
talents on the teams at this university. But 
most people did not realize that much 
of that pool of talent participated in in- 
terschool athletics known as intramurals. 
In the fall of 1984-85, the number of 
students who were a part of the intra- 
mural program numbered 2674 strong, 
including men and women, From an 
amazing 862 participants in Men's Bas- 
ketball and 712 members in Touch Foot- 
ball to a miniscule 16 participants in the 
Field Goal Kicking Contest, Boston Col- 
lege had its share of intramural athletes. 
The intramural athlete had the unique 
mixture of taking his / her sport seriously 
and also having a good time doing it. 
For instance, how many non-serious 
athletes would get up at 6:00 AM once 
a week for a hockey game. Keeping this 



in mind, one had to believe that these 
people were serious about their intra- 
mural team. On the other hand, these 
teams did not run wind sprints and hold 
vigorous practice sessions as the Varsity 
Teams did. 

Speaking of football, the 1984-85 fall 
season boasted 51 teams, with such 
wacky names as Jerry's Kids and the Rat 
Packers. But, these teams were not 
wacky on the field. Out of the 24 teams 
which qualified for the playoffs, 4 of 
them ventured in undefeated. They 
were Bloke's Revenge, Spread Eagles, 
Thrust, and the Dwad Squad. In the tour- 
nament itself, the undefeated Dwad 
Squad battled its way into the finals to 
face a rugged team known as the 
Gamecocks (who posted a 7-1 regular 
season record]. November 18, 1984 was 
the date and Alumni Field was the site 
as the underdog Gamecocks shut out 
the unbeaten Dwad Squad 10-0. 



The 1984 Coed Softball League had 
26 teams numbering 429 participants. 
The Jungle Survivors did just that during 
the regular season, finishing with the 
only unblemished record in the league. 
The Jungle Survivors had no trouble 
reaching the Championship Game 
where they met inter-division foe Marvin 
and the Swagglers. But, the Survivors 
couldn't stay alive in the finals as they 
were dominated 18-3 by the victorious 
Swagglers. 

The Women's Volleyball League end- 
ed up with 9 teams, of which Marvena 
and the Swagglets finished the regular 
season with a perfect 14-0 record. Their 
main competition would be the Fig 
Newtons, who finished the season at 14- 
2. But the Swagglets polished off the Fig 
Newtons in the semi-finals 2 games to 1 
on the road to a 3-0 victory over the Mod 
Squad in the finals. 

— Keith Gnazzo 

Sports / 87 



Geoff Why 

Coming off a disappointing 11-16 
record in 1983-84, the Boston College 
women's basketball team looked to 
make a significant improvement during 
the 1984-85 season. 

This optimism was based upon sever- 
al factors. One was the return of four 
starters from the 1983-84 team, including 
juniorforward Sally Madeira who led the 
Eagles in scoring and rebounding in the 
previous season. Also returning were 
seniors Biz Haughton and Jane Haub- 
rich, and sophomore Pam Thornton. 

Five other players also returned to the 
squad for the 1984-85 season. Increas- 
ing BC's potential for success was the 
addition of BU junior transfer Morie Grant 
and Freshman Ann O'Doy and Mary 
Gervais. O'Doy a 57" point guard from 
Connecticut, was named to the Big 
East's pre-season all freshman team. 

Even with all the laureates, the ladies 
still had to put the ball through the hoop 



on the court. At the time of press, the 
Eagles were an 11-5 squad with a 5-2 
mark in the Big East. 

The Eagles jumped out to a 3-0 start 
with victories over foes such as Brown, 
UMass and the University of New Hamp- 
shire. Next it was on the the University of 
Detroit Classic against some nationally 
ranked teams. The Eagles lost the open- 
er to UDetroit 66-48, but bounced back 
to take third place with a 55-47 win over 
Cheyney State. 

The Eagles split their final two games 
before Big East play to have a 5-2 
record going into league competition. 
They trounced Harvard 75-49 but lost a 
heartbreaker to BU 68-67, despite a 
tremendous 20 point performance by 
O'Doy who led BC scorers with a 12.5 
average. 

After a win over UConn and one over 
Northeastern, the Eagles were 
awakened to the big time, as they were 



destroyed by highly touted Penn State, 
85-43. 

BC upped their record to 10-3 with 
victories over St. John's, Providence and 
Syracuse. But, that streak was ended as 
the Eagles lost in Philadelphia to the 
league-leading Villanova Wildcats. 
'Nova's 57-50 victory gave BC its first 
conference loss. 

Heartbreak stuck once again as the 
Panthers from Pittsburgh hit a last-second 
jumper to give the Panthers a 53-52 vic- 
tory over the hard-luck Eagles. 

After the loss to Pitt, the Eagles did 
come back and soundly whip George- 
town 59-50, to have a 5-2, 11-5 record as 
the book went to press. 

The Eagles looked for continued suc- 
cess throughout the 1984-85 season, to 
finish up with an impressive campaign. 
— Terence Connors 



88 / Sports 



Basketball 




Geoff Why 



Sports / 89 




Basketball 



Makis latridis 

90 / Sports 




Peter Klidaras 

After coming off a rugged 18-12 sea- 
son mired with controversy and strug- 
gles, the outlook for the 1984-85 cam- 
paign was not all that positive. Add that 
to the fact that BC was losing its leading 
scorer and rebounder, Jay Murphy [19.8 
points per game and 7.3 rebounds per 
game] and also the ever consistent 
Martin Clark (10.8 ppg, 6.4 rpg] and BC 
was picked to finish between fifth and 
seventh in the Big East. 

Michael Adams (17.3 ppg), Stu Primus 
(7.0 ppg) and Roger McCready (9.5 
ppg) would have to pick up the scoring 
slack which would be missed from the 
two leaving veterans. But, that factor 
had to be diminished slightly as senior 
Primus was declared academically in- 
eligible for the first five games. BC had to 
look for a new combination. 

But, on the I ighter side, the Eagles had 



made some decent recruits from the off- 
season. One of the keys was junior col- 
lege transfer, Trevor Gordon, who would 
be the Eagles 'giant' at 6-9. His presence 
would allow Roger McCready to move 
back to his more natural position of for- 
ward, after battling for an undersized 
year in the middle at 6-5. Out of the Jay 
Murphy mold came Skip Barry, a 6-7 
forward who had the potential to shoot 
the nets out of a basketball hoop. BC's 
two other recruits included 6-8 forward 
Tyrone Scott who was known as a leaper 
and rebounder, and the pesky little 
guard from Providence, Rhode Island, 
Jamie Benton, who was in the mold of 
John Bagley. 

The starting lineup was to consist of 
four veterans and the new man in the 
middle. The guard combination of cap- 
tain Adams and the speedy Dominic 



Pressley was one of the quickest in the 
country. The forward line would be 
McCready and senior Terence Talley. 
McCready was a smart player inside 
who always knew where the basket was 
and how to draw the foul. Talley, on the 
other hand, was not known for his scoring 
but for his defensive work. He was a 
scrapper, who always gave his all, 
game in and game out. In the middle 
Gordon was the presumed starter with 
6-8 sophomore Troy Bowers to see a lot 
of playing time off the bench. 

The Eagles opener went as expected 
as they routed their annual early season 
foe, the New Hampshire Wildcats 86-63. 
Adams darted around the court to pour 
in 24 points while the impressive 
McCready added 23. An inspiring per- 
formance was given by starting guard 
Pressley, who netted 10 points, grabbed 
8 boards and dished out 5 assists. 

But, the Eagles would get an early 
season test as they went to the Garden 
to take on the highly touted Demon- 
Deacons of Wake Forest and the ACC. 
The speedy backcourt of Adams and 
Pressley was good for 35 points and they 
helped the Eagles overcome a second- 
half deficit and win the game 82-76. 
Another star emerged from the contest, 
as freshman Barry proved he was a 
shooter, dumping in 12 points, mostly 
from the outside. 

The Eagles had a big win under their 
belts and they traveled to Brown for their 
next contest. Talley led the way on the 
boards for the second straight game 
with 10 to go along with his 11 points. 
Adams and Pressley this time combined 
for 40 points to lead the offensive attack 
as the Eagles scored 90-70. 

It was home to Roberts for their opener 
to take on Stonehill. The Eagles had little 
trouble in defeating Stonehill 98-71 as 
Dominic Pressley netted 19 points for the 
second straight game. Pressley was 
averaging 17.0 ppg after the first four 
after only scoring 4.4 the previous year. 
His newly found offensive output bright- 
ened the hopes for the 4-0 Eagles. 
Another bright spot for BC was the inspir- 
ational shooting of freshman Benton 
who showed his scoring ability by sink- 
ing 10 points. 

BC's next game was against surprising 
Rhode Island. The Eagles won this one in 
usual fashion but did now show the flair 
that they were capable of. It was an 
uneventful 70-50 win with many stretch- 
es of scorelessness throughout the 
game. McCready led the way with 19 
points. 

Traditional rivals were always tough 
teams to beat, no matter who had more 
talent. Such was the case against Holy 
Cross as the Eagles had to come from 
behind to defeat the Crusaders 85-63 in 
a game which was closer than the score 
indicates. Adams and Pressley con- 
tinued their teamwork for 37 more points 
to lead the Eagle offense. This was also 
an important day as Stu Primus came 
back to the lineup to net 6 points, but 
more importantly, he would be the sixth 

Sports / 91 



(continued from page 91} 
man for the remainder of the season. 
Trevor Gordon had his first double fi- 
gures game, scoring 10 points and 
also adding to his experience in the 
middle which he would need when 
Big East play began. 

The Eagles had one more game 
before they travelled to San Diego for 
the Cabrillo Classic and their second 
true test of the season. The victim was 
Randloph-Macon as the Eagles 
completely annihalated them 87-43. 
Barry once again produced scoring 
in double figures for the fourth time in 
the young season. Gordon netted his 
season-high 13 points and the Eagles 
were 7-0 heading out west. 

Critics believed that the Eagles 
would finally fall from the unbeatens 
in this Christmas tourney. The opener, 
against highly rated Michigan State, 
proved to be a thriller with Eagles 
pulling it out 82-78. Michael Adams' 



clutch play was key as he had 19 
points and 5 assists. Adams garnered 
tournament MVP honors as he had 23 
points and 6 assists in the championship 
victory over TCU 92-75. Roger 
McCready had a superb game, scoring 
a season-high 31 points to lead the way. 
Were the Eagles for real? Well they were 
9-0 as they headed for their biggest 
challenge, The Big East. 

BC opened at RoPerts against the 
Friars from Providence and downed 
them 67-55. McCready was high man 
once again with 16 points and the now 
consistent Barry added 12. 

It was time for the real test as the 
Eagles travelled to the nation's capitol 
to challenge unbeaten and number one 
ranked Georgetown. Fouls mired the 
Eagles but they stayed with this Hoya 
team causing an overtime session. BC 
couldn't get the lead in OT and the 
Hoyas barely avoided the upset, 82-80. 
The backcourt combo combined for 39 



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Peter Klidaras 

92 / Sports 



Peter Klidaras 




Makis latridis 

Sports / 93 



I 




Makis latridis 

94 / Sports 







Peter Klidaras 



Sports / 95 




Makis latridis 

96 / Sports 



(continued from page 92) 

points to go along with Primus' 14 in the 

upset Pid. 

After the emotional victory over the 
Hoyas, the drained Eagles let one slip 
away Pefore 28,000 fans in Syracuse. A 
nine point second half lead dwindled at 
the hands of Pearl Washington and the 
Eagles were 10-2 with a disappointing 
64-58 loss to Syracuse, 

The Eagles seemed to be a different 
club as they had trouble at home de- 
feating Seton Hall, 69-66 in a game 
which saw the 'waterbug' Adams score 
24 points to lead the Eagle offense. 

The next three games proved dis- 
astrous for the Eagles, as they dropped 
them all, including an unheard of loss to 
Pitt at Roberts Center. Villanova clawed 
the Eagles in Philly 85-66, as BC suffered 
its worse loss in over a year. Next it was to 
the Garden again to take on second- 
ranked Saint John's of the Queens. BC 



squandered a big second-half lead 
only to fall down again 66-59 in front of a 
national television audience. The low- 
point of the season came on January 
21st against Pitt. BC saw a 13 point 
second-half lead evaporate as fresh- 
man Charles Smith scored 27 points, 19 
from the charity stripe, to set a Big East 
record. BC lost 61-55 to drop to 11-5 and 
2-5 in the Big East. 

But, the Eagles did not fold, running off 
a string of five straight victories culminat- 
ing with a win over Syracuse. Along the 
way, victories came over UConn (an OT 
thriller), Hartford, Northeastern and Pro- 
vidence. The Syracuse game topped 
them all. BC went into its usual trend, 
taking a 7 point second-half lead and 
slcwly letting it slip away. This time Syra- 
cuse took the lead 66-65 with under a 
minute to play. It seemed over when 
Rony Seikaly went to the line with :06 left 
in the game. He missed the front end of a 



one-and-one end Michael Adams was 
miraculously fouled with one tick left. 
Adams pleased the 10,436 fans as he hit 
two free throws to throw the Garden into 
a frenzy 67-66. 

Georgetown was coming to town 
and the Eagles were ready for the team 
that had now lost 2 straight Big East 
games. The Eagles rallied from an 11 
point deficit to pull within one, but it 
would not hold as the Hoyas took com- 
mand and defeated the Eagles 78-66. 

The Eagles were 16-6, 5-6 in the Big 
East as the season went down the 
homestretch. The NCAA tournament 
was a good possibility as was the 20 win 
plateau. The Eagles had once again 
responded to their role as underdog 
with an impressive regular season. Only 
time would tell what would happen in 
the post-season, 

— Keith Gnazzo 




Makis latridis 



Sports / 97 









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Makis latridis 

The men's track team, as the 
women's, was anchored by supportive 
coach, Jack (Track) McDonald. Mc- 
Donald brought back a mixture of 
veterans and new blood into the 1984- 
85 season with bright optimism. 

The team was led by senior Craig 
Coffey, who led the team in spirit as 
well as demonstration. One of the high- 
lights of Coffey's final campaign was 
the Greater Boston Championships as 
he broke the point total in his victorious 
pentathalon performance. Coffey 
scored 3,661 points breaking the 
record set the previous year by, you 
guessed it, Coffey himself. Coffey also 
excelled in the 60 yard hurdles and the 
mile relay. 

The big men of the Eagles track 
team were just that: BIG Jim Kenney 
was the key Eagle who soared in the 

100 / Sports 



weight throw, while senior football full- 
back Jim Browne did a respectable 
job with the shot put. 

Ray Hawkins, a sophomore, was 
BC's specialist in the jumps, as he com- 
peted in both the long and triple 
jumps. 

As for the runners, the Eagles were 
led by John Clopeck, who copped the 
1984 Greater Boston Championship 
and New England Championship in 
the two-mile event. Also aiding in the 
cause were Paul Plissey (long dis- 
tance), Rob Davis (sprints) and Ross 
Muscato (sprints). 

With another year of experience 
under their Pelts, the Boston College 
men's track team continued to im- 
prove and become a formidable op- 
ponent in the East. 




|HMM 








Track and Field 




Makis latridis 

Sports / 101 




The women's track team of Boston 
College was looking forward to its 
seventh season at the Heights under the 
direction of coach Jack McDonald. It 
was a team which had captured the 
Greater Boston Track and Field Cham- 
pionships for the first time the previous 
year. 

But, what was McDonald to expect for 
the 1984-85 season at Boston College. 
Well, for starters, McDonald spoke high- 
ly of Ihe franchise," Leslie Freeman and 
Janice Reid. 

Freeman, a junior, was mainly a sprin- 
ter, as she specialized in the 220 yard 
dash, the 60 yarder and 880 relay. 

Reid ran the individual 440, anchored 
the relay 880 and ran the mile relay, all 
as a sophomore. 

But, no team was complete without a 
leader and that lady was captain Susan 
Goode. Not only was Goode captain of 
the forces, she was also the New Eng- 
land pentathalon champion. 

Other key contributors were Beverly 
Luken (sprints), Therese Doucette (long 
distance), Mary Mooney (long dis- 
tance), Mary Helen Peterson (long dis- 
tance), Carolyn Conigliaro (long dis- 
tance), Lisa Wilkins (long jump), 
Marybeth Paul (high jump) and Virginia 
Connors (long Distance). 

One of the highlights of the 1984-85 
season was the women's defense of the 
Greater Boston Championships as they 
edged out Boston University 88.5 to 80.5 
on the last day. After winning that co- 
veted prize, the women looked forward 
to the New England's, the Big East and 
the NCAA Championships. 



Women's 




Makis latridis 



102 / Sports 




Track and Field 




Sports / 103 




Makis latridis 



104 / Sports 




The 1984-85 season for the Boston Col- 
lege wrestling team looked promising 
under the guidance of second-year 
mentor Joseph Guinta. Coming off a 
solid 5-2 year and with fourteen return- 
ing lettermen, success was imminent for 
the new season. 

As for members, the team consisted of 
four seniors, John Hanlon, Bill Kaliff, Dan 
Murner, and Carl Traylor; two juniors, 
Robert Fitzgerald and Joseph Traggert, 
five sophomores, Mark DeAngelis, 
Thomas Giachetto, Ted Hughes, Eric 
Sherbacow, and John Zogby, and also 
two freshmen, Bill Gallucci and Tim Mar- 
tins. 

The three keys to the success of this 
team relied on three top seniors: Hanlon, 
Murner, and Traylor. Hanlon, in the 167 
pound class, had quite a successful his- 
tory. He had already been a two-time 
New England Champion and a three- 
time NCAA qualifier. Hanlon had done 
all this in his first three years. He posted 
an 18-2 record in 1983-84 and was also 
the New England All-Star Meet Winner. 

Another key was Murner. Murner par- 
ticipated in the 177 pound weight class 
and he posted a 14-5-2 record in 1983- 
84. In 1983, Murner also had a great year 
as he was crowned the New England 



Champion. 

The other major veteran on the 1984- 
85 squad was Traylor. Traylor posted an 
18-2 record in his junior year participat- 
ing in the 150 pound weight class. Traylor 
also won the New England All-Star 
Meet. 

But, three men does not a wrestling 
team make, and BC was no exception. 
This team had eleven other returning let- 
termen who proved their value the pre- 
vious season as the Eagles copped third 
place in the post-season tournament. 

Along with all the experience on the 
sauad, the Eagles received two top re- 
cruits from the high school ranks. Tim 
Martins entered Boston College coming 
off a 30-0 senior season which included 
the Idaho State High School Champion- 
ship in the 142 pound weight class. The 
other blue-chipper was William Galluc- 
ci who posted a 25-2 senior season. His 
merits included the New Jersey High 
School Regional Championship for the 
134 pound weight class. 

With a lot of experience and a good 

influx of new talent, the 1984-85 edition 

of the Wrestling Team at Boston College 

looked to be a strong one at the Heights. 

— Keith Gnazzo 




Makis latridis 



Sports / 105 



Women's 



The Boston College Women's Ice 
Hockey Team had come a long way. 
Over the past ten years, the lady Eagles 
had grown to become a fine addition to 
the great athletic tradition at the 
Heights. 

Led by senior tri-captains Judy Ahern, 
Kerry O'Connell, and Liz White, the 1984- 
85 women's team had a large number 
of new, talented players joining the re- 
turning skaters. The 1984-85 team was 
coached by senior Robert O'Brien 
assisted by Albert Wisialko. Their 'solid' 
first year coaching had brought 
tremendous enthusiasm to this very 
young team. 

The defense was led by Kerry O'Con- 
nell. Over her three year tenure at BC, 
Kerry had matured into a powerful point 
with excellent defensive instincts. Joining 
Kerry on defense were returning players 
Judy Ahern and Kris Smith, both moving 
to the defensive line from the wing posi- 
tion. Joining the veterans at the defen- 
sive end were juniors Lisa Kiley and Anne 
Marie Linehan and also three quick 
talented freshmen. 

The forward line was one of the 



strongest the Eagles had in the past few 
years. Joining four year veteran Liz White 
with newcomers Peggy Fleming and 
Linda Griffin proved to be a great move 
made by Coach O'Brien. The three ska- 
ters learned very quickly to skate 
together mixing Liz's talent and experi- 
ence with Peggy and Linda's fancy stick 
work and power. Coach O'Brien also 
made a valuable move by sending 
Sheryl Wakins to the forward line. Her 
speed and strong desire to score fit in 
well with the front line style. 

The 1984-85 team alternated be- 
tween sophomore goalies Jackie Caine 
and Sue Hughey. Both girls showed 
tremendous natural ability and instincts 
and throughout the season both goalies 
made spectacular saves that proved 
them both to be very capable shot- 
blockers. 

The highlight of the season was the 
annual Beanpot. The teams from North- 
eastern, Harvard, Boston University and 
Boston College played in the annual 
tourney which proved to be very fast 
and exciting to all those involved. 

— Judy Ahern 



r 



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Hockey 




Makis latridis 



Sports / 107 




BC hockey had just enjoyed one of its 
most productive Seasons in 1983-84, 
compiling a 26-13 record, by far its win- 
ningest season in a long time. There 
were still questions despite their overall 
success. Injuries hampered BC through- 
out the season. Bob Sweney, a junior, 
missed 16 games due to injury. Sweeney 
was the MVP of BC's 1983 Beanpot 
championship team and was sorely 
missed at times. A big step was taken 
with the formation of the seven team 
Hockey East and its coalition with the 
WCHA. BC was faced with its toughest 
schedule ever and offense would be a 
key in matchups against the midwestern 
clubs. The focus of recruiting would be 
to land some offensive minded for- 
wards, and they went out and got them. 
Leading the pack was Ken Hodge Jr. of 
St. John's Prep, along with Billy Kopecky, 
Austin Prep, Dan Shea, BC High, John 
Devereaux, Scituate High, Chris Staple- 
ton, New Prep, Michael Gervasi, 
Weymouth North, and defenseman Joe 
McEachern of Division I champion 
Matignon. It was hoped that this was the 
crop that would bring the national 
championship. 

BC began its season with six returning 
seniors, led by captain Tim Mitchell and 
alternate David Livingston, who were 
linemates along with Dan Shea. The 
Eagles got off to an inauspicious start, 
standing at 7-5 after twelve games, 
while suffering two humilating defeats at 
the hands of the Golden Gophers of 
Minnesota. Outscored 12-4, the Eagles 
were not producing offensively and de- 
fensively they were becoming very 
porous, Despite scoring 61 goals (5.0 
goals per game], the maroon and gold 
surrendered 54. The highlights of the first 
two months were an opening night vic- 
tory over the Huskies of Northeastern, a 
6-3 victory over BU, and a 5-0 
whitewashing of Providence. 

Over the course of the next month, the 
Eagles began to gell. The team was 
playing very balanced hockey, both 
offensively and defensively. The goal- 
tending combo of Scott Gordon, Sean 
Real and Joe Donovan was superb. 
They posted a 10-1-1 record over the next 
twelve games, giving them a 17-6-1 
record overall along with a Hockey East 
leading 15-6 and 30 points. Since suffer- 
ing an 8-4 loss to Minnesota-Duluth, the 
Eagles were 6-2 including a victory over 
the same Minnesota-Duluth club, win- 
ning 4-2. Highlights of the season up to 
this point were coach Len Ceglarski's 
500th career win, a ranking of 4th 
nationally and the emergence of the 
second line, centered by Ken Hodge Jr. 
flanked by junior Doug Brown and soph- 
omore Kevin Stevens. The major dis- 
appointment was a last-place finish in 

108 / Sports 



Men's 





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(continued from page 108] 

the Beanpot, as the Eagles were eaten 
up 4-2 by the Northeastern Huskies and 
then edged 6-5 by Harvard in the con- 
solation contest. 

The strength of the team thus far had 
been its uncanny ability to put the pick 
in the net. The team was averaging an 
incredible 5.9 gpg. Defensively they 
were solid, allowing on the average 3.8 
gpg. Over the last 20 games, BC had 
posted a 16-3-1 record and the goals 
against had dropped to about 3.4 per 
game. National ranking and the Bean- 
pot were now afterthoughts and the re- 
mainder of the season (and postsea- 
son?) laid ahead. 

The similarities of the two teams, 1984 
and 1985, had been mentioned. The 
1985 version seemed to be more offen- 
sive-minded, more aggressive along 
the boards, and, at times hungrier than 
past teams. In recent years BC had 
been a team that relied on defense and 
backchecking. The concentration of 
offense let loose weapons like Scott Har- 
low (27 goals — 29 assists — 56 points) 
and linemate Bob Sweeney (26-25-51) 
as well as fellow junior Doug Brown (25- 
26-51, 5 power play goals, 5 short- 
handed goals). Two freshman came 
into their own as collegiate scorers and 
two more were on the rise. The freshman 
were led by Hodge (15-37-52) and Dan 
Shea (13-16-29). These two played on 
the power play as well as the first two 
lines all yearlong. Billy Kopecky (6-10-16) 
and Chris Stapleton (6-6-12) provided 
coach Ceglarski with a steady check- 
ing line centered by senior Jim Herlihy 
(8-13-21). The consistent play of the four 
lines had been a welcome blessing for 
the coach, who in previous years felt 
fortunate when he had two healthy lines. 
With the addition of the fresh recruits, 
playing time had been very difficult to 
distribute. 

The defense was anchored by Domi- 
nic Campedelli (4-36-40), Bob Emery (2- 



8-10) and John McNamara (3-5-8), all 
juniors, as well as seniors George Boud- 
reau (1-2-3) and Bruce "Sizzle" Milton 
(2-10-12). Junior Michael Barron (2-3-5) 
scored the first two goals of his collegi- 
ate career and played steadily on the 
backline. Sophomore John McLean (2- 
7-9), although inconsistent at times, was 
beginning to come into his own when 
academics forced him out for the re- 
mainder of the season. Sophomore 
David Whyte and freshman Joe 
McEachern played well at times, but 
were inconsistent due to lack of experi- 
ence. Michael Gervasi, a freshman, 
went from wing to defense and was the 
probable replacement for McNamara 
or Campedelli after they graduated 
Gervasi (1-6-7) suffered from the switch 
back and forth but should improve with 
increased playing time. 

Goaltending had been a very consis- 
tent area for this unit. Junior Scott Gor- 
don showed flashes of brilliance and 
only recently displayed his newly de- 
veloped weapon, the quick glove 
hand. Gordon (19-7-1) shouldered the 
burden for most of the last two seasons. 
Sean Real (4-1 , 3.36 goals against aver- 
age) had proven to be a more than 
adequate back-up and had the well- 
deserved confidence of the coaching 
staff. Joe Donovan saw limited action 
but provided valuable insurance in the 
event of an injury. 

The long term goals of the players and 
coaching staff remained the same. The 
idea was to win Hockey East and cap- 
ture a berth in the NCAA Final Four. The 
next step would logically be to win the 
national championship. Legitimately 
three teams stood in their way: Michi- 
gan State, RPI and Minnesota-Duluth. 
One could be sure the Eagles would be 
flying high in February and March. And 
they said hockey took a back seat to 
Doug Flutie and football at the Heights. 
— Richard Neary 




Peter Klidaras 



Sports/ 113 



With the winter must come snow, and 
with snow the skiers. Once again for 
1984-85 Boston College possessed two 
nationally ranked ski teams. The fact 
that they didn't receive as much publici- 
ty as they might deserve does not marr 
the list of accomplishments that the 
team 'chalked up' throughout the 
season. 

The magnitude of the ski teams' 
potential for the '84- '85 season was real- 
ized early in that the men were ranked 
number one in a preseason poll. The 
women, also highly respectable in their 
efforts, were ranked seventh nationally 
the week of January twenty-first. 

Such noteriety and accomplishment 
did not come without talent. The men 
had the services of several outstanding 
athletes throughout the season. Among 
them were, Mike Leider, John Cough- 
Ian, Jeff Lewis, freshman George 
Abdow, John Crowley, and Eric Vanson. 
There were triumphs and set backs but 



as was the case with any truly unified 
team, there seemed always to be 
someone to pick up the slack for Boston 
College. Evidence of this was January 
twenty-sixth when, as a result of an injury 
to Leider, Jeff Lewis filled in and posted 
a respectable sixteenth place finish in a 
league race at Waterville, New Hamp- 
shire. 

The women's arsenal included Laura 
Hourihan (captain), Ingrid Vanson, Cor- 
nie Ryan, Monica Connell, and Tara 
Glackin, The team could be especially 
proud of the performance of its fresh- 
men members, Ryan, Glackin, and 
Connell in particular, who nonsistantly 
finished in the top fifteen. 

'84-'85 was a success, and more of 
the same could be expected in the fu- 
ture especially in light of the young tal- 
ent which Boston College skiing pos- 
sessed. 

— Tony Cammarota 




David Monahan 

114 / Sports 




Skiing 




David Monahan 

Sports / 115 



Men's Swimming 






Although suffering a loss in its opening 
meet, the men's swimming team went 
on to win the two following meets to start 
the 1984-85 swimming season. 

Putting Villanova behind them, BC 
went on to face Worcester Polytech. The 
WPI meet was a boost in morale for the 
Eagle squad. Team captain, Lonnie 
Quinn performed well in the 1000 frees- 
tyle and 200 backstroke to lead the 
team to an outstanding victory. Fellow 
seniors Al Lawrence and Mark McCul- 
lagh added strong showings in the 200 
butterfly. 

The BC verses Providence College 
meet was one in which BC proved its 
superiority over its Big East rival. While 
swimming somewhat off events, Lonnie 



Quinn was the winner of the 50 and 100 
freestyle and lead-off swimmer in the 
winning medley relay. Al Lawrence 
swam to a strong second place finish in 
the 200 backstroke. Duke Moloney 
twisted and piked for a graceful first 
place in the 1-meter optional diving 
events while also placing second in the 
1-meter required competition as well. 

Over Christmas break in Puerto Rico, 
the senior squad worked very hard in 
swimming as well as in bringing the 
team together to form a strong unit, In 
addition to serious training, the squad 
performed well at the Donee Copa 
Navidad. 

Returning to Boston to face long-time 
rival URI, the team was high-spirited and 



looking great. Although losing a close 
meet to URI, great swims were abun- 
dant. Captain Quinn placed third in the 
200 backstroke. McCullagh and Lawr- 
ence both performed strongly in their 
events, Duke Moloney competed to 
take secondplace in both 1 -meter and 
3-meter boards. 

Though the senior squad would be 
missed both in person and perfor- 
mance, the returning juniors were more 
than ready and able to take their place 
as leaders. Sophomores and freshmen 
both showed great potential to com- 
plete another great Eagle sguad in 
1985-86. 

— Kevin Foley , 







Peter Klidaras 

116 / Sports 




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Makis latridis 




Peter Klidaras 



Peter Klidaras 



Sports / 117 



Women's Swimming 



- 




Geoff Whv 

118 / Sports 



I 







The women's varsity swim team be- 
gan its season with a very competitive 
line-up against Villanova, Harvard, and 
Maine. Led by co-captains Mary Ken- 
nedy and Denise Callahan, the Eagles 
were looking forward to a great year. 

Opening the season was the Pen- 
tathalon, an intersquad meet in which 
all the swimmers showed impressive 
times. Senior Denise Callahan stole the 
show and racked up the points to be the 
women's individual winner. 

Next was the BC co-ed relays in which 
the women combined their efforts with 
their male counterparts. The 11th annual 
event was further enhanced by the 
addition of Norwich University, Provi- 
dence College and the nemesis, the 
University of Connecticut. 

NCAA Division II swim rankings as of 
January placed co-captain Denise 
Callahan second in the 100 backstroke 
and fellow senior Christine Alola seventh 
in the 200 back. Veteran Tara McKenna 
was in second for the 100 breaststroke 
and also first in the 200 breast. 

Newcomers Suzy Sullivan, a freestyle 
sprinter, Kristen Murphy, a breaststroker 



and Kathy Koval, a butterflyer quickly 
placed themselves among the top 
ranked. Mary Kennedy held a solid first 
and second in the 1000 and 500 free- 
styles according to NEW ISDA top 25 
times. Senior Linda Dixon was holding 
high in the ranks in the 100 and 200 
breaststrokes. Liz O'Keefe was also 
doing well in the backstroke events. 

Siobhan Sheehan, the only senior di- 
ver, continued to master the three meter 
board, trying to break her previous 
record. Other veterans Diane Flaherty, 
Lauri Berkenkamp, Jane Feitelberg, 
Claire Madden, Sheila Malloy and diver 
Anne O'Brien, all juniors, were swimming 
hard and bettering times of the previous 
year. Sophomores Julie Churbuck, Shel- 
ly Erwin, Marybeth Jacobs and Erin Ler- 
sung added to a great effort. 

New additions were Julie Callahan, 
Kristen Achille, Kate Belavitch, Linda 
Gailus, Marianne Glynn, Cathy Glynn, 
Casey Jamieson, Katie Kennedy, Sonja 
Krusic, Marilyn Lamed, Colleen McFad- 
den and Mary Pawlack added to a thus 
far fun and eventful season. 

— Mike Cusack 




Geoff Why 



Sports / 119 




Women's 



Chris Hanley 

Under head coach Dawn Rice, the 
1984 Women's Volleyball team had a 
disappointing year, posting a dismal 4- 
33 record before the Big East Tourna- 
ment. 

It was basically a rebuilding year, or a 
training year for the youngsters to gain 
some valuable varsity experience, as six 



of the twelve members on the team 
were freshmen. 

Coming off a disappointing 7-23 
record in 1983, Rice didn't know what to 
expect on a team which was anchored 
by her three seniors, co-captains Jan 
Gibson and Karen McNulty and also 
Gerri Moriarty. They were the backbone 



of the team but beyond them there was 
not much college experience on the 
squad. 

Michelle Hanson was the only junior 
on the squad, while the only other up- 
perclassmen were sophomores Cheryl 
Carozza and Cathy Rieder. 

As for freshmen the team was loaded. 



120 / Spoils 



Volleyball 




(continued) from page 120 
They were Ani Leal, Diane Colaianni, 
Barbara Goll, Kris Andrew, Kristin LaPrise 
and Karen Ramsey. 

Even though the 1984 season was a 
disappointment, the youth on the Eagle 
squad should be a key for strong Eagle 
teams in 1985 and 1986. 

— Keith Gnazzo 




Chris Hanley 



Sports / 121 





k 




Finally 

"Magic Man does not work solo, and 
mirrors are not a part of his act. He may 
be the guy in the spotlight with all the 
glitter and pizazz, but keep an eye on 
his assistants," are the words Coach Bill 
Yeoman of the Houston Cougars repeat- 
ed to his team on numerous occa- 
sions, 

The name, Doug Flutie, has come up 
in almost every conversation about Bos- 
ton College football. But, was Doug Flu- 
tie the whole team? The BC Eagles 
proved that there were other ways to win 
a football game when Doug Flutie was 
playing a subpar game. The Eagles 
went to Dallas with one goal in mind: a 
BOWL victory. The Eagles did just that by 
beating the Houston Cougars in the 1985 
Cotton Bowl Classic: 45-28. 

The 1984 football season started with 
plenty of talk as to which bowl BC would 
be playing in. After the victory over Ala- 
bama, fans started thinking National 
Championship and New Year's Day 
bowl. The hopes to win the National 



• • • 

Championship were dashed with the 
losses to West Virginia and Penn State, 
but the talk of a bowl continued. Repre- 
sentatives from the Orange, Sugar, Cot- 
ton, and Fiesta Bowls started scouting 
the games early in the season. BC was 
high on everyone's list, but why not. We 
had the potential Heisman Trophy win- 
ner, an exciting football team, and of 
course, fans willing to support their 
team. 

Once BC beat Syracuse, a major de- 
cision had to be made. Which bowl bid 
to accept? BC wanted to play in a New 
Year's Day bowl, and the one which 
was willing to accept the Eagles at that 
moment was the Cotton Bowl (remem- 
ber, the Miracle Pass hadn't been 
thrown yet). So, Bill Flynn and the BC 
football team voted to unofficially 
accept the Cotton Bowl bid after 42 
years of not appearing in a New Year's 
Day Bowl. 

After BC's miraculous victory in Miami, 
a crowd of over 3000 students watched 




5* 



as Father Monan accepted the official 
invitation to play in the Cotton Bowl. The 
ceremony ended with the Cotton Bowl's 
Executive Vice President, Jim "Hoss" 
Brock, saying, "We'll have the greatest 
Bowl game in history. If you don't come 
down and have a good time, it's your 
own dam fault!" JP** 

The day after the bid was official, the 
Boston College Athletic Association 
started selling the 12,500 tickets allotted 
to BC. By 5PM, BC had sold over 10,000" 
tickets. When the rush was over, BC had*' 
sold over 17,000 tickets from Roberts 
Center. 

The football team still had one more 
game to concentrate on before it could 
think about the Cotton Bowl. Once the 
Eagles easily defeated Holy Cross and 
Doug Flutie had received his Heisman. 
the talk was all Cotton Bowl and the 
Houston Cougars. 

The players enjoyed a week off; to 
study for exams, but started condition- 
ing practices on December 10th con- 



122 / Sports 





(continued) from page 122 

tinuing until the 13th. They had from the 
14th to the 1 7th off, with practices begin- 
ning on the 17th. The players were 
allowed to go home on the 22fid for 
Christmas and were all flown tqiballas 
on the 26th. 

The players enjoyed a week of fun 
including a Willie Nelson concert, a 
night at Billy Bobs and ConfettPsV-and a 
day at a ranch. But, January 1, 1985 
came all too fast. The New Year was, 
celebrated in style, except for the team 1 
who had a 11PM curfew. 

The long awaited day had come. Noth- 
ing dampened the BC fans spirits. The 
only hindrance was the weather: low 
30's with gusts of wind from 20 to 30 mph. 

The Dallas Morning News summed up 
the BC spirits Py saying: 

^n the end, nothing bothered therr^ 
Not the cold winds that dropped the : 
wind-chill factor in the Cotton Bowl t(§ 
near zero. Not the suPpar (for him) pern 



formance of quarterback Doug Flutie. 
And not the revival of the Houston 
Cougars in the second half. 

No, Boston College Eagles had 
climbed too far up the mountain of re- 
spectability for that. The tiny school from 
Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, with pre- 
tensions of grandeur was not about to 
squander its first New Year's Day invita- 
tion in 42 years. It was not about to let 
Flutie, the Heisman Trophy winner and 
America's newest coverboy end his col- 
legiate career without the satisfaction of 
a bowl victory. 

The first half of the game appeared as 
though BC would have a cake-walk 
with the Houston Cougars. The defense 
silenced their critics with their superb 
effort in holding back Houston's veer-T 
offense. A major part of the defensive 
story was the antics of freshman line- 
backer Bill RomanoWski, who led the 
Eagles with 13 tackles and was voted 
the Defensive Player of the 1985 Cotton 
Bowl. With the help of Mike Ruth, Scott 
Harrington, Dave Pereira, Peter Holey, 
Dave Thomas, and Chuck Gorecki, 
Houston was held to only 14 points in the 
first half and BC had a 17 point lead. 

Even though Doug Flutie was having 

; what he considered to be a mediocre 

day- 13 of 37 fa 180 passing yards, pass- 



ng for 3 touchdowns, and throwing 2 
interceptions, the offense still produced. 
The major reason the offense was so 
successful was because of the running 
game which features Troy Stradford, 
who rushed for 196 yards, and Steve 
Strachan, who rushed for 93 yards. Steve 
Strachan was voted the Offensive Player 
of the 1985 Cotton Bowl for ability to 
make big plays when the Eagles 
needed them, plus getting those all im- 
portant short yard first downs. 

The second half of the game proved 
to the fans that it really was cold in Dal- 
las. The Cougars started to close the 
gap by scoring 2 touchdowns in the 
third quarter to bring them within 3. The 
Eagles began to dominate in the fourth 
quarter by scoring 2 touchdowns, com- 
pliments of Strachan and Stradford, and 
putting the game out of reach. 

With the decisive defeat over Hous- 
ton, The Class That Nobody Wanted 
soared into football history. The 1984 
Boston College football season was 
capped off by winning the Lambert Tro- 
phy as the best team in the East and by 
finishing as the fifth best college football 
team in the country as voted by AP. 

— Kerstin Gnazzo and Cheryl Cap- 
Peter Klldaras *kj puccio 

Sports / 123 



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Makis latridis 

124 / Sports 



Makis latridis 




Lacrosse 



Lacrosse, a sport that had always been 
associated with Boston College, had posted 
yet another successful season. Both the 
men's and women's teams were forces to be 
reckoned with in their respective divisions. 

The men, a NCAA division one team, had 
several factors in their favor this season. It was 
a team that possessed both the old and the 
new. The old was personified in the three 
seniors, and four year starters, captains Mike 
Hannan (mid-field), Pete Burger (defense), 
and Ed Konstolanski (attack). 



The new came in the form of a new 
coaching staff consisting of Aps Kianan and 
Ed Moy, and several outstanding freshman 
team members including, Bill Ghan and Per- 
ry O'Grady, This interesting mix of a new 
coaching staff and both returning and newly 
discovered talent led the Boston College La- 
crosse team through a rather unigue season. 

For the first time, the team made a trip to 
California over spring break meeting up with 
the likes of U-Cal Berkley among others. The 
team's challenging regular schedule in- 



cluded the University of Massachusetts. 
Brown and the University of New Hampshire 

This years Lacrosse team, though, was 
obviously one that enjoyed meeting chal- 
lenges head on. They were able to do this 
with the help of a few additional key players, 
Paul Stenburg, Jeff Morgan, and Tom Hone 
(team goalie) all of whom were juniors. 

The future looked bright for this up and 
coming Boston College lacrosse sguad. 

— Tony Cammarota 




Sports / 125 




Score 






FOOTBALL 










WOMEN'S BASKETBALL 




BC 


Opponent 








BC Opponent 


44 


Western Carolina 


24 








76 Brown 


56 


38 


Alabama 


31 








66 UMass/Amherst 


58 


52 


North Carolina 


20 








80 New Hampshire 


57 


24 


Temple 


10 








48 .-Detroit 


66 


20 


West Virginia 


21 






55 Cheyney State 


47 


35 
30 


Rutgers 
Penn State 


23 
37 




i 




75 Harvard 

67 Boston Univ. 


49 
68 


45 


Army 


31 








75 Connecticut 


63 


24 


Syracuse 


16 








66 Northeastern 


58 


47 


Miami 


45 








43 Penn State 


85 


45 


Holy Cross 
Cotton Bowl 


10 








54 St. Johr« 
71 Providence 


47 
56 


45 


Houston 


28 




MEN'S BASKETBALL 




59 Syracuse^ 


51 




FINAL RECORD: 10-2 




BC 


Opponent 


50 Villanova * 


57 








86 


New Hampshire 


63 


52 Pittsburgh \ 


53 








82 


Wake Forest 


76 


69 Georgetown * 


50 








90 


Brown 


70 


78 Seton Hall 


50 








98 


Stonehill 


71 


64 Connecticut 


55 








70 


Rhode Island 


50 


77 Holy Cross 


66 








85 


Holy Cross 


63 


57 St. John's 


47 








87 


Randolph-Macon 


43 


69 Providence 


77 








82 


Michigan State 


78 


57 Syracuse 


65 ? 






' (: *&1!«a . 


92 


Texas Christian 


75 


65 Villanova 


56 








67 


Providence 


55 












80 


Georgetown (OT) 


82 


l\\ m 








58 


Syracuse 


64 










M 


69 


Seton Hall 


66 








i 




66 
59 


Villanova 
St. John's 


85 
66 


V ^ 








55 


Pittsburgh 


61 




4* 








78 


Ik Connecticut (OT) 


77 


m \ * 


■ 








94 


Hartford 


77 




t 








82 


Northeastern 


75 












93 


Providence 


66 




f 








67 


Syracuse 


66 






f 


MEN'S SOCCER 




68 


Georgetown 


78 






1 f 


Opponents 
Fairleigh Dickinson 


101 
62 


Seton Hall 
a Villanova 


83 
61 


> ^v 




1 


Southern Methodist 







gfl 








1 

! 


North Texas State 

Connecticut 

New Hampshire (OT) 


2 
3 
1 




"~s&» ,. v 




2^i * 




o 


Maine 
Syracuse 


*1 
3 








MEN'S GOLF 




2 


Harvard 


1 










3 


Merrimack 


1 








Big East Tournament 


5th 


1 


Yale 


2 








New.tngland Tournament 


9th 


3 


Vermont 









k 


Army- West Point Tournament 


15th 





Providence 


3 




^ 


| J 


ECAC Tournament (Qualifying 






Brown (OT) 
Rhode Island (OT) 
Massachusetts (OT) 


1 


4 




h*/ 


| 


Round) 


5th 




Northeastern 
Holy Cross 








*r K 










Boston Univ. 







i 










FINAL RECORD: 7-8-3 








1 






126 / Sports 



















WOMEN'S SWIMMING & DIVING 



BC 

3C Coed Relays 
51 Villanova 


Opponent 
1st 
62 


83 


Maine 


57 


37 


Harvard 


103 


80 

100 


New Hampshire 60 
Northeastern 39 


40 


Boston Univ. 


100 


102 


Massachusetts 


38 


100 


Providence 


39 


69 

81 
89 


Army 

Springfield 

Connecticut 


71 
59 
50 




FINAL RECORD: 


7-4 




^ p 





V. 




MEN'S SWIMMING & DIVING 
BC Opponent 

BC Coed Relays 
25 Villanova 

79 Worcester Polytech 

82 Providence 

53 Rhode Island 

72 Southeastern MH1 

92 Holy Cross 

60 Babson 

72 New Hampshire 

Greater Boston Championships 
53 Northeastern 

57 Central Conn. State 





Board 







MEN'S HOCKEY 
BC 

Northeastern 

5 North Dakota 

4 North Dakota 

4 New Hampshire 

5 Providence 

3 Denver 
7 Denver 

6 Boston Univ. 

5 Lowell 
11 Holy Cross 

2 Minnesota 

2 Minnesota 

4 Michigan Tech 

6 Michigan Tech 
9 Brown 

3 Northern Michigan 

7 Northern Michigan 

6 Harvard 

7 Colorado College 
7 Colorado College 

5 Wisconsin 

6 Wisconsin 
10 Boston Univ. 

4 Minnesota-Duluth 

4 , Minnesota-Duluth 
3 New Hampshire 

5 Providence 
10 Northeastern 

9 Maine 

15 Lowell 

5 New Hampshire 

5 Harvard 



Opponent 
5 
7 
3 
3 

8 
4 
3 
7 
2 
8 
4 
2 
2 
3 
2 
3 
6 
5 
5 
2 
2 
1 




BC 
6 



WOMEN'S TENNIS 



Cambridge-England 
I Yale 

9 Connecticut 

7 Boston Univ. 

8 Northeastern 
6 Brown 

8 Tufts 

5 Dartmouth 

Syracuse Unity Tournament 
ECAC Tournament 
Big East Tournament 
New England Championship 



Opponent 



4 

2 



2 

1 

3 

1 

A 

2nd 

9th 

2nd 

1st 



*% 
S* 




Thanks to Sports Publicity, The Heights', 
and the 1984-85 staff of Sub Turri for 

their help with the sports section for this 
year's book. 

Anthony Cammarota, Sports Editor 
Tim Bever and Mimi Rehak, Assistant 
Editors 



Scores complete through February 
1985 



Sports / 127 








Bob Vanasse 

"If you dream it, you can achieve it." 

— Doug Flutie 

Doug Flutie: 1984 recipient of the Heis- 
man Trophy, a trophy awarded annual- 
ly to the outstanding American college 
football player as a symbol of excell- 
ence. 

December 1, 1984/New York: 

The Heisman room on the thirteenth 
floor of the New York Downtown Athletic 
Club (DAC) was the sight of the pre- 
sentation of the Heisman trophy for 1 984. 
As was sometimes the case, the audi- 
ence anxiously awaited the inevitable, 

128 / Sports 



yet, there was suspense; excitement 
which culminated with DAC President 
Harold A. Reinauer standing before the 
podium, and announcing: "We con- 
gratulate and welcome the golden 
anniversary Heisman trophy winner — 
from Boston College, Doug Flutie." 

Among those present were Boston 
College officials: Jack Bicknell (head 
coach], William J. Flynn (Director of 
Athletics) and J. Donald Monan, SJ (Uni- 
versity President), Cotton Bowl Executive 
Vice President Jim "Hoss" Brock, family 
members, and roommate and receiver 
of THE PASS, Gerard Phelan. They had all 
accompanied Flutie from Worcester, 




/ 



Massachusetts, where he had just play- 
ed his final regular season college foot- 
ball game against Holy Cross that after- 
noon. The final score was 45-10 BC. 

The nonrecruited underdog had 
been the Heisman favorite. He had 
been referred to as perhaps the 
greatest college football player ever, 
and still, upon receiving the award Flu- 
tie expressed, "You dream of winning 
the Heisman, but you can't make it a 
goal. This is something special to the 
whole BC community." 
— Kathy Pelaez and Tony Cammarota 






^ 




tm 



t 






f 



I 





I 







Geoff Why 



Sports / 129 




Alison Brooks 

130 / Student Life 







I 



a&zvtii&s* 




:W 




Student Life / 131 



Spare Time 




Henry Hyder 

Studying always had its ups and 
downs, for the most part it was down. 
Yes, down as in stretched out on the 
livingroom sofa, a cup of coffee in one 
hand and a chewed up yellow outliner 
in the other hand. Somewhere under- 
neath the wads of crumpled up papers 
was your book that was supposed to 
provide you with the wealth of Wisdom 
that impelled you to sign up for the 
course. 

Ah, the sweet discipline of college life 
and the woe of studying and grinding 
out the papers just didn't seem to equal 
the same exhiliration of lying back in the 
recliner and dozing on a mellow Sun- 
day afternoon. Eventually the cruel god 
called Motivation forced you to trek up 
to that seat in the library that had your 
name written all over it. 

Studying and sleeping always 
seemed to battle until the crafty Siren of 
relaxation successfully lured one into its 
enduring state. After all relaxing was im- 
portant as a means of "airing out the 
weary mind" and preparing the student 
for their next homework assignment. 




132 / Student Life 



Mary Leonard 




Student Life / 133 



Tailgating 



vt: parties, kegs, and cook-outs originating 
from the trunks of cars or other vehicles 
beginning hours prior to football games, 
lasting throughout the game and even 
afterwards. 

Tailgating was a phenomenon at BC. In 
fact, generations of BCers returned to their 
alma mater annually to don every article 
of Boston College paraphernalia ever 
manufactured, and then some! 

The menu included everything from 
hamburgers grilled on makeshift barrel- 
halves to gourmet hors d'oevres dished up 
on servers bearing the official school seal 
with maroon and gold Boston College 
cocktail napkins on the side. 

The student "plex" parking lot was the 
prime location for the pre-game party. Ex- 
tremely enthusiastic 'gaters were even 
spotted on the plex's roof from time to time. 
Travelling to Sullivan Stadium in Foxboro for 
some home games did not hinder the BC 
tailgater. But the bowl games boasted the 
most avid, faithful BC fans. They proved 
that no matter how far away from home the 
game is the tailgate must go on! 

— Mary Leonard 




/ 



Andy Ryan 








Andy Ryan 

134 / Student Life 



Tom Smith 



Partying 



. . . That seemed to be the theme for 
Boston College weekends. What was a 
typical Boston College Party anyway? The 
word seemed to have a different meaning 
for each BC student. For most, it was a 
means of escaping the heavy grind of 
classes and homework. A typical Thursday 
afternoon involved the imperative search 
for weekend parties. 

After a tough day of "relaxing" on Satur- 
day, it was time to venture out into the party 
world. Due to extensive party selections, 
the party route was always important. Hill- 
side parties had the apartment living 
rooms which provided ample room for 
dancing while simultaneously managing 
to hold onto a beer . . . 

The Mod parties had the reckless, open 
air format. With the keg in the kitchen and 
the back door open party-goers had the 
freedom to wander in and out depending 
on the standing-room conditions. Measure 
for measure the parties at BC were equal in 
the sense that no matter where they were, it 
was the people there that made it a 
memorable time. 

— Lauren Wilkins 



tudent Life / 135 



Dustbowl 

"It's a great day to bowl it," 
announced Bob, a tall blond senior as 
he stuffed his bookbag under his head 
and reclined on a large segment of 
grass. It sure was! On any day when the 
sun shined brilliantly over BC, the stretch 
of grass between the quad and McEI- 
roy, known as the dustbowl, was the 
place to be. 

Bob, who appeared to be a profes- 
sional bowler, was displaying just one of 
the qualifications of dustbowling. to 
"hang" one must be completely at ease 
with all that is happening around him. 
The attitude one developed was not 
one of apathy, but rather that of lan- 
guishing the opportunity to bask in the 
sun. 

To aid in the sheer pleasure of taking it 
all in a few accessories must accompa- 
ny one. First, sunglasses, preferably 
Raybans or Vuarnets must be worn. 
Next, frisbees, or any other recreational 
outdoor gadgets were added to the re- 
laxed playful atmosphere of the dust- 
bowl. Lastly, books had to be in sight, 
projection the student image of the eter- 
nal "dustbowler" as he unwittinglly mis- 
sed his last class to relish the glorious day 
that would quietly evade him. 




Makis latridis 




Deirdre Reidy 



136 / Student Life 




ueirdre Reidy 



Student Life / 137 




Mary Leonard 



D in Tne moas was an unuenevuutts swi »ui ca^o ici i<».c;. men >wvjS housed 
only seniors. This created an exclusive senior attitude that distinguished mod 
life from traditional dorm life. 

Generally, people living in the mods went to classes Monday through 
Thursday. Rarely would mod-dwellers venture up to campus on Friday. / 
Unless they were going to the "Attitude Adjustment Hour" at the Rat. S 
The three day weekends lent themselves to many opportunities. / 
Road-trips, Peach-trips or even laying out in the Packyard ■/ 
were all options. X ^ 

There was always something happening in the mods. 
One Monday morning at 7:00 there as a "Beginning of 
the Week Party" on the douple deck. Breakfast con- 
sisted of Pagels, Paeon and Peer. The place was 
eked. 

Sut following such a Pash came the awful 
realization that there was no dishwasher! 
Oh well, living in the mods wasn't per- 
fect paradise. The paper-thin walls ^W 
made neighPors well ac- / 
quainted whether they liked it / 
or not. But the shaving S 
cream fights with them 
made it worth it. Mod- 
life would never die. 

— DR W 





138 / Student Life 




Student Lite / 139 



Munch Time 




Tom Brine 

140 / Student Life 



Mary Leonard 




From the freshman barbecue through 
the senior banquet, food played an in- 
tegral part in the BC experience. Fresh- 
men were initiated into the eating scene 
through points . . . tickets to unlimited 
indulgences and social hours at all of 
BC's dining hotspots. Whether you chose 
to devour fried clams at Lyons, savor 
Chicken Monan at the Golden Lantern 
Restaurant, pick at tuna salad and a 
muffin at the Eagles Nest or gorge at the 
buffet at McElroy, each establishment 
offered variety in selection as well as an 
assortment of people with whom to 
socialize. 

For those who were more ambitious, 
nearby Boston could satisfy the pickiest 
of palates. Quincy Market was the most 
popular eating spot, while other favo- 
rites included NO Names fish restaurant 
(don't forget to provide your own bever- 
ages), Pizzeria Uno, Houlihan's, and 
Aku-Aku. 

The most heavenly binge, however, 
was available just a stones throw away 
from Gasson tower. And as the tradition- 
al legend says ... the Eagle will fly the 
day a BC girl graduates who has never 
tried White Mountain Ice cream. 

— Elizabeth Seigenthaler 




Henry Hyder 



Student Life / 141 



Street Chic at BC 




Deirdre Reidy 






Deirdre Reidy 

142 / Student Life 



Deirdre Reidy 




Peter Klidaras 






' 



*tf 



Deirdre Reidy 







Deirdre Reidy 



vv 






l/SS 



I iojcony', 



u. 



Deirdre Reidy 



Seen on the Scene . 



Student Life / 143 



Off Campus: 
The Lighter Side 



On the great scale of human expe- 
rience, off campus life was a memory 
to be reckoned with. Apartment hunt- 
ing usually came down to the deci- 
sion between the distance from Bos- 
ton College and the amount of cock- 
roaches that were scurrying about 
the kitchen floor. There were always 
the condos which were notorious for 
their rent which was well beyond the 
financial grasp of the typical college 



student. Yes, those Cleveland Circle 
landlords were sitting on a goldmine. 

However, the BC student was not to be 
daunted. Off campus parties provided 
an "RA-Free" atmosphere which only 
added to the festive spirit. Maturity was 
the key factor when it came time to deal 
with "real world" problems such as 
paying rent, electricity and buying gro- 
ceries. And of all horrors, knowing that 
one had to commute to school pro- 



vided the needed impetus to set the alarm 
on extra fifteen minutes early. 

About six months into the school year 
when it came time to think of leaving, one 
began to realize that the mixed assortment 
of furniture, the cracks in the closet door, 
and the makeshift curtains in the kitchen 
had actually made their way into your 
heart. It may not have been the ritziest 
dwelling but nevertheless, it was home. 
And that's a memorable experience! 







144 / Student Life 



Grocery Shopping? 




It all happened to us either junior or 
senior year when we were no longer de- 
pendent upon the Point Plan. At first this 
experience could be a little frightening 
by the thought of six roommates having 
to buy and plan meals for a whole 
week. The right grocery store was impor- 
tant and we chose to do all of our gro- 
cery shopping at Heartland. 

When entering Heartland you first en- 
countered the fruit and vegetable sec- 
tion, The store has almost every type of 
fresh produce imaginable. If unsure of 
what the weird mushy orange thing that 
you were buying was, why not take a 
bite — just to make sure you liked it. The 
next section was our favorite — the food 
bins. In these bins you could find all sorts 
of foods, everything from yogurt cov- 
ered raisins to dried apricots. 

If you were a cheese lover you would 
be happy to know that in the cheese 
aisle there was an assortment of cheese 
samples, Next stop was the fish and 
meat section. There every roommate 
could be satisfied including the vegetar- 
ian, carnivore and kilbasi lover in the 
crowd. The following section was the 
dairy produce aisle. You would be 
amazed at the large variety of yogurt 
flavors the store carried. 

The lines in Heartland were not that long 
and moved fast. All in all grocery shop- 
ping wasn't bad and could become a 
good excuse to get away from studying. 
— Deirdre Reidy 




Karen Michaels 



Student Life / 145 



, SB 






2*1 



146 / Student Life 






»'"*»V«sSI 




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^rai^w 


Hpll| 








•■*"■-■• 
BSttragf! 




Regatta 

As a recreational and studying site in 
the spring and early fall, the Charles Riv- 
er couldn't be beat. But one event in 
particular endeared the Charles Riverto 
Boston students — the-Head-of-the- 
Charles-Regatta, which celebrated its 
twentieth anniversary Sunday October 
21, 1984. 

One of the preppiest and most color- 
ful sporting events to be attended in all 
of New England, the Head-of-the- 
Charles Regatta was the largest rowing 
event in the world. Each October over 
720 boats from all across the United 
States, Canada, Scotland, and Eng- 
land competed in the 18 separate 
events which lasted throughout the day. 
Over 3,000 rowers covered the three 
miles beginning at the Boston University 
Boat Club near the BU Bridge to the finish 



Mary Leonard 



line (about a half mile beyond the Eliot 
Bridge near the WBZ Studios), creating a 
vertible pageant of rowing. 

In 1984, the Regatta, America's Fall 
Rowing Festival, began at 9:30 am with 
the Men's Veteran's Singles, made up of 
scullers of at least 50 years of age. 
Youths, women, and clubs also vied to 
be crowned "Head" of the Charles River 
for the ensuing year in their respective 
classes. The premier event, the Men's 
Championship Eights concluded the 
affair with the U.S. Naval Academy de- 
fending its three-year title. 

Boston College sports enthusiasts also 
took a part in the sideline festivities for a 
different sort of tailgating, with even an 
occasional Rolls Royce to be found. 

— Mary Leonard 




photos left and above by Alison Brooks 



Student Life / 147 



As we began our final semester at 
Boston College, it suddenly occurred to 
us that our carefree, relatively worry free 
student days were reaching a conclu- 
sion. Soon the confrontation with the 
"real" world would be an inevitable 
occurance and each of us 
approached the idea of our future with 
nervous anxiety. Nerves were evident in 
the sense that these four years of stu- 
dious finally began to take shape. 

How could we avoid the momentous 
sweep of Time as it pushed us closer and 
closer to that fated day of graduation? 
With the Career Center's monthly dead- 
lines and unlimited numbers of work- 
shops, we soon joined the flow of the job 
searchers. Competitively, we tried to 
maneuver ourselves into the most profit- 
able position for attaining our future 
goals. The only problem was that with 
one foot still firmly lodged in the party- 
study style of academic life and the 
other foot slowly stepping towards the 
life of independent, responsible adult- 
hood, those future goals seemed a little 
nebulous. 

Resumes, interviews, suits, black 
pumps and Business Weekly wormed 
their way into our daytime thoughts as 



Career Center: 




Peter Hillenbrand 




Makis latridis 

148 / Student Life 



The Hunt Begins 




well as our evening nightmares. How 
many times over Christmas vacation 
and during the second semester's many 
party gatherings were we asked, "What 
are you going to do after graduation?" 
How many times did we fumble for a 
response to this everlasting guestion. 
How many times did we stand in front of 
the bathroom mirror and, with a nervous 
shudder, ask ourselves, "What am I 
going to do after graduation?!" The only 
answer was no answer because unless 
we were one of those fortunate few who 
had our lives conveniently plotted out 
already, no one knew exactly what the 
future held. 

Whether we chose joPs in the business 
world or opted for a life of living each 
day to "see what happens in the job 
market" or decided to continue our ed- 
ucation in pursuance of a medical, le- 
gal or other type of masters degree, we 
eventually made the decisions for out 
futures. Yet, even though we made 
them, somehow the future still escaped 
us. We soon realized that even though 
we grew older and stepped into the 
adult world with both feet, Future was 
always one step ahead. 

— Tania Zielinski 



Deirdre Reidy 




Student Life / 149 



I found my roommate one day, lying 
on the living room couch, his head 
propped atop two pillows. One arm 
was draped across his forehead and 
the other tightly clenched a bottle of 
Budweiser. His sweatpants were ripped 
on both 'knees and his shirt, drenched 
with sweat, was matted to his skin. 

I asked him, softly, if there was any- 
thing I could get him. Aspirin, water, the 
phone, his favorite baseball mitt, any- 
thing. For some particular reason I felt 
some mysterious compassion for his 
apparantly abused muscles. 

Ah, the discipline of the plex fanatic. 
In a moment of sincere benevolence I 
stepped over to the chair next to him, 
took the basketball off and sat down. I 
proceeded to begin my speech about 
the traumas of a rigid exercise routine. 
Who needs the plex with its basketball 
courts, tennis courts, swimming pools 
and worst of all tortures, the indoor 
track? Who needs intramural activities 
to interact with people? Why not settle 
for walking to and from classes? Or go 
to the library? 

Just then his tennis partner phoned. 

"Tennis, tonight? 6 o'clock? Sure, I'll 
write it down for him." 

I hung up the phone and looked over. 
He had turned to grin at me with a mis- 
chievous smirk. 
Masochist. 

— TAZielinski 




Mary Leonard 




Andy Ryan 

150 / Student Life 



The Plex: Sweating it out 




Student Life / 151 



7:30 am: You awaken to the smells of 
bacon and eggs and freshly brewed 
coffee. After a morning stretch and an 
envigorating shower you slip into the 
neatly pressed outfit laid out the previ- 
ous evening. Where are you? . . . HOME. 

The BC senior knows that things rarely go 
so smoothly and is accustomed to a day 
of confusion and chaos. 

10:30 am: You fumble for the aspirin on 
the night table, spilling the glass of wa- 
ter in The process. You cock open one 
eye and peek from the safety of your 
covers to inspect the actions of your 
roommate who is beginning a reading 
assignment for an 11:00 class. You curse 
about all the things you have to do and 
roll over and fall asleep. 
11:30 am: Summing up all energy re- 
serves you drag yourself out of bed and 
stand in front of the full length mirror. 
Disgusted, you make way for the kitch- 
en, delighting in the discovery of rem- 
nants of last nights pizza. 
12:30 pm: After finishing a breakfast of 
two cups of coffee and pizza, you set off 
in the direction of the shower. No hot 
water, no sense in wasting time there. 
What to wear — you weed your favorite 
jeans out of the laundry basket and the 
sweater with gravy stains — no one will 
notice. 

12:50 pm: Late for class, your run to up- 
per campus breaking all track records 
and stop to talk to friends only three 
times. Today's lesson in Learning to 
Learn is "How to schedule Time." You 
forgot your pen. 

1 :50 pm: Hangover in full gear, your next 
stop is Eagles Nest where the mission is to 
beg lunch from an underclassman. Su- 
per way to make friends. Others join you 
in criticizing innocent passers-by an art 
called "scoping." You are greeted with 
ego-boosting comments like, "You 
were a mess last night" and many un- 
familiar faces call you by your name. 
Too bad you can't remember last night. 
4:00 pm: Still not having found a pen, 
you skip your Future of Consciousness 
class figuring that you could teach your- 
self to fly. You head for the Career Meet- 
ing only to leave fifteen minutes later, 
thoroughly depressed. You have de- 
cided to go to Europe after graduation. 
5:30 pm: Prime time at the Plex. You 
drop in to watch the girls engaging in 
aerobics, all dressed Tike Jane Fonda 
and the guys playing basketball all 
dressed like guys in sweats. Deciding 
that you have burned enough calories 
watching, you head for the sauna. 
8:00 pm: Suppertime. Being a master 
chef you whip up an appetizing mus- 
tard sandwich on a hot dog roll served 
with a bowl of Captain Crunch. Who 
said you couldn't cook. You prop your 
schoolbook against a beer bottle, 
glancing at it occasionally and flip a 
few pages for effect. 
9:30 pm: Homework set aside you sit 
around complaining about how bored 
you are and resort to calling everyone 
you know in search of a playmate. You 
and buddies seek entertainment at 
M.A.'s . . . ah, those were the days. 

— Nina M. Derba 

152 / Student Life 




Geoff Why 

fcilUHU 




The Life of 
A Senior 




Student Life / 153 



Cotton Bowl 



At the end of December 1984, the 
largest exodus between cities from Bos- 
ton to Dallas took place. 25,000 BC 
eagle fans flocked to the Cotton Bowl to 
cheer on Doug Flutie and ring in the new 
year in Dallas. Although BC alumni and 
students did not find warm weather in 
Dallas they were greeted with warm 
southern hospitality. Each night BC 
chose a different nightclub to visit such 
as Confetties, Monopolies or Croco- 
diles. Days were spent shopping and 
ice skating in the Galleria or discovering 
new foods prepared in the southern 
kitchen. Many students stayed in the 
Quality Inn which became Dallas' ver- 
sion of Walsh Hall. 

The magic began at the Pep Rally 
held in the Anatole New Year's Eve, BC 
fans gathered along with the BC band 
to cheer on the football team. At the 
Cotton Bowl, the Eagles proved their su- 
periority and beat the Cougars — 45 to 
28. The trip was a very successful one 
and will be remembered for years to 
come. 

— Deirdre Reidy 




Peter Klidaras 

154 / Student Life 



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158 / Student Life 




Money to Burn? 




Makis latridis 

Remember the times when you were 
in need of a little extra cash? Those times 
when a certain feeling of desperation 
set in because you didn't have enough 
money to participate in the exciting so- 
cial events happening on and around 
the Boston College campus. 

One alternative was to call home, but 
the money wouldn't always arrive in 
time. We could borrow, but most of our 
friends just didn't have it to lend. The only 
other plausible alternative to guarantee 
a steady cash flow was to work. Luckily, 
the BC campus offered us a numPer of 



opportunities to obtain that extra 
needed cash. The Plex, Bookstore, 
O'Neill Library, various offices and din- 
ing halls were all popular places to work 
and did not require outrageous time 
commitments. 

Off campus establishments were 
generally very happy to hire a hard 
working BC student. While Mountain 
Creamery, L'il Peach, The College Sup 
Shop and Star Market were usually in 
need of help, especially when school 
was in session. 

— Cheryl Cappuccio 

Sports / 159 







Justine Cunningham 

160 / Student Life 



Getting Down 










Some people said I had no survival 
instincts; some said I lacked common 
sense; most told me to take lessons. I 
loved to ski, so what was the proPlem? I 
didn't know how to ski, that was the 
problem! 

How anyone could strap two six-foot 
long slabs of waxed wood on his feet 
and race flawlessly down a seventy de- 
gree slope of sheer ice was beyond my 
knowledge of physics. 

An appropriate title of this story would 
be "A beginner's Guide to Spectacular 
Wipe-outs and Related Skiing Mis- 
adventures." As a human being and a 
victim of countless accidents myself, I 
felt that I was capable of such delinea- 
tion of the sport I adored so much. The 
first piece of advice I had to give was to 
look like you belong as you walked 
through the jam-packed lodge enroute 
to the lift ticket booth. Don't be abashed 
if people were laughing at your skis that 
looked like Rossignol's answer to the 
Model-T Ford and your boots that had 
laces instead of buckles. As long as you 
donned a $500 down parka and a mul- 
it-colored, pom-pommed snow hat you 
should fit in with the rest of the "ski- 
crowd," 

The ability of a skier was directly prop- 
ortional to the number of lift tickets 
attached to the zipper of his jacket. 
Never ski with someone who had more 
than three different lift tickets and espe- 
cially stay away from anyone with tick- 
ets printed in foreign languages. As a 
general rule, always select a fellow be- 
ginner for a partner. It was relatively 
easy to discern an expert from a novice. 
The expert glided down the mountain 
with a smile on his face while the novice 
screamed down the slope, careening 
from tree to tree. 

Now that you found a partner, the next 
step was to get on the chairlift — no 
sweat, right? Wrong. You had exactly 
three seconds to trek from your place in 
line to a squat position twenty feet 
away, in front of the oncoming chair, 
with skis parallel. If you should happen 
to stumble on the way to the chair, it 
would be in your better judgement to 
duck because the chairs did not stop for 
anyone, 

It was a smooth ride to the peak of the 
mountain, so a conversation was 
needed with your chairlift companion. 
Hopefully you would be pleasured with 
the company of someone of the oppo- 
site sex because many interesting rela- 
tionships developed from chairlift en- 
counters. Don't send out the wedding 
invitations too early, however, because 
according to beginner tradition, the first 
time someone was on a chairlift, he al- 
ways lost one of his skis three-fourths of 



the way to the top. All of your big-shot 
ski-talk (you probably had her believing 
that you were a member of the US Olym- 
pic Ski Team or that you owned the en- 
tire ski resort) slid down the mountain 
with the abandoned ski. 

Once at the top of the mountain, one 
should take time to digest the panor- 
amaic view provided by such a high 
vantage point. This comfortabte feeling 
could easily be transformed into ner- 
vous fright, however, by merely reading 
the name of the slope off a posted sign. 
"Satan's Revenge". So here you were, 
uni-skied on an expert trail, looking 
straight downward at the bug that two- 
thousand feet ago was your car, and 
shaking out of fear for your life. "You 
guys go ahead first, I'm right behind 
you," was your first remark. Chances 
were they would not bother to look back 
and witness your futile attempt at main- 
taining balance anyway! 

All that you had to do to begin your 
battle with the devil was lift your ski poles 
from the snow. There was no need to 
push off because the mountain was like 
a magnet drawing you into your darkest 
nightmare (unless, of course, the 
thought of impending death delighted 
you!) At first, the trail was simple with a 
few hills and slight turns that were surpri- 
singly navigable. You hadn't con- 
quered the mountain yet, though, be- 
cause just ahead was a ninety degree 
cliff and the skiers in front of you were not 
slowing down, much less stopping. 
Watching the others drop off the edge 
of the earth would probably cause you 
to give up early and close your eyes, 
missing your spectacular wipe-put. 

Your eyes were the only functional 
part of your body so with them they fol- 
lowed the blue streak from the seat of 
your jeans to the point of impact with the 
snow about four-hundred feet above. 
Listening for Rod Serling's voice would 
not help because you were not dead, 
just in severe pain. After you unsuccess- 
fully tried to convince the ski-patrolman 
that you were a professional stuntman 
filming a movie and that you would ski 
down the rest of the trail, he would roll 
you onto a sled and bounce you down 
the mountainside to the first aid shack. 

Thank the doctor for putting stitches in 
your forehead and a cast on your leg 
because now you had a legitimate ex- 
cuse for staying away from the monster 
that some call a ski-slope. It was cold 
outside but it was warm in the lodge with 
a large mug of hot chocolate mixed 
with a tad of peppermint schnappes. 
Besides, all the really pretty ski-bunnies 
gathered inside by the hearthstone fire- 
piece anyway! 

— Dan Wheeler 

Student Life / 161 



Dorm 








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Living quarters at Boston College 
differed from one extreme to another. 
On the one side, there were the old- 
fashioned dormitory rooms, and on 
the other there were the spacious 
apartments. 

Life as a freshman at BC began 
with a student residing either on Up- 
per Campus or more frequently New- 
ton Campus. These newcomers were 
put in the traditional dorm rooms, with 
two beds, two desks and two dres- 
sers, bang, that was it. Showers were 
a community experience and hot 
water became a luxury by 10 o'clock 
in the morning. But, some rooms were 
different. From a 'spacious' two-room 
quad on Newton to a two-room triple 
with a bathroom on Upper, there was 
a little diversity in the dorms. Wait a 
minute, said the people from Fitzpat- 
rick, a two-room triple, with a bath- 
room? Those complaints were stated 
because some rooms on Upper 
Campus housed 3 students, in the 
space of a double room. Well, no 
one said freshmen should live in 
luxury. 

For sophomores, some lived in a 
little nicer place, as Walsh Hall was 
available for those with high lottery 
numbers. Walsh resembled the 
apartment style with one drawback, 
people at Walsh had a mandatory 
meal plan. Walsh housed either four 
people or an eight person suite. Each 
had a private bath and shower and 
the eight person suite even had a big 
living room for people to spend time 
in. 

For those sophomores with a not so 
fortunate lottery number, it was back 
to Upper Campus to go through 
another year of vintage dorm life. 

Juniors basically had the choice 
between Walsh, Hillsides and 
Edmonds, Now with the advent of two 
new spots, living in Walsh as a junior 
was sort of a drawback. 

It was the big time now as both 
Hillsides and Edmonds were real 
apartments with a kitchen and every- 
thing. Also parties with liquor were 
legal in these two places. Hillsides 
mainly housed 6 person suites, while 
Edmonds consisted mostly of 4. It was 
all a matter of taste or for some, lazi- 
ness. In that case Hillsides would be 
more desirable because they were 
closer to main campus. 

Finally, for seniors, the Mods were it. 
They were disappointed if they did 
not get to live in the Mods. The Mods 
were like having your own house with 
5 other people. The main motto 
throughout that section of lower cam- 
pus was "Party" and those seniors 
lived by their motto, 

— Keith Gnazzo 



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Fad-tastic Trends 





Mary Leonard 

7* 



Peter Klidaras 




FRANKIE SAY 

RELAX 



DON'T DO IT! 



Deirdre Reidy 

164 / Student Life 



Alison Brooks 




Alison Brooks 




As the years came to pass, they be- 
came characterized by the things that 
made them unique. 1985 was no excep- 
tion. Whether they were fashion fads, 
celebrity fads or social ones, they ex- 
isted, some briefly and others with more 
impact. But, nonetheless, they gave the 
year a special style . . . 

— Asymetrical hairstyles fashioned after 
the Cindy Lauper look were common in 
'85 ... as the fad died out, girls found 
the haircut to be quite limited . . . 

— who would have thought that a little 
triangle with "Guess" written in it could 
raise the price of denim to well over 
$50 . . . 

— on the music scene, the release of "Born 
in the USA" brought back the sound of 
Bruce's blue collar rock. It was good to 
see Bruce Springsteen survive amidst all 
the new wave music. 

— "The Wave" — the latest spectator 
sport . . . some great plays were missed 
because of the concentration on it 
when your section was supposed to 
stand . . . 

. . . and that was the way it was in 1985. 

— Robert Blaz 





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166 / Student Life 




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Boston College was introduced to a 
new craze during the summer of 1984: 
"A MAC ATTACK". No, a Mac was not a 
McDonald's Big Mac; it was an Apple 
Macintosh computer. Boston College 
purchased 120 new computers which 
were placed in Gasson and the O'Neill 
LiPrary for use by students and faculty. 
This craze also included a deal for BC 
full time students. As long as a student 
was still enrolled at BC, he was allowed 
to purchase his own. Mac for $1260, as 
compared to a retail selling price of 
approximately $2500. 

Many students took advantage of the 
offer because it was a great deal , others 
did because of the convenience. For 
commuting students, it meant not hav- 
ing to spend additional hours on cam- 
pus just to get computer time. The proP- 
lems students ran into was getting com- 
puter time. With the Macintosh being so 
light, 22 pounds, the computer room 
needed user assistants whenever it was 
open. This meant that students could 
only work on the computers until 12 AM 
Monday thru Friday and knew that Sat- 
urday was a wasted day, since the 
computer room was closed. Students 
could no longer pull all nighters in Gas- 
son basement. They could at least get 8 
hours of sleep (the computer room 
didn't open until 9 AM). But still, the 
Macintosh had taken BC by storm. 

— Kerstin Gnazzo 




Geoff Why 



Student Life / 167 



Where are the books? 




Makis latridis 

168 / Student Life 




What did you go to the bookstore for 
today? To kill an hour before class read- 
ing GQ or Glamour, to rummage 
through the maze of BC paraphernalia, 
to buy a sweatshirt for your little brother, 
or to purchase a new BC football video 
tape, or a copy of the latest and never- 
ending supply of Sports Illustrated 
magazines featuring Doug Flutie? 

Books were certainly not the goal of 
your visit today. That only happened 
once a semester (if your roommate 
didn't already have the book, that was). 
The clothing section of the "book "-store 
had been enlarged significantly with 
the selection changing upon every visit. 

With the success of the BC Football 
team and Heisman Trophy winner Doug 
Flutie, the sales at the BC bookstore had 
been booming. And BC students we- 
ren't the only customers. Probably half 
the state composed this diverse clien- 
tele who were more than likely in search 
of the perfect "22" football jersey or 
bumper sticker. 

There were many interesting momen- 
tos and merchandise items at the BC 
Bookstore. There didn't seem like there 
would be much trouble continuing their 
sales success, the only changes being 
the number on the jerseys or the name of 
the next bowl we would be off to. 

— Mary Leonard 



Peter Klidaras 




Student Life / 169 



Parties with a Theme 



The social scene at Boston College 
used to be an all out beer-bash with 100 
of your closest friends. In the 1980's, the 
social scene had gone ,v theme". Theme 
parties were fun, interesting and im- 
aginative. 

The most popular theme parties were 
reviewed here. 

SYR — Screw your Roommate. A 
semi-formal blind-date dance in which 
one was set-up by his or her roommate 
with another's for the evening. 

Limo-Races — Two or more limo's 
were rented to take occupants to as 
many bars as time would allow. There 
were only two rules. 1) You must obtain 
and drink one beverage from each 
establishment. 2] You must have a good 
time. 

Senior Week — The largest theme 
party at Boston College. It involved one 
week of events and parties specially 
aimed at the graduating senior. Events 
ranged from a cruise to nowhere to 
Commencement Ball. The week ended 
with the After Graduation Farewell Party. 
— Lacy Mullowney 




Mary Leonard 




Debbie Elsasser 

170 / Student Life 




Student Life / 171 




Deirdre Reidy 

172 / Student Life 



Deirdre Reidy 




Mary Leonard 



Deirdre Reidy 



Student Life / 173 



After I have graduated from Boston 
College, I will occasionally sit, and re- 
minisce about the people I have met, 
the things I have done, and the educa- 
tion I have received there. These will be 
fond reflections and I deeply thank BC 
for those forwarded thoughts. 

These days I often reminisce about a 
very special friend. Here, it is not neces- 
sary to state his many fine triumphs and 
accomplishments, for those that knew 
him know of these. I do feel that his spe- 
cial quality of being able to make 
others smile or laugh with just a simple 
look, gesture, or statement, should be 
most remembered. For only extremely 
special individuals possess this charac- 
teristic. I would like to thank Douglas W. 
Chapman for having had this wonderful 
characteristic, and also give my 
deepest thanks for having had the 
chance to have met and to have been 
a close friend of such a fine individual. 

Thanks Doug, 

Don Craven, 

Your Family and Friends 



Doug Chapman 




Photo courtesy of the family of Doug Chapman 



174 / Student Life 



Charles Matthieu 




In loving memory of Chuck 
Charles Arthur Matthieu 

Don't be sad, I go to God where I will 
wait for you in heaven; there where we 
shall all be reunited and God . . . "will 
wipe away all tears; there will be no 
more mourning or sadness." I shall love 
you from heaven as I loved you on earth 
... I wait for you! 

"Every time you allow yourself to show 
love to another, the balance of power in 
this world is moved just a little ..." 



Photo courtesy of the family of Chuck Matthieu 



Please note: The families of all deceased members of the Class of 1984 were con- 
tacted. Memoriums were included only for those families that so wished. 



Student Life/ 175 



Weekends 




Mary Leonard 



Alison Brooks 








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176 / Student Life 



Mary Leonard 




Geoff Why 



Anticipation was the only adjective 
that fully described that Mondays, Tues- 
days and Wednesdays ot each week at 
Boston College. As I forced myself to my 
3:00 class Thursday afternoon, images 
of a frosty cold beer were already drift- 
ing through my mind. It had been a long 
week; reading, a test and two papers, 
but hopefully Thursday night would 
make all my hard work worthwhile. After 
hitting the sub shop for my daily intake, I 
went to the plex futily trying to work off 
the inevitabel "beer-gut". Now feeling 
that I had just done something healthy 
and beneficial for my body, that justi- 
fied all the BAD coming to it. Feeling like 
a lean, mean, dancing machine, I jog- 
ged to my mod with high hopes for the 
future. 

I hopped through the sliding door of 
my mod . . . PSYCHE, someone had my 
idea ... a case of cold brews were 
sitting on my dining room table. In one 
swift motion I snatched one from the 
pack and plopped down in front of the 
tube to catch up on World News. (I won- 
dered how the Celts were doing 
anyway.) 

"Get up, you lazy bum," my hyper 
roommate screamed throughout our 
sound-proof mod. I reluctantly dragged 
myself to the shower to get my room- 
mate off my case. The refreshing water 
suddenly brought me back to reality . . . 
This was Rat night! 

Lines usually discouraged most peo- 
ple at BC, not me! I was a senior ... I 
had connections. I strolled in with rela- 
tive ease to check out the situation. 
Some friends, some scopes; it was going 
to be a good night. 

At the end of the evening, mod num- 
bers never stuck in your mind, but the 
throbbing pound in your head the next 
morning reminded you that you had a 
good time, Was this Saturday? I hoped it 
was, but my alarm clock interrupted this 
hopeful thinking reminding me that I 
had my 10:00 gut. 

While on campus for my only class I 
was filled in on the vague gaps that 
clouded my memory of the previous 
night. I tumbled into bed for a few more 
hours of beauty rest before getting 
decked out for Friday happy-hours. 
Being the responsible senior that I was, I 
made this an early night, forcing myself 
to go home after the last bar closed, to 
prepare myself for the early afternoon 
tailgate. 

Saturday nights we were itching to go 
into the city, but a low budget student- 
income kept us at the usual ritual of 
mod-hopping. 

I understood what the good Lord was 
doing when he made a day of rest; Sun- 
days fit his purpose extremely well. 

— Mary Roddy 

Student Life / 177 



eniors 



Deborah Elsasser Age 22 
Major: Organizational Studies- 
Marketing 

Right now I'm worried about get- 
ting accepted to Law school; and 
as May approaches I'll be worried 
about not seeing my roommates 
after graduation. 






Deidre Reidy 

178 / Student Life 



., .hur Tzianabos age 21 
Mar 

As a senior, Pi I iijjnit omncxm 
is never having the chapGp#»J-r 
future to make the kinds of frienc 
('made at BC. 



*# 



Deirdre Reidy 

Student Life / 179 



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Caroline Ostrowski Age: 20 
Major: Human Development 

As a sophomore, I am con 
cerned about choosing the right 
major, Massachusetts changing 
the drinking age, and BC tearing 
down the Mods before I have a 
chance to live there, 



Deirdre Reidy 

180 / Student Life 




Student Life / 181 



Campus Pub 




182 / Student Life 



Series 




John Boswell 



The 1984-1985 Student Government 
was proud to implement its first-ever 
Campus PuP Series during the school 
year. The students, under the Packing of 
UGBC, had Peen fighting for some type 
of responsiPle drinking estaPlishment on 
campus. It took a long summer of fight- 
ing but the administration finally 
approved the plans for great, yet safe 
and mature drinking. 

Beginning each weekly series was 
"The Sunday Night Cafe" held Sunday 
evenings at the Golden Lantern. Bottled 
Peer and hors d'oeuvres were served 
from 9-12. An occasional visit Py a BC 
musician provided the entertainment. 

Monday's pub was held at the Rat in 
Lyons Hall. Minday Night Football 
Games were shown on wide-screen TV. 
Unfortunately, pro football was not as 
exciting as BC's and the series had to be 
cancelled. 

"A Charitable Toast to Tuesday" was 
the theme for Tuesday's Dinner-Lecture 
Series. Held in McElroy's main dining 
room this series lecturers included Lisa 
Birnbach and Dr. Ruth Westmeiner. 

"Pizza and Pitchers" were available 
every Wednesday night at the Golden 
Lantern from 9-12. BC musicians made 
occasional appearance here to help 
cure those mid-week Plues. 

The most popular of the Pub Series 
nights were "The Traditional Rat Nights" 
held each Thursday evening. Hosted 
and run by the Rat staff, Rat night was a 
guaranteed good time for all those who 
attended, "Good Stuff" was the DJ 
deemed most popular Py the students. 
In addition to them the Rat also hosted 
its ever-popular Air Band Contest (a 
smashing success], a Mr. and Mrs. 
Michelob Contest, and Frito Lay Night. 

Attending the Rat's "Attitude Adjust- 
ment Hour" every Friday afternoon was 
a great way to start the weekend. Enter- 
tainment was provided Py jazz musi- 
cians and comedians. 

With the advent of the increased 
drinking age the student's are proving 
the fact that they can drink maturely 
and responsiPly. Keeping the drinking 
on campus, keeping the students off the 
roads, and promoting responsiPle drink- 
ing was the goal of the Campus Pub 
Series. The organizers learned what 
does and what does not work which 
can only help the success of the next 
series. 

— Mary Kennedy 

Student Life / 183 




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Janice Gill 

One of the highlights at the RAT in the 
84-85 season was a unique concept 
known as "AIRBAND." Gone were the 
days when young hopefuls were forced 
to sing to their hairbrushes while drying 
their hair before their morning classes. 
Now, with the aid of tennis rackets, 
hockey sticks and spoons, future stars 
could perform "live, on stage," before 
screaming fans to the music of such BC 
favorites as Springsteen, the Stones and 
the Jackson Five. 

The event was hosted Py emcee 

184 / Student Life 




1 



David Smith complete with with tux and 
jokes. Behind the scenes (and on stage), 
was the man was the man directly re- 
sponsible for organizing the AIRBAND 
Contest — Chris Patton. While a panel of 
four judged each of the groups on the 
categories of talent, originality and 
dress, the reactions of an enthusiastic 
audience were certain to influence their 
decisions. Not only were people dense- 
ly packed atop tables and chairs as 
well as on the floor, but also outside the 
windows, eager to get a glimpse of this 



exciting experience. The active partici- 
pation of the crowd was contagious 
and a key factor in the success of the 
event. In fact, the spirit carried through 
the intermission while the masses joined 
the D.J. in singing Don McLeans' "Ameri- 
can Pie". 

Tying first place were "J.C.B.C", 
cleverly attired in priesfs vestments, and 
America's favorite kids who were trying 
to raise money for their parent's 
anniversary present, "The Silver Platters". 
Running close behind for second 






n 




place was the nasty Tina Turner wearing 
herfamous pout and black leathermini- 
skirt. In fairness to all, there were many 
fine acts entertaining us on stage that 
night and all should be congratulated 
for their performances. The AIRBAND 
Contest provided an enjoyable night for 
all present and an opportunity for those 
closet hairbrush performers to make 
their debut. 



Maureen McNicholl 



Airband 




Janice Gill 



Student Life / 185 



The Class of 



Rock Group 

1 Police 

2 Rolling Stones 

3 Beatles 

New Wave Group 

1 U2 

2 Police 

3 Squeeze 

Male Vocalists 

1 Bruce Springsteen 

2 David Bowie 

3 Phil Collins 

Female Vocalist 

1 Madonna 

2 Dianna Ross 

3 Tina Turner 

Song 

1 Name of Love 

2 Tootie Flutie 

3 American Pie 

Author 

1 Sidney Sheldon 

2 Ernest Hemmingway 

3 Steven King 

Book 

1 Gone With the Wind 

2 Thorn Birds 

3 Master of the Games 

Play 

1 Romeo and Juliet 

2 Chorus Line 

3 Grease 

Comedian 

1 Eddie Murphy 

2 Bill Murray 

3 David Letterman 

Commedienne 

1 Joan Rivers 

2 Carol Burnett 

3 Gilda Radner 

186 / Student Lite 



Hero 

1 Doug Flutie 

2 John F. Kennedy 

3 Mom and Dad 

Political Figure 

1 Reagan 

2 JF Kennedy 

3 Abe Lincoln 

Concert 

1 Police 

2 Bruce Springsteen 

3 Prince 




Movie 

1 The Big Chill 

2 Terms of Endearment 

3 Love Story 

Nightclub 

1 Metro 

2 Confetti's (Dallas) 

3 The Commons 

Happy Hour 

1 Granada Hotel 

2 Rachael's 

3 The Rat 

TV Show 

1 Hill Street Blues 

2 Dynasty 

3 Cheers 

Radio Station 



1 WBCN 

2 Kiss 108 

3 WZOU 

DJ 

1 Charles Laguidera 

2 David Allen Boucher 

3 Lisa lips 

Bar 

1 Who's on First 

2 MA's 

3 Daisy's 

Restaurant 

1 Friday's 

2 Bay Tower Room 

3 Piccola Venezia 

Soap 

1 All My Children 

2 General Hospital 

3 Ivory 

Moment 

1 Hail Mary Pass in the 
Miami game 

2 Falling Asleep 

3 Getting Buzzed 

Beer 

1 Budweiser 

2 Beck's 

3 Budweiser Light 

Drink 

1 Gin and Tonic 

2 Mudslide 

3 Ice Tea 

Munchie Spot 

1 White Mountain 
Creamery 

2 McDonald's 

3 Aisle of Store 24 

Cologne 

1 Polo 

2 Paco Rabanne 



1985 Favorites 



(continued) 
3 Old Spice 

Perfume 

1 Halston 

2 Opium 

3 Anais, Anais 

Plex Sport 

1 Racquetball 

2 Swimming 

3 Basketball 
Store 

1 Filene's 

2 Bloomingdale's 

3 The Limited 

Class 

1 Twoomey's Law Class 

21985 

3 History of Horror 

Car 

1 Porsche 944 

2 Mercedes Sports 

3 BMW 

Act 

ICool 

2 Sex 

3 Finding a freshman with 
points 

Expression 

1 The big hook-up 

2 Pumped 

3 What a Peach 

Time of the Day 

1 Late at night 

2 Morning 

3 Bedtime 

Ski Resort 

1 Killington 

2 Sugarbush 

3 Aspen 

Vacation Spot 

1 Greece 



2 Cape Cod 

3 Maine 

Summer Olympic Event 

1 Gymnastics 

2 Swimming 

3 Track and Field 

Winter Olympic Event 

1 Downhill Skiing 
2Figure Skating 
3 Hockey 

Theme Parties 

1 Christmas (semi-formal) 

2Limo 

3 Progressive 

Late Night Snacks 

1 Ice Cream 

2 Pizza 

3 Rice Cakes with Peanut 
Butter and Raisins 

Place to Study 

1 O'Neill Library 

2 New Drom Lounge 

3 In Bedroom 

Magazine 

1 Cosmopolitan 

2 Glamour 

3 Sports Illustrated 

Actor 

1 Robert Redford 

2 Clint Eastwood 

3 Dustin Hoffman 



Actress 

1 Meryl Streep 

2 Jessica Lange 

3 Debra Winger 

Pain 

1 Muscle 

2 Love 

3 Tickle 



Sex Symbol 

1 Richard Gere 

2 Heather Thomas 

3 Rob Lowe 

Freetime 

1 Socializing 

2 Sunbathing 

3 Taking Roadtrips 

Publication 

1 Globe 

2 Wall Street Journal 

3 The Heights 

Things to do 

1 Give and get a backrub 

2 Sleep 

3 Run 

Food 

1 Pizza 

2 Shrimp 

3 Ice cream 

Time of the Year 

1 Christmas 

2 Summer 

3 Football Season 

Slime Move 

1 Eating your way through 
the super market 

2 Going out with your best 
friend's boyfriend 

3 Hiding 7 people in a 2 
person hotel room 

Synonym for being 
drunk 

1 Trashed 

2 Wasted 

3 Bombed 

Survey conducted 
December 19, 1985 100 
surveys distributed, 68 
returned, 39 female, 39 
male, seniors only 

Student Life / 187 



Like Nature's pageantry we are always 
on the threshold of becoming some- 
thing new . . . Passing through seasons 
of sunshine and storm that help us to 
thrive and to grow. 

Nutured by our visions of a golden des- 
tiny, our hopes grow ever stronger, 
reach ever higher, seeking the endless 
possibilities of tomorrow. 

— Debra Manning 




Geoff Why 



188 / Student Life 






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Student life / 189 



Being Yourself 



Of course the weather influenced 
peoples' moods. Try to imagine this 
scene: suddenly, the Heights was 
buzzing and tanned students clad in 
t-shirts, shorts, and donning the ever- 
popular Ray-Bans were sprawled out 
on the Dustbowl. The Mods 
abounded with hibachis and a con- 
tinuous flow of beer ran from the kegs. 
The anticipatory climate was char- 
acterized by lively chatter rising from 
outdoor happy hours. Could you 
guess which season governed this 
scene? 

The sociable, expectant atmos- 
phere which pervaded BC when stu- 
dents returned to begin another year, 
was in sharp contrast to the quiet, 
cozy days of winter. Winter was a time 
when moods began to change 
easier and a lot quicker. The weather 
made all the sun bums dream of war- 
mer days and chronically complain 
about the situation at hand. To com- 
bat this point, spending time with 
close friends was preferred to ventur- 
ing out into the biting cold. 




Makis latridis 





Alison Brooks 

190 / Student Life 



Mary Leonard 




(continued) 

The physical appearance of the 
campus itself 'weathered' any sea- 
son, and during the winter months, 
there were few things as picturesaue 
as Gasson tower at snowfall. It was 
this subdued attitude that allowed 
students to fully appreciate the arrival 
of spring. 

Students who got 'spring fever' 
guenched this desire by getting rid of 
their 'cabin fever' and venturing to 
Florida for Spring Break. It was a per- 
fect upper to put an end to the dol- 
drums of a cold northern winter. 

Springfest Weekend marked the 
official beginning of spring at BC, cul- 
minating with the Boston Marathon 
on Heartbreak Hill. Once again, the 
students came alive as optimism and 
a renewed energy took over the Bos- 
ton College campus — in the dust- 
bowl, frisbees were flying, the tennis 
courts were full and the Resevoir 
challenged tireless runners. 

Spring would guickly become 
summer and all too soon, the season- 
al clock would drift to another Sep- 
tember and the Heights would greet 
returning students once again. 

— Maureen McNicholl 



Deirdre Reidy 




Student Life/ 191 



Is Coke It? Drugs at BC 



While some students came to BC for 
the football or the Jesuit tradition there 
are many who chose BC primarily be- 
cause it was known as a partying 
school. 

Although the subject was considered 
somewhat of a taboo by the administra- 
tion it was no secret to undergraduates 
that marijuana and cocaine were pop- 
ular among many stuaents. For some 
students alcohol and drugs became a 
problem. Addiction was not un- 
common. 

The good times or addictions of some 
students was the income of others. For 
some selling cocaine was a way to pay 
their $10,000 tuition bill without working 
full time. The fall of 1984 saw two students 
thrown off campus for intent to distribute 
cocaine. That charge became quite 
controversial since it followed the arrest 
of one of the football players for posses- 
sion of cocaine and he was not asked to 
leave campus housing. These two inci- 
dents made it clear that despite the 
hush hush attitude drugs were a big part 
of the BC community. 




Andy Ryan 




Peter Hillenbrand 

192 / Student Life 



Tried and True 



Mary Ann's — (affectionately known as 
MA's) — Truly a BC hangout. One al- 
ways found someone he knew drinking 
here on any given night. Thursday nights 
were for freshmen, while Wednesday 
nights were big for Juniors and Seniors. 
Always crowded late night, MA's was 
home to "preps and pigs". 

Chips — When MA's was too crowded, 
Chips caught the overflow. Smaller and 
more subdued than MA's, it was per- 
fect for those who felt too cool to deal 
with crowds and conversation. 

Sam's — (short for Play it Again Sam's) 
— Although not in walking distance 
from BC, Sam's was conveniently lo- 
cated off the B-line. What made Sam's 
so special was its large drinks and its 
extensive ballot of films shown down- 
| stairs. It offered a large Sunday brunch 
— a perfect cure all for nagging Sunday 
morning hangovers. 



Who's — (Better known as Who's on 
First?) — The bawdiest of all bars BC 
students ever patroned. Freshmen went 
for the Friday happy hours only to never 
return Sophomore, Junior or Senior year. 
It was great for those who loved scream- 
ing, singing, chugging and falling in two 
inches of dirt and beer. One never wore 
their favorite shoes or new sweater. 

The Backyard — A quiet quiche and 
salad place. If you were tired of all the 
typical BC hangouts, this place was 
great for quiet, meaningful conversa- 
tion. Occasionally, one might have 
spotted a BC couple sharing a bottle of 
wine here! 

White Mountain — With lines that went 
out the door, White Mountain Creamery 
was the place for procrastinators with a 
sweettooth. Like the bars, this place was 
guaranteed to be crowded late at 
night. White Mountain was responsible 



for the Freshman fifteen still seen on 
Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors. 

Uno's — (Pizzeria Uno's) — A fun place 
to go to grab a pizza. When there was 
nothing better to do, one could always, 
"go to Uno's and then decide". 

FFF — (Fantastic Food Factory) — Lo- 
cated at the corner of Chiswick Road 
and Commonwealth Avenue, this was 
the home of greasy pizza and gooey 
Ice Cream. Consuming food from FFF 
more than once a week probably 
would result in cancer. 

Christy's — ("Open all night!") — When 
there was no food in the apartment and 
only a handful of change in a coat 
pocket, one was bound to find some- 
thing that would cure the hunger pains 
here. Located across from MA's, this was 
often the last stop before returning home 
from a rough night of "socializing". 

— Clare Kennedy 




Peter Hillenbrand 



Student Life / 193 




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Activities 



Peter Hillenbrand 

194 / Activities 






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Activities / 195 



A New UGBC 




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196 / Activities 



The 1984-1985 academic year 
marked a new era for the Undergradu- 
ate Government of Boston College 
(UGBC). The undergraduate govern- 
ment, headed by president Jeff Theil- 
man, began a multitude of new pro- 
grams so there would be an activity on 
campus every night. 

The campus pub series kicked off the 
new school year with wild new events 
like, "The Sunday Night Cafe". "Monday 
Night Football/Baseball". "Pizzas and 
Pitchers" and "Attitude Adjustment 
Hour". 

In addition to the Campus Pub Pro- 
gram the government sponsored a 
series of Social Justice Lectures. The lec- 
tures included William F. Buckley, repre- 
sentatives of Mothers Against Drunk Driv- 
ers, Dr. Ruth Westheimer, and John 
Anderson. Topics ranged from "The 
Controversy over Abortion" featuring 
Phyllis Schaffley and Sarah Weddington 
to "Alcohol in Advertising" lead by Jean 
Kilbourn. 

The Humanities Series featured Daniel 
Berrigan, SJ. "Reading from his poems", 
James Tobin, "Full Prosperity or Stagfla- 
tion", Denis Donoghue, "Resenting the 
Past", Denise Levertov, "Reading from 
her poems", and Peter Arnott, "Oedipus 
the King". 

"The Weekend Series" designed by 
the committees on the programming 
board introduced innovative ideas 
which had never hit the Heights before. 
Pep Rallies, a "Burger for a Buck" barbe- 
que, Monte Carlo Night in O'Connell 
House, and a "Homecoming Worth 
Coming Home For" were just a few of the 
new events. 

The Film Board, O'Connell House and 
the Casba featured traditionally popu- 
lar movies such as West Side Story, 
The Graduate, Boys from Brazil and 
Sleeper. More current films like Terms 
of Endearment, Splash, and The 
Deer Hunter were also available for 
student entertainment. 

Murray House continued its tradition of 
Spaghetti Dinners and the Piano Bar, 
The staff of Murray House also intro- 
duced new items such as the Thursday 
Barbeque and an Outdoor Movie Spec- 
tacularto their agenda this year as well, 
however. 

UGBC also provided the BC commu- 
nity with such imperative programs as 
the book co-op. The co-op enabled 
students to exchange used books for far 

Jeff Thielman and members at work in the 
UGBC offices. 




Mark Mendolla 

less than they cost to purchase at the 
bookstore. The co-op could save a stu- 
dent up to 200 dollars a semester, quite 
a hefty sum for the average undergrad 
budget! 

A Festival Of Friendship was under the 
direction of UGBC too. It provided a day 
for interaction between student volun- 
teers and children with special needs in 
the surrounding community. 

The Free University, otherwise known 
as "Free U" offered students courses 
which were not available in the regular 
curriculum like "Bartending" and "CPR". 

Information about programs like Free 
U was brought to the attention of the 
student body through the Communica- 
tions Committee. This hardworking 
group was responsible for all UGBC 
publications such as the Freshman Reg- 
ister and the UGBC Newsletter. 

— Geri Murphy 




Mark Mendolla 



Activities/ 197 



Stop the Presses 



Each and every Monday morning stu- 
dents headed toward McElroy to pick 
up the weekly issue of one of the school 
newspapers. The Heights was Boston 
College's independent, copyrighted 
student weekly that was recognized as 
BC's most familiar publication. Each 
week the staff produced a quality 24 to 
36 page newspaper that allowed the 
diverse voices of the student body to be 
heard. 

The weekly publications offered stu- 
dents up-to-date coverage of local 
events, as well as an overview of press- 
ing national and international issues. 
The Heights not only provided students 
with news, but also with campus infor- 
mation, extensive sports reviews, spe- 
cial events of the week, and editorials. 
The Heights helped make the student 
body of Boston College more aware of 
the matters that both directly and in- 
directly shaped their lives and society. 

Editor-in-Chief Ceci Connolly 

Managing Editor Bernie Coccia 

News Editor Kelly Short 

Features Editor Paul Cloos 

Sports Editor Jim Van Anglen 

Photography Editor Janice Gill 

Copy Editor Mike Corcoran 

Graphics Editor Angela Binda 



Associate Editor Terence Connors 

Associate Editor Heather Kelley 

Sub Turrl, the yearbook of Boston 
College, was one of the most awaited 
and celebrated publications of BC's 
second semester. Students, especially 
seniors, flipped through the pages of this 
precious recording of memories of Bos- 
ton College and the surrounding com- 
munity. For nearly three quarters of a 
century. Sub Turrl had documented 
happenings, events, and activities that 
occured "under the tower" during the 
course of the academic year. 

This professional publication was 
completely student created by a dili- 
gent staff of writers, photographers, and 
editors who work some 40-plus hours a 
week, many times pulling "all nighters" 
to document and record an everlasting 
book of memories of the Heights. 
Editor-in-Chief. Geraldine Tara Murphy 
Managing Editor . . .Cheryl Cappuccio 
Business Manager . . . Kerstin R. Gnazzo 

Photography Editor Makis latridis 

Layout Editor George Nunno 

Student Life Editor Deirdre Reidy 

Student Life Editor Clare Kennedy 

Senior Section Editor Roberta Blaz 

Sports Editor Tony Cammarota 

Academics Editor Sue Spence 



Advertising Editor. . .Cheryl Cappuccio 

Activities Editor Amy Frocossini 

Activities Editor Kathy Reilly 

Boston Editor Colleen Seibert 

Boston Editor Tom McMorran 

Copy Editor Keith Gnazzo 

Copy Editor Tania Zielinski 

Asst. Photo Editor Geoff Why 

Asst. Photo Editor Andy Ryan 

The Observer, in its third year at this 
printing, was still fighting to remain a 
permanent fixture on the BC campus. 
With no office, no typesetting equip- 
ment and no support from the school, 
The Observer had become an under- 
ground publication of sorts. Yet a fresh 
group of students set out at the begin- 
ning of the year determined to further 
the development of the paper, hoping 
eventually to rival The Heights in terms 
of circulation and staff. 

The Observer was founded as an 
independent student publication de- 
voted to both campus and national 
issues. However, publisher Rick Rizzo 
and editor George DeAngelo began 
the year with the goal of increasing cam- 
pus coverage while reducing political 
commentary. In doing so, The Obser- 
ver helped to create a forum for de- 
bate among students at BC. Moreover, 




Mark Mendolla 
198 / Activities 





Mark Mendolla 

the Observer had provided informa- 
tive and interesting coverage of movies, 
entertainment, sports and literature. 
Through increased fundraising efforts 
and continual alumni support, the 
Observer was able to double its cir- 
culation and increase its off-campus 
distribution. 

The content of the Observer was 
written by a staff of regular contributors. 
There were also a dozen regular staff 
members who assisted as sales repre- 
sentatives, circulation aides and typists. 

The Observer was one of many new 
student publications promoting a con- 
servative agenda. Yet the Observer had 
no affiliations with any political party. In 
1984 the Observer was cited by various 
national and local publications as an 
outlet for the latest conservative youth 
movement. 

Editor George DeAngelo 

Publisher Rick Rizzo 

Managing Editor Pete Clifford 

Associate Editor Wells Hansen 

Contributing Editors — John Birkmeyer, 
Pat Dunne, Steve Fitzgerald, John Flat- 
ley, Cathy Gabis, Jackie Ginley, Al 
Nefedov, Bob Smith 

Photography Editor Bill Ayers 

Layout Manager Chris Quinlan 

Circulation Manager . . John Birkmeyer 



Activities / 199 



On Your Toes . . .And Off 




t&** 



200 / Activities 






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Makis latridis 




The audience members were settling 
themselves in their seats and the house 
lights dimmed. The music's soft rhythmic 
beat began to pulsate throughout the 
auditorium as the spotlights flashed live- 
ly patterns on the empty stage. Sudden- 
ly, the bright light was filled with a mass 
of vibrant color which moved in motion 
synchronized with the music. It whirled 
and leapt about the stage, daring the 
spotlight to follow its energetic pattern 
until it reached a climax filled with elec- 
trifying emotion. At this point the music's 
tempo slowed and the lights dimmed 
leaving the stage in paralyzing dark- 
ness. The audience searched the dark- 
ness for the mysterious vision of color 
which had mesmerized their attention. 

This motion was a live performance of 
the artistic talent in BC's Dance Ensem- 
ble. Each fall the entire BC community 
was free to audition for the ensemble 
which graced the stage with ballet, 
jazz, tap and modern dance. The 
troupe was dedicated to enlightening 
the audience with the art and beauty of 
interpretive dance as well as fostering 
an appreciation of the dancers' talents. 
The presentation format encouraged 
the students to personally choreograph 
the dance and select their own partici- 
pants. 

The 1984-85 Ensemble was directed 
by Ann Archimbaults and aided by As- 
sistant Directors Allyson Hawkins, Mau- 
reen McFarlane and Suzie O'Grady. The 
season's hit performances included 
"Cabaret" for Parents Weekend and the 
Autumn performance of "Baby I'm a 
Star." 

— Tania Zielinski 



Andy Ryan 



Activities/ 201 



Noteworthy 



The 1984-85 edition of the Boston Col- 
lege band continued to live up to the 
rich tradition of past BC music ensem- 
bles. Through dedication and many 
hours of hard work, this unit matured to 
perfection during the course of the past 
year. 

The band was 190 members strong, 
with the color guard, the twirlers, and the 
band itself included in this figure. Peter 
Siragusa once again engineered this 
fine group of young individuals as he 
has done for the past 35 years. Siragusa 
stressed perfection, and his persistency 
was a key factor to the success of the 
Screamin' Eagles Band. 

Even though Siragusa was in charge 
of the group, much control of the band 
was taken by the students themselves. 
Heading the student elite was Band 
President Mark DiVincenzo, who totally 
dedicated himself to his duties. The 
Vice-President was Margaret Neeser 
while the Secretary was Renee Sullivan 



and the Treasurer was David Sullivan. 

The band, which is the largest orga- 
nization on campus, had a great sea- 
son which was highlighted by a trip to 
the Miami football game. Also, the 
band gave its total support to the school 
by playing at all of the home sports con- 
tests. 

The University Chorale also had 
another tremendous year in 1984-85. For 
those not familiar with this organization, 
it was a singing group which featured 
liturgical music, but also performed 
contemporary music as well. 

The Chorale was once again headed 
by Dr. C. Alexander Peloquin, who con- 
ducted the organization for his twenty- 
ninth straight year. Peloquin was known 
as a Composer-in-Residence. He also 
was an accomplished pianist and con- 
ductor, as well as being a renowned 
interpreter of liturgical music. 

As for the Chorale itself, it was com- 
posed of 140 members, which included 



undergraduate students, faculty mem- 
bers, and graduate students. The group 
performed many concerts and masses 
during the Academic Year. Also during 
the 1984-85 year, the organization par- 
ticipated in the T O'Neill Library Dedica- 
tion to Speaker of the House Tip O'Neill. 

The musical combination was not 
confined to the limits of Boston College. 
They had in the past travelled to such 
places as Rome, New York City, Lon- 
don, Washington D.C., and Paris. The 
1983-84 edition of the Chorale travelled 
to West Germany. 

The University Chorale had another 
impressive turnout during the past year. 
With a dedicated group of young 
adults, this organization continued to 
strengthen its strong roots. 

— K.G. & L.M. 

The B.C. Chorale performs at the O'Neill Li- 
brary dedication. 




Staff Photo 



202 / Activities 




Staff Photo 



Activities / 203 



Faces of the Future 



The Student Admissions Program was 
one of the largest student organizations 
on campus. This year over 800 students, 
from all four undergraduate schools, 
volunteered their efforts in hopes of con- 
veying their pride in BC to applicants 
and their parents. During this 1984-85 
academic year, the program grew 
under the direction of Theresa Chmara, 
Head Coordinator, in both number of 
volunteers and in the diversity of services 
offered to the Admissions Office. 

The Day Visitation Program was the 
best way for a high school student to get 
acquainted with BC. Every weekday 
during the academic year, dozens of 
SAP volunteers greeted prospective BC 
students with similar academic interests 
and spent the day with them on the 
campus. 

Tour and Group Information Sessions 
were also another area where SAP 
volunteers helped prospective students 
learn about BC. Over 100 students volun- 
teered their time as tour guides of the 
campus and another two dozen con- 
ducted Group Information Sessions at 



the office, where they gave a presenta- 
tion of BC facts and then answered any 
questions about the college. 

Special programs were also active in 
the SAP this year. AHANA (Afro- 
American, Hispanic, Asian and Native 
American), a program which dealt pri- 
marily with minority admission, had a 
greater amount of volunteers this year 
than ever before. Coordination and De- 
velopment, a special program which 
dealt with a potpourri of projects, ran 
such events as the socials, the Letterwrit- 
ing Campaign, and the Newsletter, ful- 
filling its goal of establishing greater 
communication within the program and 
with prospective students. 

Coordinators for the 1984-85 program 
were: Theresa Chmara, Head Coordi- 
nator; Andi Mullin, Interview Coordina- 
tor; Jane Papademetriou, High School/ 
Vacation Bisit Program; Cynthia Bailey 
and Rich Ferrara, Day/Overnight Visit 
Program; Mymie Breton, AHANA; Jim 
Treanor, Tours; and Mark Seman, Coor- 
dination and Development. 

— Mark Seman 




Geoff Why 




Geoff Why 

204 / Activities 



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Activities / 205 



Gold Key Blood Drive 




Holly Hillenbrand 

206 / Activities 



Every Drop Counts 




The American Red Cross Blood Ser- 
vices, Northeast Region, gave service to 
two hundred hospitals in Maine and 
Massachusetts. They collected 1,300 
pints everyday in order to meet patients' 
needs. 

Three times during the academic 
year, fall, winter, and spring, the Gold 
Key Society sponsored Plood drives on 
both the Chestnut Hill campus and the 
Newton campus. The Gold Key assisted 
the Red Cross by providing publicity, a 
location, and workers during the drive. 
Boston College was noted as one of the 
leading donor communities in the state 
of Massachusetts. 

Giving blood was a very satisfying ex- 
perience for many. Knowing that it 
could have saved another's life was a 
great feeling. Like they said, "Every drop 
counts." 

Gold Key members helping out with the Blood 
Drive at BC. 



Holly Hillenbrand 



Activities / 207 



Talk It Up 




Geoff Why 

208 / Activities 



Show and Tell 




Geoff Why 



There were many different 
alleyways one could follow if they were 
interested in the field of Communica- 
tions. Boston College, through WZBC 
Radio Station, The Filmboard, and the 
Advertising Club, offered students a 
chance to get a head start in their field 
of work. All three clubs were exclusively 
run by Boston College students who pro- 
fessionally learned how to inform and 
entertain their fellow classmates. 

WZBC, the BC radio station, was 
broadcast on both AM and FM. While 
oroviding the listening audience with a 
wide variety of music, WZBC-FM also 
offered educational and informative 
programming. Under the guidance of 
General Manager, Kevin Convery, the 
radio staff organized a selective and 
diverse program schedule, allotting 
time on weekdays from public affairs 
shows dealing with such subjects as 
faith healing, sports, and controversial 
BC issues. Block programming was used 
on weekends, specifying definite, edual 
time for musical and informative 
listening. 

Unlike WZBC-FM, WZBC-AM broad- 
cast only to the BC campus. It is at this 
station that beginners in radio gained 
experience in radio announcing. 

Students, if not interested in radio, 
could become familiar with the film in- 
dustry through involvement in the Film 
Board. Headed by chairperson Mike 
Nyklewics, this club entertained the 
campus weekly by selecting and show- 
ing a variety of films. On Fridays and 
Saturdays, these films were shown on 
Main Campus in McGuinn auditorium, 
while on Sundays they were shown in 
Barry Arts Pavillion on Newton Campus. 
The diverse selection allowed every BC 
student an opportunity to view films of 
their preference. Rear Window, West 
Side Story, and Trading Places were a 
few of the favorite movies offered by the 
Film Board in 1985. 

In order to encourage a better under- 
standing of various aspects of the 
advertising field, the Advertising Club of 
Boston College came into existence. 
Members of this club were exposed to 
both good and bad advertising skills, 
allowing them to distinguish between 
different types of promotion. The club, 
led by President Barry Hutchinson, spon- 
sored guest speakers, workshops and 
field trips to different advertising agen- 
cies. Members received, through these 
activities, a better understanding of the 
jobs that will hopefully be facing them in 
the near future. 

— Amy Seigenthaler 

Activities / 209 



Community Awareness; 



Several organizations at Boston Col- 
lege were dedicated to serving others in 
the Catholic tradition. 

The Gold Key Society was one of 
the largest student organizations at Bos- 
ton College. Its members had an oppor- 
tunity to serve the university and its sur- 
rounding community through a number 
of diverse service oriented events. 
Friendship, the sense of community ser- 
vice, and sacrifice were the aims of this 
group, Gold Key members could be 
seen ushering at athletic events, lectures 
at the new theater, and during Orienta- 
tion week. Members also worked with 
off-campus organization such as the . 
Red Cross Blood Drives and Boston Citi- 
zen Seminars. The president of this orga- 
nization in 1984-85 was Lisa Berm- 
ingham. 

Circle K was the world's largest col- 
legiate service organization, repre- 
sented by over 700 clubs located on 
campuses throughout the Western 
Hemisphere. Its members were those 
who wished to become involved in acti- 
vities and projects which served the 
community's needs. Besides partici- 
pation in service activities, members 
also were involved in social events, 
learning leadership skills, working with 
business and community heads, and 
forming long-lasting friendship while 
striving toward common goals. 

The Student Council for Excep- 
tional Children was part of the School 
of Education and was active in helping 
and entertaining children with special 
needs. This organization was nation- 
wide and was open to any concerned 
student, regardless of their major. This 
chapter organized and threw parties and 
fundraisers for the Campus School. 



Members also planned events with the 
Festival of Friendship and the Special 
Olympics. 

PULSE was a social service group 
which worked with communities and in- 
stitutions throughout the Boston area, 
stressing disciplined philosophical and 
theological reflection in the classroom 
and in society. Through the combination 
of reflective, academic work and field 
experience, the program encouraged 
the student to form critical perspectives 
on society, community and self. Stu- 



dents were encouraged to analyze the 
causes and complexities of social order 
and disorder, and to foster a commit- 
ment to personal responsibility for 
addressing these injustices. 

The program provided placements in 
such areas as: research and legal work, 
emergency services and shelters, spe- 
cial needs, the elderly, mental health, 
correctional systems, youth work and 
peace work. The group was continually 
investigating and expanding new 
placement prospects through the PULSE 



210/ Activities 




Makis latridis 



(continued) 

Advisory Program. 

1984-85 was PULSE'S fifteenth 
anniversary on the BC campus and 
,many special events were planned to 
celebrate the occasion. 

The NAACP or National Association 
for the Advancement of Colored People 
continued its concern for helping black 
students coordinate their educational, 
personal and career needs and goals. 
By sponsoring activities like membership 
drives and job fairs, they provided stu- 
dents with guidance in obtaining their 
goals as college students. The president 
of NAACP for the 1984-85 academic 
year was Maya Handwerk. 

— Kathy Reilly 




Makis latridis 




Activities / 211 



Escape Hatches 




212 / Activities 




Makis latridis 



When those books become too much 
of a headache and it was time to let off 
a little steam, students always headed 
jforthe nearest cafeteria. Food, the tradi- 
tional cure for study blues, provided not 
only energy but a chance to socialize 
with friends. Eagles Nest and McElroy 
Dining Hall were some of the favorite 
places to venture out to. 

Eagles Nest, conveniently located 
near the post office, was often the spot 
for the old habit of "scoping." It was a 
great place to munch on a blueberry 



muffin and cup of coffee while check- 
ing out who was walking by and calling 
to friends. Lyons Hall was a big social 
place, particularly for commuters. The 
discarded cups and napkins became 
almost part of the establishment as stu- 
dents bustled in and out between 
classes. 

Haley House served as an action/ 
resource base promoting social justice 
concerns at BC. The ten member resi- 
dent staff shared a community living ex- 
perience and provided lectures, films, 



and workshops on a variety of contem- 
porary social issues, considering them 
primarily from the perspective of justice. 
The personal committment of commu- 
nity-living, coupled with an active con- 
cern for those in our wider social spheres 
provided a foundation for responsive 
and responsible living. 

Some of the services included a net- 
work which provided a forum for repre- 
sentatives of affilliated groups on cam- 
pus to share information and develop 
skills. They had a resource center that 
provided information on many social 
justice issues and groups. They had ben- 
efit coffeehouses and nights of cider 
and song in support of a local shelter or 
service organizations. Haley House was 
sponsored by the Chaplains Office. 

Murry House was the commuter cen- 
ter at BC. It contained meeting and 
function rooms, lounges, study areas, a 
TV, typing room and game room as well 
as complete kitchen facilities. The large 
backyard solicitated a variety of out- 
door activists ranging from barbacue 
fans to Frisbee and volleyball players. 

Murray House provided a place for 
commuters to get together for entertain- 
ment and relaxation outside of the 
classroom. Student managers were 
Karen Brostoski, Mike Collins and Tom 
Shannon. 

Shaw House, the Honors Program 
House, was located on Upper Campus. 
The house provided a place where stu- 
dents could meet with various professors 
and talk informally about university mat- 
ters. 

Greycliff House was the foreign lan- 
guage house located on Common- 
wealth Avenue. The requirements of this 
house were that the residents speak in 
French or Spanish. What this did was to 
create an opportunity to practice one's 
ability to socialize in a foreign tongue. 
Obviously, the rewards for this were 
tremendous because everyone knew 
that true fluency only comes when you 
have to speak in that tongue all of the 
time. This helped in the classroom as 
well as providing a challenge to cam- 
pus living. 

Obviously, with the abundance of uni- 
versity houses that were designed speci- 
fically with programs which gave stu- 
dents a chance to get together and ex- 
press their views, opinions, or merely 
provided a place to "let it all hang out," 
these social outlets were the popular 
places to make that quick escape to. 
And so we did. 



Activities / 213 



O'Connell House 




Geoff Why 

214 / Activities 




As one clearly remembers, a stroll 
through the Upper campus revealed 
several brick and cinderblock structures 
which had been built in the traditional 
rigid manner of a dormitory building. 
Therefore it was always refreshing to 
view the stately mansion otherwise 
known as O'Connell House. Positioned in 
the middle of upper campus, it en- 
hanced the atmosphere with its classic 
architecture. 

O'Connell House was formerly the Lig- 
get Estate and was donated to Boston 
College as a gift from Cardinal O'Con- 
nell in 1937. Since the fall of 1972, it 
served the community as a Student 
Union. It was operated by Boston Col- 
lege and funds for programming events 
were furnished by the Undergraduate 
Government of Boston College. 

The staff consisted of five undergradu- 
ates contracted and supervised by the 
Office of Student Programs and Re- 
sources. Their duties included general 
operation and programming of events 
i'n the House. The management of 
O'Connell House was a very propitious 
experience for students not only be- 
cause of its development of future ca- 
reer possibilities but primarily because it 
contributed much to the personal 
growth of the people who worked and 
resided there. Staff duties included 
arranging and scheduling events of sig- 
nificant variety: drama, music, film, etc. 
Some of the film selections for the year 
included: The Graduate, Bedtime for 
Bonzo, The Wizard of Oz, Murder / And 
Then There Were None, The Return of the 
Pink Panther, The Sting and The Shining. 

The O'Connell House was known for 
drawing in crowds of fun-loving students 
and offered many traditional social 
events such as "Middle March Ball" and 
"My Mother's Fleabag". The former 
event included an interesting little 
means of purchasing tickets. Due to the 
tremendous popularity of this formal 
event, students were given mysterious 
clues prior to the sale of tickets so that 
only those who solved the riddles would 
know where the tickets were going to be 
sold. "Fleabag" was a comedy, mod- 
eled after the format of Saturday Night 
Live, which was performed by Boston 
College's own top comedians. 

The general uses of O'Connell House 
were divided into two areas. On week 
nights, O'Connell was used as a study 
facility, a meeting place and for special 
educational films, lectures and read- 
ings. Weekends were devoted to pro- 
viding the students with entertainment 
that was generally free of charge. 

The1984 staff were: Jim DiCorpoJohn 
Fuchs, Jennifer Hanlon, Lisa McLaughlin, 
and Leo Melanson. 

Activities / 215 




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216 / Activities 



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The World Hunger Committee 

worked on educating themselves, the 
BC community and the community sur- 
rounding Boston College about the 
world hunger crisis. To fulfill this mission 
they employed a variety of action tech- 
niques to bring about the necessary 
changes and also actively supported 
other groups working for these changes. 

Their primary event was the Oxfam 
Harvest in the fall as well as variety of 
other activities such as: pot-luck meals, 
speakers, and films which deal with 
topics such as nutrition, multi-national 
corporations and hunger in America. 

Student Ministry was a faith and 
value oriented group established to 
meet the spiritual needs of Boston Col- 
lege students. Their goal was to encour- 
age and facilitate personal growth and 
faith development through student in- 
teraction, participation, and leadership 
in various ministry programs. 

They offered students a means of in- 
tegrating their social and academic 
lives with thier spiritual ones. This in- 
cluded work which aided world hunger 
and social justice groups, singing in 
campus masses and working with the 
community. 

The Executive Coordinator for 1984-85 
was Kimberly Whitney and the Advisor 
was Rev. John A. Dineen, SJ. 

Campus Crusade for Christ was a 
group whose purpose at BC was to 
share the reality and relevancy of a vital 
personal relationship with Jesus Christ. 
Those who were interested were coun- 
seled and aided on how to begin or 
deepen their relationship with God. This 
was accomplished thru activities which 
included Bible studies, fellowship meet- 
ings, and lectures and films. President in 
1985 was Rick Vlaha and the Advisor 
was Prof. Robert Hisrich. 

Hillel was a Jewish student group 
which provided information on Jewish 
events in Boston and Israel programs. 
Activities included Shabbat dinners, 
Holocaust seminars, High Holiday 
arrangements and food collection. 
President was Steven Waxman. 

Under direction of coordinator Carol 
A. Woodworth, The Women's Resource 
Center was founded at Boston College 
in 1973 to support and encourage wom- 
en in the full attainment of their personal 
and professional goals. The center had 
a library which contained over 2,000 
volumes of works by women on a variety 
of subjects. Also there was a referral sec- 
tion which contained information about 
various services available in the Boston 
Area. This included Health, Legal Aid 
Personal and Career Counseling and 
Women's Organizations. Activities / 217 



Leading Us to New Heights 



The Academy of Sciences was 

made up of students motivated to learn 
about computer science, mathematics 
and natural sciences. Activities for this 
academy included active involvement 
in registration advisement, tutoring ser- 
vices and aiding other campus orga- 
nizations with advice on areas of sci- 
ence. 
President — David Mula 

The Accounting Academy pro- 
vided students with information con- 
cerning career opportunities in both the 
public and private sectors of the ac- 
counting field. Events in 1984-85 in- 
cluded a resume critique workshop run 
by Ernst and Whinney, a private panel 
discussion, the sixth annual Coopers 
and Lybrand barbecue, a seminar on 
the first two years in public accounting 
and a mock interview by Price Water- 
house. 
President — Michelle Wilson 

The Association for Women in 
Management was a pre-professional 
association that made BC students 
aware of the problems and opportuni- 
ties facing women entering careers in 
the business world. The association 
hosted speakers from various fields to 
speak about their work, and their re- 
lated experiences. 
President — Phyllis Fleno 

The Bellarmine Law Academy was 
open to all students interested in law 
school and careers in law. The 
Academy presented people from va- 
rious areas of the legal professions to 
acquaint students with the diverse acti- 
vities lawyers confront in contemporary 
society. This year guest speakers in- 
cluded Judge Nelson and Dean Huber 
from the law school. The Academy also 
sponsored a law student forum and a 
law night where judges and lawyers 
from the area came to share their ex- 
periences. 
President — Mark Lavoie 

The Chemistry Caucas was de- 
signed to assist the Chemistry Depart- 
ment in improving its course offerings 
and related services as well as serving 
as a link between students and the 
American Chemical Society and its pre- 
professional programs for those con- 
sidering chemistry careers. 
President — Michele Sherben 

The Computer Science Academy 
was designed to provide necessary in- 
formation and assistance to members of 
the BC community interested in compu- 
ters and computer related fields. The 
Academy sponsored lectures, semi- 

218 / Activities 



nars, career nights and social events to 
acquaint its members with various 
aspects of computers. 
President — Mary Esemplase 

The Economics Caucus was a stu- 
dent organization that was open to all 
undergraduates interested in Econo- 
mics. The caucus sponsored a career 
night and many social gatherings at 
which students and professors could 
meet. The caucus also organized de- 
bates with guest speakers arguing cur- 
rent economic issues. 

The Finance Academy was a forum 
for students interested in the finance 
area. One of the main objectives was to 
draw a closer student-faculty rela- 
tionship through joint endeavors and va- 
rious functions including socials, Alumni 
Night, and the Finance Spring Seminar. 
The Academy also provided tutoring 
services and career and academic 
peer advisement. 
President — Tim McCarthy 

The Fine Arts Union was a student 
organization involving both studio and 
art history majors as well as other majors 
who were concerned with acquiring 
knowledge of the fine arts. The Union 
organized student art shows, a lecture 
series, trips to art galleries and museums 
in Boston and New York, art sales and 
student art shows, 
President — Chip Ryan 

Geology and Geophysics Club 
sponsored lectures, geologic field trips 
and social events related to the field of 
Geology. The key to this club was active 
communication between the students 
and faculty. 

The Hellenic Society at BC spon- 
sored many events that included Greek 
Night, Greek socials, dinners to various 
Greek restaurants, a Greek salad and 
pastry sale and a spring trip to the play 
"Zorba the Greek". 
President — Maria Gammas 

The History Caucus was an associa- 
tion for history majors or other students 
interested in history. Members advised 
other students on academic and social 
issues and offered various social activi- 
ties for its members. 

The Investment Club at BC was de- 
signed to give interested students the 
opportunity to develop investment skills. 
Events included managing the club's 
actual portfolio, a lecture series featur- 
ing leaders in the investment community 
and other social activities. 
President — George Pavlov 

The Marketing Academy hosted 
activities including career night, semi- 



nars, interview workshops, guest speak- 
ers and social events that allowed 
members to become acquainted with 
field of marketing. This academy 
actively involved students in their career 
planning and marketing interests. 
President — William Sullivan 

The Mathematics Society of BC 
addressed the needs and interests of 
students in math related fields. The soci- 
ety sponsored a lecture series by em- 
ployment representatives, a free tutorial 
program for all undergraduate students 
enrolled in a math class and a wide 
range of student-faculty activities. 
President — Jamie Mainer 

The Mendel Club was open to stu- 
dents interested in pursuing health and 
science professions. One main aim of 
the club was to promote student-faculty 
interaction. Through member involve- 
ment in ten standing committees and 
visits from guest speakers, the club was 
able to present interesting news and 
projects in the health and science fields. 
President — Andreas Calianos 




Peter Klidaras 



(continued) 
Paraprofessional Leaders Group 

was a counseling group made up of 
active students with leadership, organi- 
zational end managerial skills. The 
leaders aided other groups and orga- 
nizations on campus and trained new 
advisors in academics, career plan- 
ning, health services and handicapped 
assistance. 

The Personnel Management Asso- 
ciation's aim was to extend interest in 
the field of Personnel and Human Re- 
source Management. The PMA spon- 
sored programs and guest speakers to 
provide information on important cur- 
rent topics in personnel. Career nights 
and faculty-student socials allowed in- 
teraction between BC students and the 
business community. 
President — Mark Silverio 

The Political Science Association 
was sponsored by the Political Science 
Department and members concerned 
themselves with working to improve the 
educational experience at BC. The 
association had seven committees that 
had specific duties to perform. The asso- 
ciation sponsored a departmental stu- 
dent-faculty social and a major seminar 



in both the fall and spring semesters 

along with the informal monthly faculty 

lectures. 

President — Maura Noone 

The Sociology Caucus consisted of 
a small dedicated group of students 
striving to become more acquainted 
with the field of Sociology. Their events 
included the sponsoring of a Sociology 
careers and opportunities workshop, 
various faculty-student socials, stronger 
advisement services and a newsletter. 

School of Education Senate con- 
sisted of six elected senators from each 
class, who in turn elected four officers. 
The senate was the official representa- 
tive body of the undergraduate students 
in the School of Education. Responsibili- 
ties included representation with prom- 
otion and tenure procedures, discussion 
of curriculum development, publication 
of the Campion Chronicle and sponsor- 
ing open forums and the Annual Inter- 
class Skits. 
President — Katy Page 

School of Management Senate 
represented students in Management 
through officers from each class. They 
reached the academic and social 
needs of the student body through acti- 



vities including the Executive Council, 
The SOM Faculty and the Educational 
Policy Committe on various matters in- 
cluding promotion and tenure of facul- 
ty, equity in student benefits and 
changes in the curriculum. The repre- 
sentatives also worked with the Honors 
Program. 
President — Dan Keating 

School of Nursing Senate members 
represented the student body by en- 
hancing student-faculty communica- 
tions and providing representation of 
student opinions. The senate actively 
participated in the National Student 
Nurses' Association and the Mas- 
sachusetts Student Nurses' Association. 
President — Wendy Shaw 

Evening College Senate repre- 
sented students from a wide variety of 
professions. Its objectives were to reflect 
student opinion and act as a liaison be- 
tween students and the faculty. The sen- 
ate also promoted the concept that 
knowledge was learned not only in the 
classroom, but also in everyday occurr- 
ences and other environments. 

— Amy Frocossini 




Activities / 219 



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220 / Activities 




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The 
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The Career Center at BC, located on 
Commonwealth Avenue, was a valu- 
able resource for helping students plan 
and choose careers, The staff encour- 
aged students of every class to start ear- 
ly in their career planning process. They 
continually advised, evaluated and 
assisted students in all stages of their 
career development. The Center had a 
comprehensive library of occupational 
information and reference information 
about careers, employers, graduate 
programs and job listings. It also main- 
tained a computerized career guid- 
ance, career presentations by alumni 
and employers, as well as group and 
individual counseling. 

Career Advisors conducted work- 
shops and seminars on a variety of 
topics, such as resume writing, writing 
cover letters, attending interviews and 
applying for jobs. The staff at the Career 
Center also retained student records 
and alumni credentials, while also pro- 
viding graduate schools and employers 
with student information. 

The Career Center sponsored pro- 
grams such as: On-Campus Recruiting 
sessions, where students were inter- 
viewed on campus by prospective em- 
ployers or representatives for profession- 
al or graduate schools. Career Days 
such as Law Day, and Nursing Career 
Day were sponsored by the Center. 

The Career Center and UGBC co- 
sponsored the Boston College Internship 
Program which provided listings of local 
internships, placements and contacts 
for those interested in obtaining job ex- 
perience in their fields of interest. 

The Transfer Center was available for 
undergraduate students who had trans- 
ferred in to the University or for those 
planning on transferring, Their principal 
goal was to make these transitions 
easier for students. 

The University Counseling Services 
were available to students in the form of 
confidential consultation in careers, 
academics and personal matters. 

— Kathy Reilly 

Activities / 221 



That's Entertainment 




Makis latridis 



222 / Activities 



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Makis latridis 



As the theater lights went dim and the 
chatter of the crowd simmered, actors 
backstage took their places to prepare 
for the long awaited opening night. 
Opening night came four times in 1984- 
85 to the Mamstage plays, and three 
times to the Second Season Society. 

The 1984-85 Mainstage season 
opened in October with its rendition of 
Bertholt Brecht's "The Caucasian Chalk 
Circle." This epic drama directed by How- 
ard Enoch provided an evening of ex- 
tensive music, poetry, and narration. The 
theatrical ensemble came back in De- 
cember to warm its frigid nights with one 
of the finest stage thrillers, "Deathtrap", 
by Ira Levin. This Mainstage production 
was directed by J. Paul Marcoux and its 
murder and mystery kept the audience 



on the edge of their seats all night long. 
The second semester brought a new 
dimension to the BC stage when 
LeMoyne College Theater company 
presented Shakespeare s romantic 
comedy "i he Twelfth Night However 
BC returned to its own stage at the end 
of FePruary for the play that outlined the 
historical relationship between Fn 
gland's Henry II and his queen, Eleanor of 
Aquitaine, directed by Reverend 
Robert Ver Eche, SJ The 120th theatrical 
Mainstage season for the BC Dramatics 
society concluded with the musical ver- 
sion of "The King of Hearts", a zany story 
of a number of supposedly mad char- 
acters. The play was set in France near 
the end of World War I and was directed 
by J, Paul Marcoux, and the musical 



direction was by Scott Tucker. 

Along with these four Mainstage 
shows, the cast performed three Second 
Season plays. These three plays were 
"Ernest in Love" directed by Will McGar- 
r anan Chamber Music directed by 
lohn Safina and Lover' directed bv 
Harold Pinter 

^s the 120th Dramatics season came 
to a close one concluded it was a 
theatrical success. Each of the perform- 
ances provided the BC community with 
the opportunity to see their fellow stu- 
dents at their best. As the curtain closed 
for the last time of the season, one knew 
it would only be for a short resting spel! 
only until a new group of talent 
came together in the fall to light up the 
stage soon thereafter for its 1 21 st season. 



m 



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Activities / 223 




Amnesty International was a 

world-wide, non partisan organization 
that worked for the release of prisoners 
of conscience, persons imprisoned for 
their political or religious Peliefs who 
have neither used nor advocated the 
use of violence. It also worked for the 
abolition of torture and capital punish- 
ment. The Boston College group was qn 
integral part of a network which in- 
cluded groups in as many as 78 coun- 
tries around the world. They wrote letters 
to and on behalf of prisoners of con- 
science and conducted campaigns on 
human rights abuses in various parts of 
the world. The group coordinator was 
Paul Nelson and the Advisor was John 
McDargh pictured above. 

The Democratic Club of Boston Col- 
lege, in common purpose with the Dem- 
ocratic Party of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts and the National Demo- 
cratic Party, are united in seeking for all 
peoples induvidual and political free- 
doms and social and economic justice. 

It was the goal of the Democratic 
Club to encourage increased partici- 



pation by students in the campaigns of 
Democratic candidates for state and 
national offices. Particularly interesting 
in 1985 was the presidential race which 
sparked interest in the political cam- 
paigns. The club promotes various 
events featuring Democratic candi- 
dates in hopes of enlisting students in the 
effort to elect Democrats to Office. The 
President in 1985 was Tony Barrueta and 
the Advisor was Prof. Marc Landy. 

Young Americans for Freedom 
was a group of young men and women 
whose interest is about the future of our 
nation and our world — people con- 
cerned about the problems we face to- 
day as individuals and as a nation. They 
believed that our nation could success- 
fully solve the problems which we face 
by remaining true to the principles of 
conservatism. 

YAF was an activist and educational 
group stressing the conservative philos- 
ophy. They felt that a growing central- 
ization of power had brought an in- 
creasing voilation of individual rights, 
with an enslaving dependency of more 



and more Americans on government. 

YAF activities included speakers, in- 
formation booths, literature distribution, 
films, and informing the university com- 
munity about the conservative view- 
point. 

The Environmental Action Center 
was a group which was concerned with 
our natural environment which is in ever 
greater danger of corruption due to the 
complexity of the technological world in 
which we live. The object was to join 
together all interested in the BC commu- 
nity and to educate the members as to 
the current dangers imposed upon our 
environment and then to take action 
against those dangers. Action included 
educating others and working toward 
political and ecomonic solutions by 
means of projects suggested by the 
members. All community members, stu- 
dents, faculty and staff were invited to 
join the Environmental Action Center 
and to bring with them new ideas on 
how to keep our environment healthy. 
The advisor was Dr. George Goldsmith. 



224 / Activities 




Photo Arrangement by Makis latridis 



Activities / 225 



OSPAR at BC 




Makis latridis 
Clockwise; Doug Dahl (freshman), Amy Gull- 
lemelle (senior), BUI Thompson; OSPAR Asst. Di- 
rector, Robin Joy Shepherd, Dept. Sec. 



Makls latridis 

226 / Activities 



OSPAR, The Office of Student Pro- 
grams and Resources, was an orga- 
nization which provided the BC student 
with an environment which encouraged 
and aided student clubs and organiza- 
tions. Under the direction of Carole 
Wegman, OSPAR was responsible for 
aiding individuals and student groups to 
set their goals and develope program 
ideas which would need support from 
various university departments, They 
offered advice on how to establish an 
organization or plan a social or cultural 
event and served as a liaison between 
the organization and outside agencies. 

Assistant Director Bill Thompson was 
responsible for the interaction between 
club formation and established universi- 
ty offices. He edited the Boston College 
Student Guide and chaired the Orienta- 
tion Committee. Jean Yoder was the In- 




Makis latridis 




ternatlonal Student Advisor. She pro- 
vided international students with infor- 
mation on the requirements and proce- 
dures of the US Immigration and Natur- 
alization Service. She advised the Inter- 
national Peer Assistants Programs and 
International Student Orientation. Her 
office duties included coordinating the 
Ticket Information Center, overseeing 
work study staff and assisting with Uni- 
versity budgets. 

OSPAR'S two secretaries, Laura Fried- 
rich and Robin Joy Shepherd, served a 
vital function in the organization of all 
office transactions. They served as the 
intermediaries who questioned students 
and directed them to the proper advi- 
sors. 

OSPAR served to personalize a stu- 
dent's environment through the devel- 
opment of many on-campus organiza- 
tions. They ran Organizational Develop- 
ment Workshops. This insured that 
groups got general public exposure 
with the Boston College Student Guide 
as well as various informative newslet- 
ters. Space requests for meetings and 
club functions were coordinated 
through the office. The Ticket Informa- 
tion Center was run by OSPAR. 

The Office of Student Programs and 
Resources encouraged students to 
make the most of their time on campus, 
They recognized the importance of 
academics, but they also emphasized 
the importance of broadening one's 
horizon by becoming a part of the uni- 
versity community. 

— Tania Zielinski 

Activities Day on the Dustbowl. 



Makis latridis 



Activities 7 227 



Ethnicity Down 



A very important part of a person's life 
is his or her cultural heritage. The myriad 
of different cultural clubs at BC proved 
that the need for education in and ex- 
pression of one's roots was a strong con- 
cern of students. The diversity of the 
clubs' activities showed that their mem- 
bers wanted to share their experiences 
with other students in the university. 

AHANA represented the interests of 
Black American, Native American, 
Asian American, and Hispanic students. 
The organization provided aid for those 
students needing academic, social or 
emotional support. The group spon- 
sored a summer orientation program to 
introduce freshman minority students to 
BC and its resources. AHANA advised 
other cultural clubs such as the Asian 
Students Club, La Union Latina, etc. Its 
members put out a newsletter entitled 
Collage and a radio program on WZBC 
named Expansions. 

The Armenian Club focused on stu- 
dents interested in the culture, arts, reli- 
gion and lives of the Armenian 
people. They did this 
through 



an Armenian-American intercollegiate 
dance with Tufts, a panel discussion on 
Armenian church unity and the celebra- 
tion of Armenian Martyr's Day in April. 
The club spread knowledge about Ar- 
menian life by donating books on the 
subject to the BC library each year. 

The Asian Students Club allowed 
BC students to observe and participate 
in the different facets of Asian life. This 
year the members held a Halloween 
Dance, a cultural night and a presenta- 
tion of five Asian dance companies. The 
club encouraged all students to attend 
their activities. Joel Binamira, '85 was this 
year's president. 

To make BC students aware of the 
diversity of Afro-American heritage and 
culture was the goal of The Black Stu- 
dent Forum. Their many activities in- 
cluded a Dance Marathon, a Jazz and 
R&B social, a T-shirt sale and hosting 
speakers from the business com- 
munity. 

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Cercle Francals was interested in ex- 
posing students to the social and cul- 
tural aspects of French life. This yearthey 
held a bake sale, and they planned 
trips to French films. They held socials to 
practice speaking in French and learn 
about French culture. Judith Gleba, '85 
was this year's president. 

One of the most active cultural clubs 
was II Clrcolo Itallano Its members ex- 
plored all the aspects of Italian life and 
language through trips to the North End 
and meetings with students of Italian 
culture to eat lunch and speak the lan- 
guage. One of their most rewarding ac- 
tivities was teaching English to Italian 
immigrants in Boston. These events were 
under the direction of President Carl Va 
leri, '86. 

The German Academy strove to 
foster participation 
and 



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228 / Activities 



Activities Row 



cont. from 228 

knowledge in the German culture. Their 
activities included an Octoberfest with 
UGBC and a Christmas social. Members 
of the German Academy also had the 
opportunity to visit to the Goethe Institute 
which promotes German culture in Bos- 

t ton, 

The Irish Society was a very tradi- 
tional club that enjoyed exploring the 
lives and loves of the Irish. This was ac- 
complished through a Celtic New Year 
party at O'Connell House, Ceilis, which 
were Irish square dances, and Simsas, 
which were meeting for the members. 
They also sponsored an Irish radio show 
on WZBC. This year's president was Roy 

: Maguire, '85. 

A new club at 
BC 



was the Middle Eastern Student's As- 
sociation which strove to promote the 
cultural, social and educational aware- 
ness of Middle Eastern life. The activities 
of this year's Middle Eastern Student's 
Association included a Mediterranian 
social with other cultural clubs in addi- 
tion to their soccer games every Sunday. 
This year's president was Lutof Awdeh. 

The Organization for International 
Student Affairs was a service organi- 
zation for foreign students at BC. The or- 
ganization urged interaction between 
international and American stu- 
dents. 

The 



Slavic and Eastern Circle not only pro- 
moted awareness of Slavic culture, it 
advised and served as a student 
caucus for students studying Russian, 
Slavic Studies or, Asian Studies. The 
members were interested in learning 
through plays and movies and they es- 
pecially enjoyed getting together to 
cook Russian food. 

A particularly active group was the 
Spanish Club. They worked at 
ELS, a school for 




■" to design bv 



pie from other coun- 
tries who wish to learn English inten- 
sively. They also had fun by having 
Spanish dinners, going to the Nut- 
cracker Suite, and participating in the 
audience of "Nosotros" — a Spanish TV 
show. 



La Union Latlna 

sponsored cultural and social 
events along with academic pursuits. A 
series of Spanish classical films was 
shown and the members also gave an 
exhibit of hand-made garments. The 
members tutored Spanish-speaking stu- 
dents in all subjects, as well. 
— Colleen Seibert 



Activities / 229 



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230 / Academics 



cademics 



Academics / 231 



Turn On 

ToBC 

Academics 



The students of Boston College were 
noted for many outstanding traits over 
the years. Magazines listed BC as one of 
the top ten partyingschools in the nation 
in the seventies. The "Preppy Hand- 
book" listed it as one of the top ten cam- 
puses in the eighties. And the Associ- 
ated Press listed its football team as 
number four in the country in the aca- 
demic year of this publication. But more 
attention needed to be turned to the 
roots of Boston College, its academic 
practices and standards. 

Boston College was recognized for its 
academic excellence for decades 
upon the commencement of the 1984- 
1985 academic year. And yet the Uni- 
versity decided to implement changes 
and new standards that year to put their 
best foot forward as well as keep pace 
with the other colleges across the na- 
tion. 

The major change for the university 
was the inclusion of a review of each 



student's record at the end of every se- 
mester. The biannual review, seemingly 
sparked by a controversy over the aca- 
demic standards of undergraduate 
athletes, was the creation of a commit- 
tee on academics and extracurricular 
activities. It was explained in a memo- 
randum to all students in late September 
by Father Fahey, Academic Vice Presi- 
dent. 

"Students may be dismissed if they 
accumulate excessive deficiencies 
(grade of either W or F] or if their cumula- 
tive average falls below the required 
minimum, ' the memorandum from 
Fahey explained. 

The "required minimum" grade point 
average was set at 1 .667. In other words, 
students could participate in extracur- 
ricular activities until their GPA fell to 
1.666. Not until three deficiencies 
occured would participation in activi- 
ties be disallowed. 

Student reaction to the new policy 
story cont. on 234 



1 




Peter Klidaras 




Peter Klidaras 



232 / Academics 








Makis latridis 



Peter Klidaras 



Academics / 233 



Turn On 

ToBC 

Academics 

was surprisingly uniform. Despite a front 
page article in the Heights and the let- 
ter from Father Fahey the majority of stu- 
dents auestioned were not aware of the 
new policy late into OctoPer and thus 
declined to comment on it. Students 
both on and off campus claimed that 
they received no such letter and there- 
fore did not understand the new policy. 

In other areas of academic life the 
university strived toward improvement of 
their level of academic integrity through 
the development and opening of the 
Thomas P. O'Neill Jr. Library located on 
middle campus. The library was dedi- 
cated to O'Neill in a gala ceremony 
held on October 14. The new "Central 
Library" immediately became a center 
of activity for the student body. Students 
not only attended the library to study but 
also to meet with groups for projects or 
just to get out and see others. 

Admissions for the class of 1989 also 
presented an increase in the level of 
academics for BC. Applications 
reached a record high at 14,398, a 16% 
increase over 1 984. The SATs of the 2 ,050 
chosen for the class of 1989 were 10 
points higher in both math and verbal 
scores. Though this did not seem to be a 
vast change it was significant for the 
students and the school as a whole. The 
increase in the average SAT score indi- 
cated an increase in The ability to han- 
dle the work load at BC. This allowed stu- 
dents more free time to participate in 
other activities on and off campus thus 
balancing their education. 

Members of the various honor pro- 
grams on campus maintained their tra- 
ditional standards of excellence in 
academics, extracurricular activities 
and character reguirements. The honor 
programs in each school provided ex- 
ceptional students with recognition for 
their talent and dedication. 

Though all students were not be 
accepted into the honor societies that 
graced BC this was not to say that the w 
did not work just as hard as those wh< 
were. Virtually every major at BC pre 
vided students with the opportunity t< 
work in the field that they were : ' 
terested in entering through an 
ternship program. These programs en- 
abled students to find out if the field they 
were studying was really for them. 

The honor programs, the internship 
programs, the new library and the stress 
on strong academic standards des- 
tined BC not only to be remembered by 
alumni as fun, pretty or having a great 
football team. Instead these programs 
instilled the BC community with the 
memory of their alma mater as a fine 

I institute of higher learning. 
- Geri Murphy 



234 / Academics 



BuSTQU^tGUXkt. 




Nurse Capping 



Boston College School of Nursing's first 
initiation into the clinical setting began 
with the series of capping events. Usual- 
ly the nursing students had a fun filled, 
enthusiastic dinner dance at the Park 
Plaza Hotel the Saturday evening prior 
to capping. Parents, boyfriends and 
roommates were all invited to this ele- 
gant night out on the town. The Park 
Plaza featured a delicious gourmet din- 
ner, a live versatile band and a large 
spacious dance floor to demonstrate 
exotic dance steps. Most students 
agreed that this evening was memor- 
able and a stepping stone for the future. 

Sunday arrived soon after the viva- 
cious evening out. Sunday was the se- 



rious day — the day in which sopho- 
more nursing students received their 
caps in St. Ignatius Church and wore 
their clinical uniforms for the first time. A 
subtle feeling of accomplishment was 
expressed by the innocent smiles on stu- 
dent nurse's face. Guest speakers, sig- 
nificant nursing faculty members and a 
Jesuit priest spoke to the audience and 
complimented the student's achieve- 
ments. Finally each student's name was 
called — the procession and distribu- 
tion of caps began, the names were 
called alphabetically, each row 
assembled itself in the aisle simul- 
taneously. Friends among nursing stu- 
dents applauded each other as the 



cap was placed on the student's head, 
a professional picture was taken, an in- 
dividual candle was lit and a long stem- 
med rose wqs handed to the newly 
capped nursing student. 

After everyone was capped, a 
farewell speech was heard. Everyone 
was invited to a reception in St. Thomas 
More Hall. The nursing students filed out 
and a SON portrait was taken on St. 
Ignatius Church steps. Students spent 
the rest of the day celebrating with fami- 
ly and friends. This was certainly a 
meaningful event which was cherished 
throughout a student nurse's career. 

— Emilie Ann Blais 




Mark Mendolla 

236 / Academics 




Mark Mendolla 



Academics / 237 



Where Should We Meet?! 



Did you ever plan to study and find 
that the spot was already occupied? It 
happened more than once, didn't it? 
You walked around the entire campus 
and still found yourself out of luck. That 
was probably because you were 
checking out all the standard locations 
where people traditionally study. 
Perhaps the third floor in Gasson? The 
lab rooms in Higgins? Or the most for- 
midable spot on campus, the library? 
Chances of finding space in these 
places was slim, especially around fin- 
als time. 

In accordance with this fact, many 
students managed to find refuge in the 
most unusual places imaginable. Take 
some pointers from these ingenious stu- 
diers. After all, how many times have 
you found the nearest tree occupied 
with scholarly BC students? How about 
your car? Maybe your bathroom, 
maybe not, but if you wait long enough, 
there's a good chance it'll be free soon 
. . . With all these diverse areas to crack 
the books, it shouldn't be too difficult to 
find a spot to study. So it's time to put 
your mind to the task. Think creatively!!! 

— Sue Spence 




Geoff Why 



*W----. 



Top: One student finds solitude between 
branches. Right: Another escapes behind 
the wheel. 



238 / Academics 




Geoff Why 



Academics / 239 



Teach Your 
Children Well 



Boston College faced the transition of 
the passing on of a number of dedi- 
cated professors during the 1984-85 
school year. Chestnut Hill was unfortun- 
ate enough to lose the services of four 
good men, John A. McCarthy SJ, James 
P. Larkin SJ, William Griffin, and Richard 
Shea SJ. 

Fr. McCarthy had been with Boston 
College since 1938, and he was part of 
the Philosophy Department. He was also 
dean of the College of Arts and Scien- 
ces from 1960 to 1964. Fr. McCarthy was 
laureated as BC's first Campus Council's 
Teacher of the Year Award, and an hon- 
orary Doctor of Letters in 1972. 

Larkin died at the age of 74 after a 
long illness on August 18, 1984. Larkin 
dedicated his life to Boston College and 
also to the Middle East. Larkin spent mis- 



sionary time in Iran and also Iraq. 

Griffin passed away on August 2, 1984 
after serving as Associate Professor in 
the School of Education at Boston Col- 
lege. Griffin was a World War II veteran 
who arrived at the BC School of Educa- 
tion in 1964. He was also Chairman of the 
Division of Education Administration 
and Supervision while at BC. 

Father Shea passed away on March 
25, 1984 after serving as University chap- 
lain, and literature, philosophy and the- 
ology. Shea was also a chaplain in the 
US Air Force, and then he became Uni- 
versity chaplain until 1969. 

An era of good has passed and these 
men will be sorely missed. They were 
great contributors to the BC as well as 
the world community. May they rest in 
peace. 



240 / Academics 



Dean Henry J. McMahon 



As the 1984 academic year ended 
we were saddened by the news that 
Dean Henry J. McMahon was ill, but the 
sadness was tempered by the word that 
he was recovering. When later we 
learned that he had died, the news 
struck with the suddeness as though he 
were the victim of an accident. This was 
so, I suppose, because no one could 
imagine Boston College without Henry, 
The event prompted an outpouring of 
sympathy and a tribute rare even for BC. 
Those of us associated with the University 
in all of the various ways it was served 
were joined by students and alumni who 
remembered how they were served by 
Henry. More impressive perhaps were 
the many whose association with the 
University as students, faculty and ad- 
ministrators ceased years ago. Thus it 
| was that Boston College, through its ste- 
| wards of the present and past, paid 
homage to one whose stewardship had 
; been served so faithfully. 

Now that some time had elapsed and 
we reflected to Dean McMahon's 
j death, our sadness in his absence was 
tempered by memories of him. Each of 
us remember him in his or her own way, I 
suppose, but it must be the recollection 
of incidents in our lives that were shared 
with him that we recall often. These re- 
membrances were an occasion of ple- 
asure for many. Those former students 
whose encounters with him were not the 
occasion for joy at the time will remem- 
ber him now in a different light, the illu- 
mination of mature experience. My 
memory of Henry covered many years. 
The first was as a classmate in the senior 
philosophy courses of the time. I did not 
know him, but recognized in him an un- 
usual man, an opinion that was con- 
firmed when he was elected to the 
Alpha Sigma Nu. It was not until years 
later that a close association with him. 
developed. As a department chairman 
I had many opportunities to observe him 
as a dean. Students who sought permis- 
sion for one reason or another might be 
surprised to learn that the Dean and I 
had many telephone conversations as 
he sought some way round a regulation 
that would benefit the student without 
doing violence to the rules or the Dean's 
keen sense of duty. It was through these 



conversations that I came to appreci- 
ate his devotion to maintaining high 
standards yet with a deep concern for 
the welfare of all students, for whom he 
had deep affection. 

I missed him at lunch this year. We 
often met there and enjoyed conversa- 
tion with colleagues. The topics were 
many and varied, often serious, but in- 
terspersed with humor. Henry thoroughly 
enjoyed a good laugh. Fresh in my 
memory also were the many occasions 
as we returned to our offices from McEI- 
roy that students stopped to inform their 
Dean that they had been admitted to 
law school or had other good news to 
relate. These were happy occasions for 
them and for me as an observer. Be- 
cause of his position Henry served on 
several boards and committees where 
his interest, close attention and dili- 
gence were apparent to all. He was re- 
quired also to attend many other func- 
tions of a more social nature where he 
always gracious and attentive to all. The 
faculty members and administrators 
alike enjoyed his company as he 
obviously enjoyed theirs. 

At the Commencement Ceremonies 
this year for the first time in many years 
Henry would not be present to carry the 
University Mace to lead the procession. I 
shall remember then what I had often 
thought over the years, "How appropri- 
ate that one so dedicated to University 
and its ideals should have this honor." 
Alumni, faculty members and adminis- 
trators shared this opinion I am sure. 

I used many commonplace words 
and phrases to describe Henry J. McMa- 
hon. They were all accurate, I believe, 
but they were the words that he would 
have used under similar circumstances 
as we shared a common heritage, edu- 
cation and culture. Among other virtues 
that were emphasized was reticence. 
To say that Henry displayed a concern 
for the ideals of Boston College and the 
students of Alma Mater is unfair to his 
memory. It would be more accurate to 
say that Henry had a deep and abiding 
love for Boston College and all who 
were associated with it, but certainly not 
the least, the students of Alma Mater. 
— Professor Robert O'Malley 



Academics / 241 



John McDargh 



Theology professor John McDargh 
built a strong reputation among stu- 
dents for teaching one of the finest the- 
ology courses on campus, "Faith and 
Identity." "Faith and Identity" was a 
small and highly popular class. Obtain- 
ing a place on McDargh's "Faith and 
Identity" syllabus was a difficult trick in- 
deed. But for those who did make their 
way into professor McDargh's course 
the effort proved to be well worth it. 

The main goal of the "Faith and 
Identity" course was to encourage the 
growth of the bond between the stu- 
dents' spiritual and personal facets. The 
course acheived that encouragement 
leading to growth for most of its students 
in many ways. Readings such as the 
biography of Malclom X by Alex Haley 
helped students see that others also 
faced the crisis of reconciling their faith 
with their self identity at some point in 
their lives. Additionally, the various read- 
ings offered different solutions to this re- 
conciliation thus assuring students that 
no one way was right. 

The second method of prompting this 
growth was through the keeping of a 
journal. Students were required to keep 
weekly entries in the journals. They re- 
corded events and the spiritual and emo- 
tional effects of those events. This con- 
crete account often helped students to 
gain perspective on where their faith 
was going and who they were. 

The class discussions provided the stu- 
dents with a forum to voice their experi- 
ences in and listen to the experiences of 
others. But the prevailing and best 
method of drawing out the growth of the 
student was found in the teaching 
methods of professor McDargh himself. 
His openmindedness spread to the stu- 
dents. Every student's opinion was wel- 
comed by every other student as a re- 
flection of oneself. But even more impor- 
tantly students could tell from professor 
McDargh's mannerisms that he was not 
playing a part. Professor John McDargh 
truly cared and diligently worked to 
help students to learn the experiences of 
others, to search for their self identity and 
their beliefs and to put those pieces 
together. 




I 0| I ML. «!Ti«-,AjWM V 












- 



, 




Makis latridis 



242 / Academics 



Donald Fishman 




Makis latridis 



Dr Donald Fishman, chairman of the 
communications department, taught 
what was to many communications stu- 
dents their most memorable course. Dr. 
Flshman's course lived in the minds of his 
students for the decades following its 
completion because each student was 
required to participate in a group 
project with five other students, selected 
by Dr. Fishman. The project required the 
students to write, design and perform a 
skit. During the course of producing 
these skits however the students were 
also required to analyze each other's 
behavior in the group. And of course, 
only one "A" would be given. 

Imagine it. What fun. Six college stu- 
dents thrown together with a little less 
than a month to write the script, design 
the sets and costumes, and leam their 
lines. (Where are the cue cards!? I forgot 
this part!) Meanwhile, they were all ana- 
lyzing every word and every movement 
each one made. Even things that some- 
one didn't do were recorded and 
picked apart. And each group member 
knew that while they were analyzing 
you, you were analyzing them. 

It seemed as though analysis was just 
what the doctor (Fishman of course) 
ordered. Many students were on the 
verge of needing therapy following the 
skits. And if they weren't, they looked as 
though they might. The last four weeks of 
the semester boasted speech com- 
munications students dressed as 
horses, tasmanian devils or the messiah 
standing in the hallway on the third floor 
of Lyons, blushing appropriately as 
others gaped and giggled on their way 
to class. Despite the embarrassment 
most students admit that they learned a 
great deal about group communica- 
tion through the project. They grew to 
understand where they fit into a group 
and what other types of people they 
could expect to find in the groups they 
would work in. 

A sigh of relief was expelled by most 
students after completing the Man and 
Communications course required, de- 
signed, and produced by Dr. Fishman 
because once it was out of the way Dr. 
Fishman became a friend rather than a 
foe. He was a valuable ally indeed. Dr. 
Fishman was available to all students in 
the communications department not 
only for advice but also for contacts. 
Internships as comfortable as well worn 
boots were set up by Dr. Fishman on a 
regular basis. But if the position was not 
working out he was always ready to lis- 
ten with a well trained ear. 

Academics / 243 



Eugene Bronstein 



The sign on the door of Fulton 301 G 
read Eugene Bronstein, Director of Hon- 
or's Program, School of Management. 
Students were in line in front of the door. 
Why? Because as a marketing natural, 
Bronstein knew how important it was to 
be visible. Fortunately, this was totally for 
the BC students' benefit. 

Bronstein, a History and Economics 
graduate of Dartmouth College, re- 
cieved his MBA from Harvard Business 
School. After graduation he began 
working in New York City in the market- 
ing management program at Abraham 
and Strauss. He soon moved up to the 
position of buyer and eventually came 
to Boston where he spent twenty years 
working for Filenes. As of 1985, Bronstein 
had left the business world and had 
been sharing his experiences with DC 
students for nine years. In the fall of 1983 
he was appointed as Director of the 
SOM Honors Program. 

In his nine years at BC, Bronstein soon 
established himself as a lecturer who 
clearly believed that the ultimate re- 
ward in any teaching situation was the 
self growth of the student. His sincere 
concern was not just limited to the class- 
room but extended to long after the 
class hours had concluded. How often 
had students thanked him for his time to 
which he would emphatically reply, 
raising his eyebrows and peering over 
the edge of hornrimmed glasses, "Don't 
thank me for my time, you're paying for 
it!" 

In the classroom and out one often 
heard Prof. Bronstein expound on his 
theory of the well rounded student. Sur- 
rounded by the business minds he 
would constantly antagonize the stu- 
dents, challenging them to experience 
areas out ot the traditional SOM arena. 
"It's important to me to see that the stu- 
dent is sensitive to areas which are 
beyond pure academics for it is the hu- 
man aspect on one's personality and 
not the mechanical training, which 
makes a successful manager." 

It is said that a teacher often identifies 
with the student who best harmonizes 
with his personal values and beliefs. 
Therefore, it was no surprise to hear Bron- 
stein relate the characteristics of his 
most memorable student. "A young 
man . . . with a zest for accomplishment 
. . . always questioning and provoking 
. . . great listener . . . compassionate 
and anxious to accomplish without 
being overly selfish." 

Sounds a lot like Eugene Bronstein. 




Makis latridis 



Christopher Wilson 




Makis latridis 



Professor Christopher Wilson had 
been a member of Boston College's 
English department for five years. Af- 
ter receiving his Bachelor of Arts in 
English at Princeton University, he 
went on to obtain his master's degree 
in American Studies at Yale. He had 
taught required courses for English 
majors, including Critical Reading 
and Writing and Practice of Criticism, 
English electives in American litera- 
ture and graduate courses for Ameri- 
can Studies. 

As well as teaching. Professor Wil- 
son was also the head of the Ameri- 
can Studies Program at Boston Col- 
lege. The masters program was not 
just the study of American history or 
American literature. It was the study 
of the American Society. On the un- 
dergraduate level, there was also an 
American Studies minor. It involved 
taking courses which focused on the 
American society in various disci- 
plines. These included English, Histo- 
ry, Sociology, Political Science and 
Fine Arts. By taking these courses, stu- 
dents obtained a broader perspec- 
tive of American culture. 

Professor Wilson saw the English de- 
partment as a strong branch of the 
university. With many talented profes- 
sors and many courses available, he 
felt the English department had a lot 
to offer. Though many courses were 
similar, each professor added their 
own style while at the same time 
meeting a goal set by the depart- 
ment. This diversity could have been 
extremely advantagious to English 
majors because many were not sure 
what they wanted to do once they 
graduated. Because the require- 
ments were not as structured, stu- 
dents majoring in English could 
obtain a well-rounded liberal arts ed- 
ucation. 

Professor Wilson had seen subtle as 
well as obvious changes within the 
university. The most obvious being the 
exposure the university had recieved 
greatly due to the sports program. BC 
had come into the limelight. Perhaps 
the most significant change he 
noticed could be seen after closer 
analysis of the student body. Students 
were no longer the stereotypical iow- 
er middle class commuters. Boston 
College had much broader horizons. 

On the whole, Professor Wilson saw 
many advantages to being a student 
here. The student body was diverse 
which adds depth. People were ex- 
ceptionally friendly. And because of 
its connection to Boston, it was an 
especially rich environment for those 
interested in American Studies. 

— Roberta Blaz 



Academics / 245 



Peter Kreeft 



Peter Kreeft ('"that's Kreeft as in Bee- 
thoven") has been with Boston College 
since 1965. Since that time, his reputa- 
tion as a professor with new angles on 
old subjects, has earned him the 
respect not only of his students, but of his 
peers as well. 

Before joining the faculty at Boston 
College, Kreeft graduated from Calvin 
College in 1959 with a degree in Philoso- 
phy. At Fordham, he received a mas- 
ter's degree in 1961 and his doctorate in 
1965. 

He was a man with many ideas about 
the various subject matter he discussed. 
Always entertaining and frequently 
amusing, he at times surprised himself to 
discover an irony previously gone un- 
noticed. Here he would stop, reflect on 
the new discovery, smile, and move on. 
Not strictly a professor, Kreeft has tried 
his hand at writing more than a few 
times. In 1976 his first book Love is 
Stronger than Death which deals with 
the five faces of death — enemy, friend, 
lover, mother, and stranger. Another re- 
lated issue, namely heaven, is a fre- 
quent topic in Kreeft's books as illus- 
trated by Heaven, The Heart's 
Deepest Longing [1980], Everything 
You Ever Wanted to Know About 
Heaven, But Never Dreamed of 
Asking (1982) and Between Heaven 
and Hell (1982). This last book, by far his 
most popular and successful work, is 
presented in conversation form with C.S. 
Lewis, John F. Kennedy and Aldous Hux- 
ley making up the cast of characters. 
These three great men become en- 
gaged in a conversation about the 
identity of Jesus while waiting "between 
heaven and hell." This book in wonder- 
fully satyrical as well as thought provok- 
ing. The following two works make great 
use of one of Keeft's most admired phi- 
losophers, Socrates. In The Unaborted 
Socrates (1 983) , the subject of abortion 
is discussed while the values are the 
topic in his latest The Best Things in Life 
(1984). Constantly on the go, you may 
see him walking swiftly through the dust- 
bowl on his way to his next lecture, off to 
teach students what he often learns 
through writing. Being a major factor in 
his life, he has other writing projects cur- 
rently in the planning stages which are 
sure to be both intriguing and stimu- 
lating. 

As an associate professor here at Bos- 
ton College for many years, Peter Kreeft 
has made a very real impact on many 
students' lives, both spiritually and intel- 
lectually. Having Peen a student of his in 
more than one course, I can testify to this 
and thank him for his invaluaPle insight 
into many of the complexities which 
confront our daily lives. 

— Sue Spence 




Peter Klidaras 



246 / Academics 



Richard Hughes 




Peter Klidaras 



The smoke from his pipe would often 
filltheairoutsideCarney 459 creat i ng a 
most distinguishable aroma. For those 
passing by, for those returning a second 
or third time, the scent was more than 
just a signal. Indeed, it was a kind of 
invitation, a welcoming to a world few 
visit, a world filled with old men and old 
women, fresh roses and broken hearts, a 
world unconscious to many but very 
conscious to one man. 

Yes, Prof. Hughes was in his office. 
Resting in his favorite arm chair, he sat 
still staring into a puff of white smoke 
produced by a small wooden pipe. In 
his lap lay a book creased open with 
the title The Rainbow by D.H. Law- 
rence. It is a book he has read from cover 
to cover many times by an author he has 
studied and identified with for many 
years. Sharing Lawrence's view with in- 
tense passion, Hughes sits thinking 
about ideas few attempt to understand 
— ideas which are best described as 
those one not just learns but feels. One 
can sense this approach by being in his 
classroom. But to even begin to com- 
prehend it, one must get to know 
Hughes, that is, become friends with the 
man. 

Why does Hughes regard Lawrence's 
work with such high esteem? Perhaps 
both men share a similar outlook. Law- 
rence once spoke of an emotion essen- 
tial to life and relationships. Many like to 
call this emotion love, but for Lawrence 
it was destined to remain unnamed. 
Perhaps it is this mystery that disturbs 
Hughes and drives him to explore a new 
understanding of the word through the 
unconscious mind. Nevertheless one 
need only be in the same room with the 
man to sense a rare quality in him. Unfor- 
tunately, there is no English word to de- 
scribe this attribute. There is, however, 
an old Greek word that comes close. It is 
called agape. Agape is love in action, 
that is, a love for what you are doing. This 
attribute strongly reflects Hughes' overall 
character, and it is something his stu- 
dents have sensed for a long time. 

Hanging on one of the walls in his 
office is a large abstract painting. It is a 
piece of art composed by many hands 
and by many minds. It was made for him 
by a group of his students. In a strange 
way, it is symbolic of the collective effort 
of all his pupils, an effort which Prof. 
Hughes inspired by his teachings in the 
classroom. Like him, it is very colorful 
and very alive. 

— Peter Klidaras 



Academics / 247 



O'Neill Library 



The wind swept through the plaza of 
O'Neill Library on October 14 with a 
sharp biting edge. But the bitter weather 
could not quelch the rising warmth that 
grew among the 1,500 person crowd 
gathered on the steps for the library 
dedication ceremonies. 

With all the pomp and circumstance 
required for such a ceremony, the pro- 
cession from Gasson tower began. A 
group of student leaders led the aca- 
demic procession of deans, faculty, 
and trustees. With the 1984 political 
campaigns at a high point, the crowd 
sparkled with prominent political figures 
like John Kerry. But there was no cam- 
paigning today. Today had been set 
aside to honor Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr., BC 
'36, Speaker of the House of Repre- 
sentatives, husband, father and grand- 
father. Speakers President J. Donald 
Monan, SJ; Prof. Albert Duhamel (En- 
glish); Ernest Boyer, president of the Car- 
negie Foundation for the Advancement 
of Teaching, and Thomas O'Connell, 
University librarian honored O'Neill, the 
new library and the Jesuit tradition of 
excellence in education. Although 
there were some people who joked that 
the library should perhaps be named 
after the 1985 Heisman trophy winner, 
Doug Flutie, it was clear that the library 
had been properly named as Speaker 
O'Neill concluded his speech. 

"I have declined many offers to name 
buildings after me, Quite honestly, I do 
not believe in naming them after public 
officials who are still in office. But this 
time I made an exception because this 
college has meant so much to me, to 
my family and to my community. I am 
proud of its past and I am proud to play 
a part in its future. I am particularly 
grateful that all of you came here today 
to join in this memorable dedication. 
Thank you and God bless you." 




Makis latridis 



248 / Academics 



A New Beginning 




Academics / 249 



Foreign Studies 




Makis latridis 



250 / Academics 





Spending a semester abroad was 
probably one of the best moves I could 
have made during my college career. 
Of course that didn't go for everyone but 
for an English major to be let loose in the 
streets of London, England, it was close 
to heaven. 

Life wasn't always bliss because, 
quite naturally, there were cultural 
adaptations to make. For example, one 
had to adjust to the British accent and 
often 
times it 
seemed 
as if they 
were 
speaking 
in a com- 
pletely dif- 
fer e n t 
tongue. 
Also, al- 
though 
the stu- 
dents 
seemed a 
little un- 
friendly at 
first, after 
a few pints 
of ale at 
the univer- 
sity pub, 
everyone 
warmed 
up a bit. 

Yes, Brit- 
ish people 
drank tea. 
A lot. But 
they drank 
coffee 
too. (Sur- 
prise?) It 
was very 
social and 
polite to 
offer a visi- 
tor a cup 
of tea or 
coffee. 

Yes, we LiseGirard 

did that here in America too but if I were 
to go over and visit the guys next door to 
my Hillside apartment I don't think they 
would have asked be if I wanted to 
have tea. In fact, the first time I was at a 
friend's apartment in London and he 
asked me if I wanted to have a cup with 
him, I laughed in his face. It seemed so, 
well, so adultlike! 

Talk about politically aware. My 
American buddies and I had a hard 
time keeping up with the Brit's well in- 




formed barbs against our political ac- 
tivities. Frantically, we searched the 
headlines of The Times and The 
Guardian and whatever other news- 
paper we could get a hold of just so we 
could mutter some sort of intelligent re- 
ply to their well directed questions. 

Although the continuous periods of 
cloudy, damp days could put one in 
moods of depression, a jog out in Hyde 
Park could always lift one's spirits. Or 

a jaunt 
down Ox- 
ford Street 
or a stroll 
through 
the Na- 
tional Gal- 
lery on a 
rainy day 
made one 
realize 
that Lon- 
don was a 
city filled 
with eye- 
opening 
Culture. It 
wasn't en- 
dowed 
with all the 
comforts 
of home 
but it cer- 
tainly was 
a very rich 
learning 
e x p e r i- 
ence. 

I'll never 
forget my 
return from 
my seven 
week 
spring 
vacation 
that was 
spent 
travelling 
in Europe. 
Having 
spent the 
last three weeks speaking only German I 
was a little confused about languages. 
So when I handed the British Officer my 
passport I asked him, in clear German, if 
he spoke English. He looked at me 
strangely, stared at the American seal 
on my passport, looked at my suddenly 
embarrassed expression, (I had realized 
my space maneuver), and laughed. 
"Yes love," he replied, "Welcome 
back." What a guy. What a country! 
— Tania Zielinski 



Academics / 251 



Joseph Levine 



One could clearly see that Joseph S. 
Levine was wholly engrossed in his pro- 
fession. An assistant professor of Biology 
who graduated from Tufts and con- 
tinued his studies at Boston University 
and Harvard, Levine was involved in 
many writing and teaching projects out- 
side his work at BC. However, his home 
remained on the Chestnut Hill campus 
and Levine was very pleased that he 
took up residence here. 

During the pastten years, five of which 
were spent at BC, Levine had been con- 
ducting his major, independent study 
on the function and evolution of color 
vision in animals. Levine's research, pre- 
sented through his writings in both books 
and periodicals (including Scientific 
American), provided the scientific 
world with information concerning 
animal's vision while also leading to in- 
novations in human vision. Levine stated 
that his findings concerning color had 
much to do with "how organisms in- 
teract with other organisms," leading to 
findings regarding color blindness as 
well as color communication when mat- 
ing in animals. 

Teaching at BC had been a good 
experience for Levine. He discovered 
that bright people were often unin- 
formed on biological issues at BC. 
Levine felt, "that an awful lot (of students) 
have their hearts in the right places." 
Also, at Boston College, Levine saw stu- 
dents to be individuals who would play 
a great part in the future. This was due to 
the fact that they, most probably, would 
be well off, well educated and voting. 
Therefore, Levine wished to inform his 
students of what needed to be done 
concerning environmental issues. In the 
future, great expense and difficulty 
would be spent in correcting mistakes 
that had been made. Students must be 
aware of these events so that they could 
make educated decisions concerning 
future questions. 

Accompanying his wish to increase 
awareness of environmental issues, 
Levine also desired that students realize 
that "learning is not a process of memor- 
izing." Instead it involved assimilating 
and digesting the material that one was 
fed and putting this information into 
practice. Levine found that the best stu- 
dents were those genuinely interested in 
the information they were studying and 
also intrigued with continuing investiga- 
tion of the subject, 

— Amy Seigenthaler 
252 / Academics 




Makis latridis 



John Heineman 




Makis latridis 



On a wall in professor John Heine- 
man's office, in a glass frame con- 
structed by his father, was a German 
passport dated September 5, 1848 
along with German identification pa- 
pers. They belonged to his great- 
grandfather, George Heineman, the first 
Heineman to come to America. 

It was Heineman's ancestry that initi- 
ated his interest in German history — an 
interest he had intensely pursued for 
twenty-three years as a history teacher 
at Boston College. 

"It wasn't until my junior year at Notre 
Dame when I was left $500 by my aunt 
that I decided to visit Germany," said 
Heineman. In 1958, his senior year at 
Notre Dame, Heineman wrote an honors 
thesis on "The German Army in 1919" 
which gained him a Gulbright scholar- 
ship to the University of Berlin where he 
studied German for the first time. 

Now, in his office in Carney 173, amid 
a vast profusion of haphazardly strewn 
papers and some 500 books with well- 
worn pages, the former chairman of the 
history department (1970-76) spoke 
about his course entitled, "Hitler and the 
Third Reich". "I had been the beneficia- 
ry of a broad interest in this subject. It 
was a fantastic atmosphere to teach in 
since students were not easily intimi- 
dated and were constantly challenging 
my conclusions and assumptions," said 
Heineman. 

Professor Heineman was the author of 
Freiher Von Neurath, subtitled "Hitler's 
First Foreign Mininster" by Heineman's 
publisher who deemed it necessary to 
put Hitler into the title. 

Last summer, Heineman took 38 stu- 
dents, primarily from BC, on a tour of 
Germany that he described as "two 
weeks of sheer enjoyment; very stimulat- 
ing, My colleagues admired the cour- 
age I showed in taking on 38 students," 
he mused. 

"Professor Heineman demonstrates a 
tremendous amount of enthusiasm for 
what he teaches. He gets involved and 
would go out of his way for people," 
said Joseph Schwegman, 1985, one of 
the students who joined Heineman on 
the tour of Germany. 

"Germans don't throw anything away. 
Just look at this office," Heineman joked 
referring to the clutter. But in a real sense 
perhaps he was referring to the history of 
the German people. 

— Thomas Zambito 

Academics / 253 



Ronald Tacelli, SJ 



According to Ronald Tacelli, SJ, 37, 
one of the youngest Jesuits at BC, "Stu- 
dents have more of a hunger for truth 
and are more open-minded now," than 
his 1969 BC graduating class. 

"We were idealists during the '60's, 
myself included, but we did one thing 
wrong — we were too close-minded," 
said the dark curly-haired Tacelli, "Our 
opinions were hardened into absolute 
truths. Now, I see students who are not 
cynical and are genuniely searching to 
know the real truth," 

Ordained in 1982 84-85 was Father 
Tacelli's first year as a full-time assistant 
professor of Philosophy. "It's a lot bigger 
place than I left, and a lot busier," said 
Tacelli of his return to BC after spending 
four years at the University of Toronto 
working on his masters and PhD. in phi- 
losophy and one year on a research 
fellowship at Oxford University. 

In his office in Carney 223, some 250 
books were neatly arranged of which 
included copies of Frank Sheed's, What 
Difference Does Jesus Make?, Rous- 
seau's Social Contract and a Boston 
Globe Sunday Magazine article enti- 
tled, "Mind, Body and Medicine". 

In the spring of 1985, Fr. Tacelli was 
teaching four corses including one on 
Emmanuel Kant and another on Thomas 
Aquinas. He also had developed a 
course devoted to his main field of inter- 
est entitled, "The Mind and its Body". 

"My interest in this area is in response 
to the writings of contemporary scientists 
which denied the existence of any non- 
material element in human beings," 
said the often pensive Tacelli as he rub- 
bed his right palm across his forehead, 
"There are substantial elements in a per- 
son that cannot be reduced to matter — 
those that effect our ability to know and 
to choose." 

Describing the extent of the Jesuit in- 
fluence on the BC campus today, Fr. 
Tacelli said, "There is less of a corporate 
Jesuit influence here simply because of 
sheer numbers. There are not many 
Jesuits. Now, the influence is more on an 
individual basis." 

It was on April 22, 1969 during his se- 
nior year at BC that Fr. Tacelli was struck 
by the idea that he should be a priest. "If 
not," he said, "I would not have been 
satisfied." 

In this third year as a Jesuit, Fr. Tacelli 
hoped that the drop in ordinations to the 
priesthood "is not because of a lack of 
response to vocation. I hope that peo- 
ple are not denying their calling. 
The world will be lessened by their 
participation." 

— Thomas Zambito '85 

254 / Academics 




Makis latridis 



Amanda Houston 




"My physician says God gave me 
bad knees because he was deliberate 
trying to slow me down," Amanda Hous- 
ton laughed. That attempt it seems was 
a futile one. Houston, chairperson of the 
Black Studies Department relaxed in her 
chair on a sunny afternoon in February 
discussing the similarities of the African 
and Irish cultures. 

"There is a commonality to the 
oppression of the black and the Irish. We 
were both oppressed by the British," 
Houston explains. Houston sees other 
similarities in black and Irish history also. 
"The Jews tend to seek power through 
commerce. The black and the Irish seek 
it through municipalities, through poli- 
tics." 

Houston is a graduate of Northeastern 
University. She completed her graduate 
studies at Harvard. As she sat in her 
Lyon's third floor office overlooking the 
quad she considered the role that BC 
played in Black Studies. Houston was 
impressed by the support the program 
received from the administration. 

"Harvard is known for its study of Afri- 
can culture," Houston says. "BC is noted 
for its study of African culture and na- 
tional black culture. But no college has 
specialized in local culture, white or 
black. BC is moving into that vacuum." 

Houston, former Assistant Director of 
Admissions at Harvard had been at Bos- 
ton College for five years in 1985. She 
taught Perspectives on Black women in 
America, American Labor and the 
Black Worker, Organized Labor, and 
Issues of Civil Rights. As the mother of 
two, Houston was concerned by the 
arrest of Harlan Jones a Boston University 
student. Jones was arrested by BC cam- 
pus police for "being a disorderly per- 
son" when he helped BC sophomore 
Denise Paquin unfurl a banner reading, 
"Paying $7,500 to an ultraconservative 
multimillionaire is a social injustice," dur- 
ing a speech by William Buckley. Pa- 
quin was not arrested. 

"Never, in my wildest dreams," said 
Houston, "did I imagine that this could 
happen at BC in 1984. It shocked the 
local black community. It shocked Har- 
lan. As middle class blacks our children 
were not raised with the awareness that 
there are still people, in pockets out 
there that would treat blacks like that. 

"I look back at the 60's and wonder, 
What did we go through it for? The 
struggle for freedom is never won. It has 
to be fought for, constantly. And it is not 
over. It is not over yet." 

— Geri Murphy 




BOSTON COLLEGE 

CHESTNUT HILL, MASSACHUSETTS 02167 



OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 



Members of the Class of 1985: 

Your four years of undergraduate life have been among the most exhilirating in the history of Boston College. 
Each of you will fashion from the marvelous experiences you have shared, memories that will serve as new bonds 
between you. The College you leave will cherish in its memory and in its way of life, accomplishments you witnessed 
at first hand. 

Perhaps the excitement of your Bowl years will one day be repeated. Certainly the effect of the O'Neill Library, that 
you were first to enter, will increasingly transform for all who come after you, what it means to be a student at 
Boston College. It is fitting that your senior year is christened the Year of the Library — our celebration of heritage 
and promise. 

From graduation forward, you now are, in your persons, the heritage and the promise of Boston College. It is a 
heritage you have enriched immeasurably during student years and a promise you will fulfill, in ways modest and 
dramatic, into the next century. 

May God richly bless you and all those who will be your loved ones in the years ahead. 



Sincerely, 

/ 



J. Donald Monan/ S.J. 
President 



256 / Academics 



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Makis latridis 



Academics / 257 



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Makis latridis 

258 / Academics 




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Makis latridis 



)eirdre Reidy 



THOMAS R O'NEILL, JR 



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Makis latridis 
262 / Seniors 




* 



Andy Ryan 



Makis latndis 



Seniors / 263 




Faces of the Class of '85 




Staff photo 

264 /Seniors 



Sequence by Peter Klidoras 



An Exceptional Class 



AnoAauoTe r | 




Peter Klidaras 



Corine Michaels 



Seniors / 265 



PAUL ABBONDANZA 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



VICTOR J. ABBOUD 

School of Management 

BS Finance 

Computer Science 



UNAF.ABDELMAJEED 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 



ELLEN ABDOW 
School of Education 
AB Special Education 



JOHN K. ABELY 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 




ROBERTO B. ABEYTA 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Philosophy 



VALERIE J. ABLAZA 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 



LAURA J. ACOSTA 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



DAVID M. ADAMS 


PETER K.ADGATE 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


BS Finance 


AB Spanish 


Economics 


Economics 




CRAIG I ADLER 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



ARMANDO A. AGUILAR 

School of Management 

BS General Management 



MADELEINE J. AGUILO 
Arts & Sciences 
BS Psychology 



MARGARET M. AHEARN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB French 



STEPHEN J. AHEARN 

School of Management 

BS Finance 




JUDITH A. AHERN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 



MAUREEN L. AHERN 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



HENRY C.AHN 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



JOSEPH F. AILINGER 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



PAMELA E. ALBINO 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Mathematics 

Computer Science 



266 / Seniors 




Mary Leonard 



An Hour at Tip's Place 



The Dustbowl will always hold a fond 
place in the BC student's heart. In the early 
days of the fall semester when no one could 
convince themselves that another year of 
school had actually begun, groups of stu- 
dents would meet on the grassy lawn to re- 
lax in the sunshine and share some stories of 
summer adventures. However with the be- 
ginning of the 1984-85 year, students were 
faced with yet another place where social 
interaction Just seemed like the natural 
thing to do (as opposed to studying of 
course). Ironically, this new "social area" 
was conveniently situated in front of the 
brand new BC library. 

Before long, The Thomas P. O'Neill library 
had established itself as a mecca of social 
activity. An hour spent there in the morning 
resulted in an hour of seeing everyone you 
knew either walking left or right across the 
library terrace. 

"Tip's Place", as it was fondly referred to, 
was the newest building on the Heights in 
1984-85. In between such gothic greats 
such as Devlin Hall and Saint Mary's it 
looked a little out of place at first. However, 
once you grew accustomed to its modem 
design you appreciated the old traditions 
of Boston College College that were sur- 
rounding a building which was likely to es- 
tablish some new traditions of its own. 

The architect that designed "Tip's Place" 
wasn't intending on having his structurally 
significant parts used for such insignificant 
behavior. The pillars in the front of the li- 
brary, which were designed so they would 



face McElroy and make the library a part of 
middle campus, were used for leaning 
against to do one or more of the three S's: 
study, sunbathe or snooze. The benches on 
the terrace were also used for these things, 
but they were mostly used as an integral 
part of the all-American pasttime of "peo- 
ple watching". 

This place was great for social activity 
because when you stood on the top step, 
everyone that walked by was so easy to 
see. It became the place to meet someone 
on the way to lunch or on the way back up 
or down to the dorm. On a warm Indian 
summer day, it was hard to believe that all 
the students sprawled across the benches 
didn't have ten-o-clock classes to attend. 
Spirits were high and conversations 
abounded. 

This warm scene appeared to be endless 
but when the January winds started blow- 
ing across those brick walkways, students 
made their route across as fast as possible. 
There was no more leaning against the pil- 
lars and no more "people watching". In- 
stead, there were the quick meetings inside 
the foyer of the library. 

However, as soon as those first rays of sun- 
shine appeared on the bricks in the spring, 
BC'ers were anxious to get themselves back 
outside of "Tip's Place" and to return to the 
sunny activity after a long winter of hiberna- 
tion. 

— Susan Towey 




LAUREN E.ALEMIAN 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



CHERYL ALESSI 

School of Education 

AB Elementary Education 




BETTIE T. ALEXANDER 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



MONICA ALLEGRI 
Arts & Sciences 
BS Psychology 




SARAH E. ALLEY 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



CHRISTINE T.ALOIA 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 




ELENA M. ALONSO 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



MARK A. AMALFITANO 
Arts 8(. Sciences 
AB Mathematics 



PAULINA M. AMARAL 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 



KAREN E. AMBROSE 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



LISA M^AMBROSE 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Mathematics 



Seniors / 267 



THOMAS AMBROSIO 


THOMAS C.AMORE 


CARL A. ANDERSON 


CHRISTINE S. ANDERSON 


JEAN E. ANDERSON 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


AB Economics 


AB Political Science 


AB Political Science 


AB Political Science 


BS Biology 


Philosophy 












JANIAANDREOTTI 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Psychology 

Speech Communication 



MICHAEL L. ANDRESINO 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



PAUL B. ANDREWS 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



KAREN A. ANIELLO 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



TERENCE ANKNER 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 




LISA M. ANTHONY 


MICHAEL J. ANTONELLO 


DOUGLAS J. APICELLA 


REINALDO R. APONTE 


JUDITH A. APPLEFORD 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


AB Economics 


AB Economics 


ES Computer Science 


BS Biology 


AB Human Development 





ANN E. ARCHAMBAULT 

School of Education 
AB Elementary Education 



STEVEN A. ARCHER 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 

Philosophy 



MARKJ.ARDUINO 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



SHARON L. AREIAS 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 



SUZANNE M. ARENA 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



268 / Seniors 



Deirdre Reidy 



Shades 



It used to be that sunglasses were simply 
an instrument for blocking the sun, But in the 
80s, they weren't just worn on sunny days, 
They were worn when there was eight inch- 
es of snow on the ground to block the snow 
blindness. They were worn on rainy days, 
cloudy days and hazy days. They were 
worn to parties, semiformals and the Rat. 
Like many other things their main function 
seemed to have gotten lost in the shuffle. 
They were an accessory, a part of your 
wardrobe. 

"Shades" said a lot about your personal- 
ity. There was the "stud" with his black way- 
farers made popular by Jake, Elwood and 
Tom Cruise; the voluptuous blonde with the 
great tan and bright yellow rims (to accen- 
tuate the tan— as if it needed it!!); the nerdy 
freshman with his clip-ons attached to his 
bi-focals; the girl with the red shades 
propped on her head who seemed to be 
saying, "I don't care what they look like on 



my face as long as they look good on my 
head"; the girl with her flouresent green 
shades that matched her flouresent green 
socks. . .a slave to fashion; the guy with the 
mirrored shades . . . you could never tell 
where his eyes were wandering. Shades 
were funny things. They seemed to create 
whole personality around a person. When 
shades were worn personalities could shift 
from wimp to hard guy, drip to intellectual, 
off the wall to laid back, Some of the BC 
students were avid collectors of shades. 
They had every color and variety that could 
be imagined, big ones, little ones, grey 
ones, blue ones. Others couldn't keep their 
hands on a pair of sun glasses for more than 
24 hours if you paid them to. They would buy 
them at noon and lose them at six. Then 1hey 
would buy another pair and promptly sit on 
them. No matter what kind or color, shades 
were a glaring reflection of your personality. 



LILY M. ARGILAGOS 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



ANTONIO A. ARIAS 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 




MICHAEL E. ARMAO 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Economics 



JEFFREY ARMENTI 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 




CHRISTINE M. ARMSTRONG 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Romance Language 

Spanish 



ELLEN H. ARMSTRONG 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



MARGARET M. ARMSTRONG 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



CHRISTOPHER J. ARNOLD 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 



LAUREEN A. ARRIGONI 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 




CARLOS H.ARTETA 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



PATRICIA J. ATKINS 

School of Education 

AB Elem-Special Education 



RICHARD N. AUDET 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Chemistry 



SUZANNE AVENA 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



FLOR AVILA-VIVAS 
School of Management 
BS General Management 



Seniors / 269 







TAMMY L. BACKHOLM 

School of Education 

AB Elem-Special Education 



BARBARA A. BADINO 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 



MARTHA R. BAGLEY 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 



KAREN BAIERLEIN 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Mathematics 



MARIA T.BALLESTER 

School of Management 

BS Finance 




LAURIE J. BANCROFT 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



ALISON J. BANE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 



JULIE C. BANE 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



DIANE L. BANEY 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



TIMOTHY W. BANNON 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



270 / Seniors 



MARKW.BAPTISTE 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 



PATRICIA R. BARANELLO 
School of Management 
BS Organizational Studies 



JOHN BARATTA 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 



LATONIA BARCLAY 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



MARK M. BARDWELL 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Sociology 




MICHELE M. BARILLO 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



PAUL D. BARKER 

Arts & Sciences 

BS English 

Sociology 



CARRIE S. BARR 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



MONIKA A. BARRERO 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 

Spanish 



WILLIAM M. BARRES 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 




RAFAEL E. BARRETO 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 

French 



MICHAELENE M. BARRETT 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 



PHILIP M. BARRETT 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 



KEVIN P. BARRY 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Physics 

Pre-Medical 



LYNNE A. BARRY 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 




STEVEN M. BARRY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Mathematics 

Economics 



LAUREN J. BASKIN 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



BETTINA BASSI 

School of Education 

AB Elem-Special Education 



TAMMY J. BATESON 

School of Education 

AB Severe Spec. Needs 



CHARLES P. BATTAGLIA 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Economics 

Political Science 



Seniors / 271 




She was 
the one you 
went to din- 
ner at Stuart 
with for the 
first time. He 
was the one 
who set you 
up with the 
gorgeous blonde for Screw Your Roommate. She 
was the one who called from work when she was 
bored. He was the guy you went home with over 
breaks because you couldn't go home. 

These were your roommates. During college, 
they played a very important role in your lives. 
Whether you lived with the same one for all four 
years or whether you had a different one each 
year, they knew you in a unique way. They knew 
how you handled pressure. They could tell when 
you needed to talk and when you wanted to be 
left alone. And, they knew how bad you looked in 
the moming, 

It was a special relationship. She wasn't your 
sister and he wasn't your brother so you didn't feel 
as free to take the same liberties that you might 
with a sibling. It was a relationship that required 
much give and take. It taught most of us a valu- 
able lesson in compromise. After all, in many 
cases you were just two people thrown together 
by fate from different corners of the world or just 
different parts of the east coast. 

Who could forget all those, "Wake me up when 
you get out of the showerl", notes you found on the 
bathroom sink. Or all those times she dragged you 
all over Boston looking for the "right" dress. Or all 
the times he stumbled in at 3:00 a.m. just as you'd 
fallen asleep (crashing into the garbage can that 
had been in the same spot all year). Or all the 
times she took you to breakfast because you 
couldn't find your points. Or all the times he said 
"Don't worry about It. I'll spot you a ten," Or all the 
Sundays you spent together . . . making repairs 
from the party the night before, Or all the afternoon 
hoop-games at the plex. Or all the times she bor- 
rowed your red sweater. Or all the times you came 
home from a long night of studying to the wel- 
comed greeting of "We've been waiting for you 
. . , let's go to M.A.'s for awhile." 

Through it all, they weren't just your roommates, they 
were your friends, too. And, what would you have 
done without them? Who else could put up with your 
crazy quirks and bad habits? Whether you were like 
day and night or two of a kind, just tie word "room- 
mates" gave connotations of a unique relationship. 
Ah, yes, we remember it well . . . 

— BertaBIaz 



Buddies, Chums and 
T 



Pals 



_ 




Mary Leonard 




RICHARD E. BATTEN 

School of Management 

BS General Management 



KEVIN P. BEAM 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 

Economics 



MARY E. BEATTIE 

School of Management 

BS Human Resources 



GWYNNE L BEATTY 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



MICHELE C. BEAUDOIN 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 



272 / Seniors 



KELLEYA.BEAUDRY 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



CONSTANCE O. BEBIS 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 



FRANCES L. BEECY 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



DOROTHY M. BEKE 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



JAMES R. BELANGER 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 




JOHN F. BELLANTONIO 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Mathematics 

Computer Science 



MARIA-LUISA BELMAR 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



PETER H. BELTRAN 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Economics 



LAURA A. BENCH 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



CATHERINE L. BENEDICT 

School of Management 

BS Organizational Studies 

Computer Science 




ELIZABETH A. BENHAM 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 

Accounting 



ANTHONY P. BENJAMIN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Psychology 

Pre-Medical 



NANCY R. BENVENT 

School of Education 

AB Elementary Education 



BRENNAJ.BERETTA 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



SUSAN G. BERG 

School of Education 

AB Human Development 




GRACE A. BERGDAHL 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



LISA M. BERMINGHAM 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



THERESA M. BERNARD 

School of Education 

AB Human Development 



KELLY A. BESSETTE 

School of Education 

AB Elem-Special Education 



SHARON M. BESSETTE 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 



Seniors / 273 




LESLIE M. BEST 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



IU!«J 



JOHN D. BIRKMEYER 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Mathematics 

Pre-Medical 





PATRICIA BEST 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



MARY F. BEVELOCK 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



CATHERINE G. BEYER 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



CYNTHIA L. BICK 

School of Education 

AB Elementary Education 

Mathematics 




MARY S.G. BICKI 


BARRY T.BICKLEY 


DAVID G. BILLO 


ELIZABETH BILODEAU 


ELIZABETH E. BINELL 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


AB Political Science 


BS Chemistry 


BS Geology 


AB English 


AB Economics 


Economics 












JOHN V. BISSONNETTE 

School of Education 

AB Elementary Education 



CAROLINE BLACKBURN 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Studio Art and History 



EMILIE ANN BLAIS 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



MARY-JO BLAND 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 




LAURIE K. BLAUVELT 

School of Management 

BS Finance 

Computer Science 



LISA BLEIER 


CAROL A. BLOOD 


JOHN V. BOLOGNA 


DAVID B. BOLUSKY 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Nursing 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


AB Speech Communication 


BS Nursing 


AB English 


BS Accounting 



274 / Seniors 





IttkU.* 



MARY ANN BORMAN 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



STEVEN J. BORNSTEIN 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 

Accounting 




MICHAEL A. BOVA 

School of Education 

AB Elem-Special Education 



CATHERINE BOYLE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communications 




JACQUELINE BOYLE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



JOHN J. BOYLE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 

Philosophy 




SHARON A. BOYLE 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 



KAREN M. BRACK 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



LAURIE E. BOSCO 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



GEORGE L. BOUDREAU 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



JOSEPH D. BOUVIER 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 

Chemistry 




Andy Ryan 

Reach out and touch someone . 



. . . ring . . . ring 

"Hello?" 

Five girls looked up from their books anx- 
iously. 

"Yes. Hold on, please. Cheryl it's for you." 

Cheryl jumps up . . . "Hello? HI!!!", she 
spueals excitedly while the heads of her five 
roommates drop back down to their books. 

What was more pleasing than answering 
the phone and hearing the voice of a 
hometown friend on the other end of the 
line? It was a feeling right up there with 
smelling Mom's cooking as you walked in 
the door, or running into an old friend at a 
hometown hangout. But somehow, phone 
calls were more endearing. Although the 
miles separating you from home seemed 
endless, the voice of an old friend could 
temporarily bridge the distance. 

"So, what's up?" 

"Oh, not muchl I talked to Lisa last week. 
She wants to tranfer to UNH so she'll be 
road-tripping soon. I'm psyched to go into 
Boston with her. Andrew called a while 
back. Soccer is going well but he's still look- 
ing for the perfect woman. Got a letter from 
Lynn. She and Doug are the epitome of the 
"happy newlyweds". She mentioned that 
Debbie and Andy are still going out . . . 
some things never change. Got a letter from 
Robyn. Eric was here when we played 
Army. He was starting. He asked about you, I 
knew that would make you happy. Haven't 
heard much from Glen. We keep missing 
each others' phone calls. Meg has an inter- 
view with IBM over Christmas break. She's 
going to be a nervous wreck so brace your- 
self. Steve got into Notre Dame's grad 



school but he's still waiting to hear from 
Georgetown. Saw Tim last week. He's hob- 
bling around on crutches because he 
broke his leg wrestling with Bob . . ." 

Memories can bring back all sorts of hor- 
ror stories that somehow linked themselves 
to that wonderful invention, the telephone. 
What about the time when your roommate 
accidentally tripped over the phone cora 
and broke her ankle? And if that wasn't 
enough, the phone broke too. That meant 
days of hearing the phone ring and not be- 
ing able to hear the person on the other 
end. Talk about frustration!!! 

Or then there was the inevitable busy sig- 
nal. It seemed that the first thing someone 
always did when they called was to com- 
plain about how long it took to get through 
to the line. Well , there was no way of getting 
past that problem because who could help 
sheer popularity?! 

The worst situation was expecting the 
phone call of the evening . . . wondering if 
he or she had forgotton to call . . . watching 
the clock in your bedroom . . . waiting for 
your roommmate to get off the phone with 
the friend from Economics class (couldn't 
they discuss this in class??) . . . waiting . . . 
impatiently waiting . . . and suddenly the 
phone rings . . . you let your roommate an- 
swer, holding your breath and listening for 
your name. 

The call was for you!!! 

(it was your sister) 

Well, it's true — it was the next best thing 
to being there. 

— Berta B. and Tania Z. 



Seniors / 275 



ELIZABETH C.BRACKEN 

School of Education 

AB Elem-Special Education 



SUSAN M. BRADLEY 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



MELISSA A. BRADY 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



LLOYD J. BRAIDER 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



SHERYL M.BRANCH 

School of Education 

AB Elem-Special Education 



LISA BRAZZAMANO 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 







MICHELEA.BREDICE 

School of Education 

AB Human Development 



ALICE E. BREDIN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



DOROTHY A. BREEN 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 



PAULA. BREEN 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Economics 







JANET BREINNER 
Arts &. Sciences 
AB Psychology 




TRACIEA. BREINER 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



Homeward Bound 



At last you were in 
the air, headed home. 
When you were study- 
ing for yourcalc final, 
you thought this mo- 
ment would never ar- 
rive. Everyone 
experienced those "I 
cannot wait to go homel" moments: having waited for the 
bus in °20 weather, opened the refrigerator to find it lacked 
all the things you craved most, or woken to the sound of a fire 
alarm at 4AM. During first semester the desire and the need 
to go home were much greater than during second semes- 
ter. How many times did you hear friends and roommates 
scream "I can't wait til Thanksgiving!" The thought of being 
home, having spent time with family and friends, helped you 
get through the weeks. Christmas break was always fun. It 
was four weeks of vegetation and catching up on the soaps. 
For some, it was four weeks of working to earn spending 
money for second semester. One tended to forget he's 
"home" . . . living under "mom and dad's roof", one had to 
conform to the rules again. What was "home" without some 
yelling from mom? If a curfew was broken, mom still sat by 
the door and worried. It was good to know that some things 
never changed, 

— Roberta Blaz 




Andy Ryan 



276 / Seniors 



EDWARD F. BRENNAN 
Arts 8t Sciences 
AB Economics 



STEPHEN C. BRENNAN 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Computer Science 



MARY E. BRESLIN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB French 



DONALD J. BREZINSKI 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 



JAMES A. BRIDEN 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 




WILLIAM P. BRITT 


MARY E. BROBSON 


GLENN P. BRODEUR 


ALISON BROOKS 


TRACY A. BROOKS 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


AB History 


AB Economics 
History 


AB English 
Philosophy 


AB Fine Arts 


AB Speech Communication 




KATHLEEN M. BROPHY 

School of Education 

AB Human Development 



KARENJ.BROSTOSKI 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Computer Science 



DAVID J. BROWN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Economics 

History 



DAVID BROWN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Studio Art 



DAVID S. BROWN 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 




DONNA J. BROWN 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



DONNAJ.BRUNET 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



NANCY A BRYANT 

School of Education 

AB Early Child-Special Ed 



SHARON F. BRYAR 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Philosophy 



ELISABETH BUCKINGHAM 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



Seniors / 277 



ALICE A. BUCKLEY 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 



PAULA M. BUEHNER 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



LINDA A. BULICH 


PAUL BURCHER 


PETER H. BURGER 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


BS Biology 


AB Philosophy 


AB Economics 


Pre-Medical 








DANIEL R. BURKE 


JULIE A. BURKE 


KATHLEEN M. BURKE 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


AB Political Science 


BS Biology 
Pre-Medical 


BS Finance 



THOMAS M. BURKE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



CHRISTOPHER D. BURNS 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Economics 

Mathematics 




FELICIA BURREY 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Theater Arts 



MICHELLE M. BYRNE 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



LISA G. CAGGIANO 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 



MAURA L. CAHALANE 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



CHRISTINE M. CAHILL 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 




RICHARD CALABRESE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Economics 

Political Science 



DAVID E. CALDERONE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Russian Studies 



ANDREAS G.CALIANOS 

Arts &. Sciences 

AB Biology 

Computer Science 



DENISE CALLAHAN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 

Philosophy 



ELLEN Y. CALLAHAN 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



278 / Seniors 







MONICA M. CALLAHAN 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



PHILIP J. CALLAHAN 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



RICHARD J. CALLAHAN 

Arts & Sciences 

BS English 



JOSEPH A. CALLANAN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



DAN C CALLAWAY 

School of Management 

BS Finance 




KATHRYN R. CALNEN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 

English 



MARY MARGARET T. 

CAMARDESE 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



MAUREEN CAMPANELLA 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



NANCY E. CAMPANELLA 

School of Education 
AB Elementary Education 



ANN T. CAMPBELL 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 

Speech Communication 




Geoff Why 



Pet Peaves 



Didn't you hate it when . . . 

. . , someone pulled your laundry out and 

threw it on a table. 

. . . you opened a full mailbox and found 

nothing for yourself. 

. . . the BayBank machine ran out of money 

on a Friday afternoon. 

. . . you lost money in a coke machine, 

. . .you went to register for the next semester 

and a class you wanted closed while you 

were in line. 

. . .your flight home was delayed. 

. . . you struggled to get out of bed for 9:00 

class only to find a "cancelled" note on the 

door. 

you had to "date by T". 

the fire alarm went off at 4:00 AM. 

you opened an empty refrigerator. 

your prof ran long on his lecture. 

there wasglops of toothpaste in the sink. 

one person wrecked the test curve by 
getting 100 when the rest of the class scored 
In the 60s. 



there was a lack of hot water. 

dirty dishes were piled high 

when it was your turn to wash them. 

you had a "last day" final, 

someone pushed the seventh floor but- 
ton when they got on at the eight floor. 
. . .the computer went down 
> . . phone messages intended for and 
highly value by you were in advertantly lost 
. . . you lost the one piece of paper with all 
the information on it for your final project (or 
the senior section of the yearbook) , a piece 
of paper which had not been let out of your 
sight for two months, until you needed it of 
course 

. . . you made your bed because your 
roommate always did and they decided 
not to bother that day 
. . . other cars cut you off 
. . .someone drove out the "Entrance" 
. . .freshman walked in front of your car with 
their heads spinning in space 



CAROLYN J. CAMPBELL 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Philosophy 



FIONA M. CAMPBELL 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 




kjw,» 



GEORGE D. CAMPBELL 
School of Management 

BS Finance 

Marketing 



CHRISTOPHERS. CANNING 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 

Philosophy 



Seniors / 279 



FRANK T.CANNONE 

School of Management 

BS Economics 



JOHN V. CANOVA 


CYNTHIA D. CANOVITCH 


PETER CAPELLA 


DEBRA F. CAPLAN 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


AB Mathematics 


BS Psychology 


BS Chemistry 


BS Marketing 




EDWARD J. CAPOBIANCO 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 
Management 



GABRIEL R. CAPPUCCI 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



CHERYL A. CAPPUCCIO 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



DEBRA R. CARDINALE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



MARY CAREW 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 




NORMAN C. CAREY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



BRIAN M. CARNAHAN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



MARIE T, CARNEY 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



MICHAEL J. CARNEY 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Mathematics 



BRIAN C.CAROME 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 




ELLEN M. CARR 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 



280 / Seniors 



ANTONIO CARRERO SALAS 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



JANE E. CARTER 

School of Education 

AB Human Development 



STEPHEN F. CARTER 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Chemistry 

Pre-Dental 



ANN M. CASAS 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 

Mathematics 







JOHN F. CASCIONE 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 



JOHN F. CASEY 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



JULIANNE S. CASEY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



MARIA E.CASIERI 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



JOSEPH J. CASTRO 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 




RENEE M. CASTRO 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



EUGENIA K. CATSAVIS 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



CYNTHIA M. CAYER 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



FRANCISCO J, CELAYA 

School of Management 

BS Economics 



LAURA J.CELLA 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



In Search of the Great Pumpkin 



Halloween, It was just one of those days that brought out 
the child In all of us much the same way that the Grinch and 
Rudolf did. Every year as those Christmas classics rolled 
around students would gatherto see Hermie the misfit elf with 
a burning desire to be a dentist or Little Cindy Lu Hoo (who 
was no more than two) who caught the Grinch in the act. By 
the same accord you would see BCers dressed up on Octo- 
ber 31 in assorted costumes, Childhood days of plastic 
masks with two eyeholes poked out and the little orange 
pumpkin for carrying treats were long gone for us. We had 
more "mature" ways of celebrating, During the grade 
school days the selection of costumes left much to be de- 
sired: Little Red Riding Hood, Snow White, Batman and 
Robin. College students made use of all their resources to 
come up with interesting get-ups. There was the doctor will- 
ing to examine any young lady and the priest hearing the 
true confessions in the corner and the ladies of the evening 
selling their wares and bums with their trusty brown paper 
bags. Given the chance every college student had their 
own creative flair. 

Perhaps one of the biggest goofs though was for BC to 
schedule parents weekend for the one traditionally reserved 
fa Halloween. Was that supposed to stop the students from 
dressing up or something? Well, who knows why they did it. 
As Linus knows there is really no standing in the way of a 
sincere Haloween and so parents weekend or no parents 
weekend the BC undergrads donned their traditionally out- 
rageous Halloween garb and invited Mom and Dad to join 
the party. 

Oh well, so much for the party. It was tough to understand 
why Mom and Dad didn't appreciate Kegs and Eggs, one of 
the finer delicacies in BC life. But since it wasn't their cup of 
tea there was no sense trying to force it down their throat, go 
outtobreakfastl 

What a fantastic idea. There was this great place right 



behind Kenmore square called the Empire Deli. They'd love 
it. 

"Eeeeeeeeekl" mother screamed as Dracula pressed his 
nose against hers. 

"I want to suck your blood. Ah, ha, ha, ha." he drooled 
cooly. 

"Eeeeeek!" 

"He's only kidding Mom, It's Halloween!" 





Deirdre Reidy 



Seniors / 281 



DONNA M. CEMPE 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



PAUL B. CERVIZZI 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



NAN C. CHADDERDON 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



NANCY CHAN 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



WALTER CHI-WAH CHAN- 

School of Management 

BS Economics 




WILFRED KAKWOK CHAN 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



LYNNE E. CHANDLER 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



PETER H. CHANG 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



ANA I CHAPMAN 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



JAMES T.CHARON 

School of Management 

BS Economics 

Finance 




The last week In Novemberwas 
a special time for BC students 
and alumni. It was a time to hold 
your head up high, swelling with 
pride. When In BC history had 
there ever been a moment or 
time in which BC felt a greater 
high? It was the week of the spec- 
tacular defeat of Miami. It was 
the week that the Cotton Bowl 
representatives invited us to Dal- 
las. It was the week Doug Flutie 
won the Heisman. But the pride 
stemmed not only from the grid- 
iron. BC had one of the highest 
application pools in the country. 
Another moment of great pride 
was felt at the library dedication. 

As we become alumni of 
BC's well go on to meet the chal- 
lenges ahead. The experiences 
have been more than just aca- 
demic. They've helped us grow 
as Individuals. 



Eagle Pride 




Andy Ryan 




SUSAN L. CHASE 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 




WAI-HING CHENG 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



282 / Seniors 



MICHELLE WAI HAN CHEUNG 

School of Management 

BSArt 

Finance 



LISA L CHIARELLO 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



JERI-LYNNE CHIASSON 

School of Education 

AB Elem-Special Education 



SOPHIA P. CHIN 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



THERESA A. CHMARA 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 

Pre-Law 




ALEXANDRA E. CHOATE 

School of Management 

BS Economics 



CHERYL A. CHRISSOS 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



MARK T. CHRISTO 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



KARYN L. CHUNG 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 

Asian Studies 



NEWTON L CHUNG 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 




ROBERT D. CIANCIULLI 

School of Management 

BS Economics 



MARGARET CINCOTTA 
Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech 
Communication 



CAROLA.CINNEY 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 



MARIACHIARACIRIELLO 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 



DIANE M. CLANCY 
Arts &. Sciences 
AB Mathematics 




KEVIN W. CLANCY 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 



CHARLES H.CLARK 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



JACQUELINE A. CLARK 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



ANN MARIE CLASBY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Sociology 



ROBERT G.CLEMENTE 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 



Seniors / 283 




ROBERT J. CLERICO 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



DINA C. CLESSAS 

School of Education 

AB Human Development 

Spanish 



ANNE M.CLIFFORD 
Arts & Sciences 
BS Psychology 



PATRICK M. CLIFFORD 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



TERESA A. CLINE 

School of Management 

BS Economics 




MARGARET M. CLOSSICK 


ANN B. COAKLEY 


BERNARD COCCIA 


JEFFREY M. COCCOLUTO 


CRAIG A. COFFEY 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Management 


School of Management 


BS Human Resource 


AB English 


BS Marketing 


BS Marketing 


BS Marketing 


Management 








Philosophy 




JOHN W. COGAN 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



CONNIE F. COLAS 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



CHRISTINE M. COLBATH 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



DIA T.COLBERT 
School of Management 
BS General Management 



KATHLEEN M. COLBERT 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 





KAIRON M. COLEMAN 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



ANN M. COLLARI 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



GINA G. COLLOPY 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Mathematics 



GISELLE M. COLON 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



ANDREA J. COLTILETTI 

School of Education 

AB Elem-Special Education 



284 / Seniors 




SLi* 



REGAN COMINS 

School of Education 

AB Severe Special Needs 



CAROL M. CONCANNON 

School of Education 
AB Human Development 



KATHLEEN E. CONCHERI 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



CHRISTOPHER F. CONFORTI 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



CAROLYN E. CONIGLIARO 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 

Marketing 




Makis latridis 



Frittering 



DIANA M. CONLEY 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



NANCY M.T. CONLEY 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



Boston College students, like other stu- 
dents had a lot of spare time. Actually, it 
wasn't spare time at all. It was time that 
should have been spent on the books. 
Many students were unsure of just exactly 
what spare time was. Many actually didn't 
think they had any. These people seemed 
to create it to fulfill the lack they thought 
they had, This was the phenomenon known 
as frittering", Basically there were two main 
classes of fritters: person-based and social- 
relations based. 

These fritters seemed much more com- 
mon than originally thought, It was difficult 
to estimate just how much time was actu- 
ally frittered away but it seemed to total a 
hefty sum by the end of one work week, 

Person-based frittering was done alone. 
By believing one will wake up after a cold 
shower or by taking a walk outside, one 
had justified to himself that these were in- 
centives to help him study. Ordering pizza 
was another great fritter. One wasted an 
Inconcievable amount of time just trying to 
track down one or two more hungry souls to 
split the cost. Once the call had been 
placed, one couldn't possibly expect to 
get any work done with visions of greasy, 
luke-warm pizza sliding down the throat. 

A lot of these ideas were simply attempts 
to combat the age-old student enemy of 
fatigue. The most famous and certainly the 
most widely used fritter was the "I'll get up 
early In the morning when I'll be able to 
work better" fritter. Some other person- 
based fritters included the "focus on your 
past achievements" or the "rest on your lau- 
rels" fritters. These occurred when people 
decided not to study for a test because 
they had done okay on the last one with a 



minimal amount of effort. But perhaps the 
most popular form of frittering was sleep. 
Anytime, anywhere. . .that was always the 
perfect time and placel The reasoning be- 
hind this was that you'd be more refreshed 
afterwards. 

The second major class of fritters was the 
social-based fritter. These employed other 
students in the actual process of avoiding 
school work. Included in these social- 
based fritters was the infamous group dis- 
cussion. This involved students getting 
together under the false pretext of studying. 
Everything from how difficult the particular 
course was to plans for the upcoming 
weekend were discussed. When studying 
was actually accomplished, the meeting 
served another purpose. It allowed a stu- 
dent the opportunity to find out how the 
others students in the class were doing and 
to compare it to their own progress, or lack 
there of. When students chose to compare 
their work with that of others, they usually 
looked for someone they knew was not as 
far advanced as they were. Now he 
wouldn't feel as guilty about frittering his 
spare time away. Even though many peo- 
ple felt that the group was rewarding, it 
really wasn't unless everyone was willing to 
work. What ended up happening many 
times was that students would start out dis- 
cussing the question or problem at hand 
and one thing would lead to another. Sud- 
denly you were discussing the Bruce 
Springteen concert. 

Frittering was an art. And no one could 
find more ways to waste time in a justifiable 
way then B.C. students. Truly masters of the 
art, 

— R.J. McMahon 




KARIN A. CONNELLY 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



SUSAN P. CONNELLY 

School of Education 

AB Elem-Special Education 




PETER M. CONNERS 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 



BRYAN P. CONNOLLY 

School of Management 

BS Economics 

Computer Science 



Seniors / 285 




A Nap ... the pause that refreshes 



Approxi- 
mately one- 
third of 
everyone's 
lite was spent 
sleeping, 
However, 
during the 
college 
years, that percentage tended to sharply decline. 
With studying, partying, eating, etc., who could 
find eight consecutive hours to devote to sleep? 
Sometimes you couldn't even sleep when you 
wanted to, taking the noise factor Into consider- 
ation, But, most resourceful Boston College stu- 
dents could find time for a nap now and then. 

Where was the best place to catch up on some 
sleep? On a nice sunny day, who could resist those 
rays calling you to the dustbowl? Why not? You 
had an hour to kill between classes. Once the 
stream of students rushing to class died down, you 
felt yourself dozing off . . . after what seemed like 
ten minutes but in reality had been forty-five, you 
woke up just in time to get to class. 

Another exciting fifty minutes in Shakespearean 
Lit. You took your coat off, pulled out the old note- 
book as the prof sat up on the table and prepared 
to lecture on the murder of Julius Caesar, Just as 
Caesar headed off to the Senate, you felt the fa- 
tigue setting in . . . yawn ... not a good sign. You 
propped the elbow in Its stategic position, rested 
your chin In your palm. , .suddenly the eyelids just 
became to heavy. You thought to yourself, "That's 
the last time I'm going to MA's after the Rati!" Your 
mind drifted off to a hundred different places. Sud- 
denly, a startling "head-drop" awoke you. "I can't 
believe I fell asleep." The prof was now talking 
about Mark Anthony's funeral oration to Caesar. 
You slept through the entire murder. "No biggy. I'll 
just go over that scene at the library." 

The "Tip". What better place to "catch some 
Z's". Those chairs were just ioo comfortable!!! You 
could walk through at any given time and see 
people sleeping with their feet propped up, their 
books in their laps and their heads resting on the 
back of the chair. Many had probably been 
sleeping for hours. 

Somehow, with a few Z's here and a few Z's 
there, students managed to accumulate a de- 
cent amount of sleep between Sunday and Thurs- 
day. Ah, all rested up . . . just in time for the 
weekend. 

— Roberta Blaz 




. -k;-v • > *V < ' . * • 



Mary Leonard 




CATHERINE P. CONNOLLY 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Speech Communication 



JOSEPH P. CONNOLLY 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



JOYCE M. CONNOLLY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 

English 



TIMOTHY J. CONNOR 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 



PAUL M. CONNORS 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



286 / Seniors 




JOHN A. CONSTANTINE 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



PAULA A. CONTRADO 

Arts & Sciences 

BS. Theology 



KEVIN P. CONVERY 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



COLLEEN P. CONWAY 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



MARK A. CONWAY 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 




ELSIE P. CONYNGHAM 

School of Education 

AB Human Development 



GEORGE H. COOLEY 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 

Finance 



JOHN F. COONEY 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 

Computer Science 



MARYCLARE COOPER 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 



STELLA M. COOPER 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 




ifcU 




TERESA A. COPPOLA 

School of Education 

AB Elem-Special Education 



JULIA M. CORBETT 


HELEN E. CORCORAN 


JOSEPH J. CORCORAN 


MICHAEL G. CORCORAN 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


AB Psychology 


AB History 


AB History 


AB English 
Speech Communication 




MARGY CORCORAN 
School of Education 

AB Secondary Education 
English 

Speech Communications 



JULIAA.CORRITORI 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



PATRICK J. CORRY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



RALPH L. CORTON 

School of Management 

BS Finance 

Economics 



JEANNE COSGROVE 

School of Education 

AB Human Development 



Seniors / 287 




PAULA A. COSTA 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 

Psychology 



MARY C. COSTANTINO 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Theology 

Philosophy 



CATHERINE A. COSTELLO 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



JOSEPH COSTELLO 

School of Management 

BS Management 



LAURENCE B. COTE 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 








KELLY A. COTTER 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



THOMAS G. COTTIERO 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



EDWARD COUDRIET 
School of Management 
BS General Management 



BRIAN J. COUGHLAN 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



CLAIRE P. COUGHLAN 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 




GUSA.COUTSOUROS 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



TIMOTHY P. COX 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



NOREEN M. CRAINE 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



DONALD F. CRAVEN 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



BETSEY L CRAWFORD 

Arts &. Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 




#0 #1 

.life] 



ROBERT D. CRESCI 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Mathematics 



RICHARD J. CRESTA 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



CAROLA.CRIMMINS 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



LISACRISTADORO 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



JOHN P. CROKE 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Economics 



288 / Seniors 




iiH/f 



'/// 




ELIZABETH E. CRONIN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



KATHLEEN M. CRONIN 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



MATTHEW H. CRONIN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 

Philosophy 



JOAN M. CROWLEY 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



KATHLEEN CUBELLS 

School of Management 

BS Finance 




KELLYJ.CUMMINGS 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



ANDREW P. CUNNINGHAM 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



JUDITH M. CUNNINGHAM 

School of Education 
AB Elem-Special Education 



JULIEA.CURCURU 

School of Education 

AB Elem-Special Education 



CLAIRE CURRAN 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 




Peter Klidaras 



Picture This 



"Sit right on the brown cushion. Okay, turn 
your body a little, move legs. Look up here 
at my hand. Moisten your lips just a little 
please." 
FLASHII 

"Turn your body right. Chin up a little, right 
there." 
FLASHII 

"Okay, smile . , . tone it down a little. Per- 
fect." 
FLASHI 

"Okay, now, look right here, straighten your 
back, Smile a little more. Great." 
FLASHI 

"Okay, just look over here, don't smile, just 
moisten your lips a little agin." 
FLASHI 

"Okay, that'll do it nicely. It'll be about two 
weeks on the proofs. They'll be mailed to 
your local address." 

Almost every senior experienced this at 



the beginning of the semester. It was two 
minutes in the life of Harold Dodge, the pho- 
tographer from Yearbook Associates. He 
graced McElroy 103, the yearbook office, 
for five weeks, Monday through Friday, 
8:30AM to 5:30PM, taking pictures of the 
close to two thousand seniors who wanted 
their picture In their yearbook. Always 
cheerful, always with a sarcastic quip to 
make someone crack a natural smile. All 
those pictures, he must have taken thou- 
sands of BC seniors over the years. A true 
pro, he always managed to position your 
head, so you couldn't see the zit on your 
forehead. He always knew how to make 
your serious shots carry an air of scholarly 
Intelligence without looking stern. And he 
always knew how to make your smile shine 
in such a way that even as the years passed 
it would still be flattering . . . forever worth a 
thousand words. 

— Roberta Biaz 



COLIN P. CURRAN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Economics 

Philosophy 



DEIRDRE CURRAN 
School of Education 

AB Spanish 
Special Education 




GREGORY P. CURRAN 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



JANICE M. CURRAN 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 

Marketing 



Seniors / 289 



DONNA A. CURRY 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 

Human Resources 



KATHLEEN M. CURTIN 


PATRICIA A. CURTIN 


PATRICK CURTIN 


ELLEN T. CUSACK 


School of Nursing 


School of Nursing 


School of Management 


School of Management 


BS Nursing 


BS Nursing 


BS Marketing 


BS Marketing 




PAULG.CUSHING 


FRANCIS CUTRUZZULA 


JOSEPH CUZZUPOLI 


SANDRA M. CYR 


WENDY M. CZERPAK 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


BS Computer Science 


BS Economics 


AB Political Science 


BS Marketing 


BS Biology 


Finance 






Computer Science 






STEPHANIE M. DACOSTA 


ANABELAG. DACRUZ 


JACK B. DADLANI 


MATTHEW T. DAGHER 


MARY MARGARET DAGOSTINO 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


BS Marketing 
Organizational Studies 


BS Sociology 


AB English 


AB Economics 


AB Computer Science 


Spanish 


Theology 




Math 








DIANE M. DAHLQUIST 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



FRANCIS E. DALEY 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



LESLIE A. DALTERIO 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



LYNN M. DALTON 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 

Film 



MAUREEN D. DALTON 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 



290 / Seniors 




Just Friends 



Boys were 
boys and 
girls were 
girls. Though 
there was 
something 
unique 
about 
spending the 
day shopping with the girls or watching a football 
game with the guys, there was also something 
special about "guy-girl" friendships. Two guys, as 
close as they might have been, didn't often have 
"deep" talks. Generally, they knew each other so 
well that anything one was feeling about girls, 
school, or just life was known but not discussed. 
Advice about everything and anything was often 
asked In a lighthearted fashion. Girls, on the other 
hand, did spend a lot of time talking. Many times it 
was trivial gossip but many hours were also spent 
on late right talks. Who can forget some of those 
3:00 A.M. — after M.A.'s chats. Some of the most 
honest talks occurred when the buzz hadn't quite 
worn off. 

Relationships between guys and girls were often 
harder to come by. Sure everyone had their pla- 
tonic friends they could eat lunch with or have a 
few laughs with during class to break the monot- 
ony, but how many opposite-sex friends could you 
stay up all night talking with? It was so different 
from same-sex friendships. You both had to pass 
v 1he stage" successfully to have a strong relation- 
ship. "The stage" being the point in the relationship 
when you both knew you were "just good friends". 
When you were just getting to know someone, of 
course you went through the period of "second 
guessing", After all, you got along great ... did 
you like him/her? Did he/she like you? The question 
stared you In the face. "No", you thought to your- 
self, "things are great the way they are." It may 
have taken a long time but once passed that 
"stage", you knew you had something great. 
Something that can only be shared between 
friends. More effort had to be put into a guy-girl 
friendship. Two guys or two girls could become 
great friends in a matter of weeks . . . common 
Interests, common views, common experiences. A 
guy and a girl had to cultivate the relationship 
more carefully. The interests and the views which 
sparked the friendship may have been the same 
but each person's experiences were often so dif- 
ferent that one helped the other gain new per- 
spectives, 

It was often a relationship built on two principles, 
the casual attitudes of guys and the openness of 
girls. It was often less demanding. You didn't have 
to go out with the guys or the girls. It wasn't based 
on a "group", It was more one-on-one. What was it 
that made you so close, yet, with no romance in- 
volved? You shared views on everything from 
world affairs to what teacher to avoid, The masks 
were taken off, the walls were brought down. And 
whether days, weeks, or months passed without 
the two of you spending time together, you could 
always pick up where you left off. 

But with all this, why not more? Would it have 
ruined It? Why risk a wonderful friendship for the 
pressure of dating? If you changed the relation- 
ship, the individuals were bound to change as 
well, Romance came and went but friendship was 
much less fragile. The ice wasn't as thin, you didn't 
need to be as cautious. While there was still the 
respect of the other's feelings, there was rarely hes- 
itation to hold opinions back. The most special 
friendships of all are those between a girl and a 
guy. They take a little more effort but are worth the 
rewards, 




Makis latrldis 



Seniors / 291 



MARGARET DALY 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



PAUL F. DALY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 



SHEILA M.DALY 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



JULIE A. DAMBRA 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 

Speech Communications 



ANNETTE C. DARDANELLO 

School of Education 
AB Elementary Education 




LINDAS. DAVERN 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



LORI A. DAVIS 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 



AMY M. DAWSON 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 



GREGORY P. DAY 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



DENISE E. DECHESSER 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 




KATHLEEN T. DEE 

School of Education 

AB Human Development 

History 



ROBIN A. DEFLUMERI 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 



LYNNE C. DEGIULIO 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



JEFFREY DEGOES 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 



IRENE M. DE GROOT 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 









DIANE E. DEGUZMAN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 

Mathematics 



JODI L. DELNICKAS 


SALVATORE A. DELUCA 


STEVEN J. DELUCA 


JOHN ANDREW DEMALIA 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


BS Finance 


BS Accounting 


AB Political Science 


BS Accounting 




Computer Science 


Economics 





292 / Seniors 



JAMES P. DEMARIA 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 

Philosophy 



PETER J. DEMARTINO 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Pre-Medical 

Biology 



ROBERTA, DEMAURO 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



LISA M. DE MEDEIROS 

Arts & Sciences 

AB French 

Spanish 



THOMAS A. DEMERS 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 




JANET M.DENEEN 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



CHRISTINE DENTREMONT 

School of Management 

BS Human Resource 

Management 



JUDY A. DEPIERRO 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 



MARCIE H. DEPLAZA 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



MARIA A. DEQUATTRO 
Arts & Sciences 
BS Psychology 



The Great Escape 



Everybody, at one time or another, experienced the tre- 
mendous pressures which ail college students faced. Exams, 
papers, roommates, jobs, AP and UPI rankings etc . . . could 
have a profound effect on most student's anxiety levels. 
However, there were also many activities which allowed 
student's to escape these pressures, even if just for a short 
time, 

Some students chose to leave the campus entirely. They 
took a weekend trip home (for Mom's home cooking and 
laundry service), a drive to the beaches of Cape Cod, or a 
scenic Jaunt to the northern mountains. These were all won- 
derful and relaxing things to do on the weekends. 

However, as students, we could be faced with pressures at 
any time of the week. In this case, we opted for a closer get- 
away. Some ventured to Faneuil Hall, while others visited 
Downtown Crossing or Harvard Square. These outings each 
offered a different means of escape such as shopping, mov- 
ies and people watching. Boston also offered great 
nightlme escapes such as the clubs of Landsdowne Street 
and Kenmore Square and exciting sporting events such as 
the Celtics, Bruins, and Red Sox. 

The local Boston College vicinity itself presented a number 
of great escapes. The Plex and the Resevoir were both great 
places to avoid the run-around, Some students chose one of 
the many other recreational activities offered by the Plex. 
These Included everything from swimming and weight lifting 
to intramural sports. Throughout the years, the organized 
team sports of B.C. offered many of us an excellent opportu- 
nity to watch fine athletes at work as well as an exciting 
diversion from the books. For those who were only athleti- 
cally inclined enough to lift a spoon to their mouth or a can to 
their lips, White Mountain Creamery and liquor or conven- 
ience stores were only a short walk or T ride away (and most 
of the pizza places delivered). 

However, when a really quick escape from everyday 



stress and strain was needed, closing the books and chat- 
ting with friends, watching IV. or listening to the radio al- 
ways worked well, 

We had many different outlets available to us to escape 
the everyday pressures of school. It was up to each one of us 
to find the most enjoyable and relaxing activity to suit our 
needs. 

— Cheryl Cappuccio 





Andy Ryan 



Seniors / 293 



NINAM.DERBA 


LYNN M, DESAUTELS 


DEBORAH A. DESIMONE 


USA A. DESMOND 


WILLIAM J. DESSEL 


School of Management 


School of Education 


School of Nursing 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


BS Computer Science 


AB Elem-Special Education 


BS Nursing 


BS Biology 


AB Economics 




MICHAEL DETORO 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History, Philosophy 



THERESA A. DETTUNG 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



BRIAN W. DEVANEY 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 

Marketing 



AIMEE M. DEVEREUX 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 

History 



EMILY A. DEWIRE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 




DEBORAH R. DICATERINO 

School of Education 
AB Elem-Special Education 




ANTHONY L. DICENSO 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 




Let It Snow, Let It Snow, Let It Snow 



At BC most people got excited 
about the first big snowfall each 
year. The campus became 
beautiful. We hoped that classes 
would be cancelled. But there is 
a duality to snow — it can be lots 
of fun or lots of problems. 

Snow Is wonderful when there Is 
no place to go. The first big snow- 
storm freshman year gave us all 
the chance to have a good time, 
On both Newton Campus and 
Upper Campus, we ran outside, 
armed ourselves with snowballs, 
and engaged in snow battles. 

That first snowfall gave us such 
a feeling of unity. The snow 
brought alot of people together 
In spontaneous fun for the first 
time In our college careers and 
foreshadowed the good times to 
come. 




Geoff Why 



294 / Seniors 



THOMAS J. DICESARE 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 



ADRIAN D. DICKSON 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 

Economics 



JAMES A. DICORPO 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Theology 

Philosophy 



ROBERT DIFRANCO 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre- Dental 



NANCY J. DILLIHUNT 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 




ELLEN DIMARTINO 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



GEORGE DIMITRIOU 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



JOHN A. DINNEEN 
Faculty 



JOSEPH G. DIPIETRO 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



MARILYN R. DIRICO 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 




LYNDAADISTEFANO 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Speech Pathology 



JAMES V.DITULLIO 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



MARKCDIVINCENZO 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 



LEONARD L DOBENS 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 



ALISON M. DOHERTY 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 




CATHERINE! DOHERTY 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



HOLLY A. DOHERTY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 

Spanish 



MARIE J. DOHERTY 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



JOHN V. DOLAN 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 

Marketing 



MARGARET M. DOLAN 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Philosophy 



Seniors / 295 




JEANNE M. DOLIVEIRA 

School of Education 

AB Elem-Speclal Education 




SOPHIE DON 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History Romance Languages 




All Night Long 



"All Nighters." They 
happen to the most or- 
ganized of us. And "all 
night long" doesn't re- 
fer to the Lionel Ritchie 
song which states 
"once you get started 
you can't slow down." 
Unfortunately, our version of "all night long" is not capable of 
generating enthusiasm. 

B.C. all nighters are those sometimes inevitable experi- 
ences when you are forced to stay up all night to meet a 
deadline ... or even an extension of a deadline. They are 
the closest students get to the dreaded "real world." They 
are a race with the clock during which the memory works , . . 
all night long. 

The reason for pulling an all nlghter Is never as bad as the 
actual event. The same work done during reasonable hours 
would only be worth complaining about. After surviving an 
all nighter, the haunting sound of "bed-time magic", the 
writer's cramp . . . anyone can drum up sympathy from any 
other student on campus. 

In order to cure yourself from "day after all nighter syn- 
drome", hand in your assignment or take your test, then 
crawl home and clamber into bed for a much deserved rest 
. . . hopefully, all night long. 

— Elizabeth Seigenthaler 




Andy Ryan 




HANLEY DONAHUE 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



KATHERINE A. DONAHUE 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



LOUISE M. DONAHUE 

School of Education 

AB Elementary Education 

Human Development 



MAUREEN C. DONAHUE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 

Philosophy 



JOHN DONES 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 




GARY P. DONLIN 

School of Management 

BS Human Resource 

Management 



MARIAJ.DONOGHUE 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 



DIANNE K. DONOVAN 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 

Computer Science 



PAULINE DONOVAN 

School of Education 

AB Human Development 



ROSEMARIE C. DOOLEY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



296 / Seniors 



POLLY E. DOTTER 

School of Education 

AB Human Development 

Psychology 



ARMAND H. DOUCETTE 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Computer Science 



STEPHEN F. DOUCETTE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Mathematics 

Computer Science 



STEPHEN T. DOWLING 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Mathematics 



CATHYJ.DOWNES 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 




PAUL C.DOWNEY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Economics 

Philosophy 



MARIA-ERIETTA DOXOPOULOS 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



DEBORAH K. DOYLE 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 



EDWARD A. COYLE 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



JAMES M. DOYLE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 

History 




kMiMLM 



KAREN M. DOYLE 


EDWIN E. DRAKES 


KURTA.DREIBHOLZ 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


AB Speech Communication 


AB Political Science 


AB Economics 


English 


Speech Communications 





PETER E. DRUMMOND 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



MICHELLE S. DUBE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Romance Language 




FRANCIS C.DUDZIK 


JACQUELYN R. DUFFY 


KATHLEEN A. DUFFY 


MALACHYJ.DUFFY 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


AB Mathematics 


BS Marketing 


AB Mathematics 


AB English 



PATRICIA L. DUFFY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 

History 



Seniors / 297 



JOSEPH P. DUGGAN 

School of Management 

BS Finance 

Computer Science 



JAMES E.DUNFORD 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



ALICE M. DUNN 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



KATHLEEN M. DUNN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Sociology 



MARTHA M. DUNN 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 




DENISE A DUNNE 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



MARTHA A. DUPEE 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



CYNTHIA J. DUPUIS 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



ELIZABETH M. DURKIN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Art History 



PATRICE A. DUVERNAY 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Chemistry 

Pre-Medical 




MELISSA ELLEN DYAN 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



CATHERINE M. EAGAN 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Chemistry 

Pre-Medical 



EDDIE THE EAGLE 

School Aeronatics 

BS Commercial Aviation 



KAREN L. EARLE 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



RAYMOND EAST 
School of Management 
BS Business Management 




LORI E. EBANIETTI 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 

Speech Communication 



LORI EGAN 

Evening College 

AB Computer Science 



JOSE M. EGUI 

School of Management 

BS Economics 



JOSEPH W. ELCHESEN 

School of Management 

BS Operations Management 



SKARIN L. ELICONE 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



298 / Seniors 




LEISAK.ELIS 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Chemistry 



KAREN ELLINGHAUS 

School of Education 

AB Elem-Special Education 




ROBERTA. ELLIS 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



JILLA.ELMSTROM 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 




DEBORAH A. ELSASSER 

School of Management 

BS Marketing Organizational 

Studies 



CHARLOTTE M. EMERSON 

School of Education 
AB Human Development 




Theres Puleo 



Bull Sessions 



"Hey Kerry, you awake?" 

"Huh?" 

"C'mon, wake up. Don't you want to hear 
all about it?" Vicky coyly asked. 

"Oh, oh, you're back. Yea, tell me . . ." 
Kerry rolled over, turned on the light, and sat 
up with her full attention on Vicky. "Well, 
what happened? Did you have a good 
time? 

"Well, we met at the T station and we 
were off. He had on, you know, sorta dress 
pants, oh, and this really fun tie. He looked 
fantastic. Well we went to 29 Newbury 
Street fordinner. Not bad, huh. He was really 
trying to impress me . . . talking about his 
new car back home and how he's got this 
great job lined up for after graduation. He 
thought he was being subtle. I must admit, I 
was impressed. Oh yea, get this, he or- 
dered Perrier Jouet, Mr. Beer Guzzler him- 
self I" The two start laughing uncontrollably. 

"Ooooo, look at Gary all dressed up roll- 
ing in at 3:00 a.m. Could it have been a 
date with Vicky?" Marc asked from the sofa 
where he had just thrown himself, as Tom 
and Peter enter. 

"What's up, Gar? How'd it go?" asked 
Pete. 

"Ju—st fin— nel!" Gary said with an ear to 
ear grin. 

"Okay, but seriously, how'd it go?" Tom 
pursued with a devilish grin, 

"I dont know what you mean." Gary re- 
plied as he loosened his tie. 

"Okay, we'll be blunt, how far did you 
get?" Pete jokingly asked as Tom and Marc 
broke into laughter. 

"Faneull Hall" Gary replied. 

"What a funny guyl Alright, be evasivel 
Where'd ya go?" Marc asked. 

"Dinner, dancing, and around." Gary re- 
plied. 

"Around where?" Tom pursued. 



"Well, after we went dancing, we walked 
a little, talked a little, and then went back to 
her room." 

"Her room, huh? Now we're getting 
somewhere " Pete demanded 

"We had fun and she was very apprecia- 
tive of such a pleasant evening. Just use 
your Imagination." Gary smugly replied. 

"Well, I'd say he might have gotten some- 
where." Marc observed. 

"Then what?" Kerry asked 

"Well, then we went dancing. He's not too 
bad — a little funny and awkward at first 
though," she laughed a little, remem- 
bering. "He's really sweet. After Jason's 
closed, we took the T back and walked 
around campus a bit. He stopped trying to 
be so impressive and everything was 
great," Vicky continued. 

"Well, is he 'in love'?" Kerry asked. 

"I think so. He asked me when we could 
go out again and said he thought I was 
really special. He's gonna call tomorrow." 
Vicky finished excitedly. 

"Hello," Vicky answered the phone. 

"HI, Vicky? It's Gary." 

"Ohhh ... Hi, how are you?" Vicky coyly 
asked. 

"Excellent. So did you have fun last 
night?" 

"Yea — alot. We'll have to do it again 
sometime," Vicky hinted. 

"Well, there's always next weekend." 
Gary continued. 

"Terrific..." 

The two hung up a few minutes later. 
"Well, I'd say we'll be seeing a lot more of 
him," Vicky said to Kerry. Then under her 
breath, "At least I hope so." 

— Liz Lamb 
— Berta Blaz 




HARRY ENG 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 

Accounting 



KATHLEEN A. ENGELMAN 

School of Education 
AB Human Development 



DIANE ENGLERT 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Psychology 

Economics 



SHEILA E. ENGLISH 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



JEANMARIE ENNIS 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



Seniors / 299 



JEFFREY K.ERICKSON 


ALEXANDER M. ERNESTI 


AUSTIN L. ERRICO 


MARY ESEMPLARE 


JOHN F. ESPOSITO 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


; Arts & Sciences 


AB Economics 


BS Biology 
Pre-Medical 


BS Biology 
Pre-Medical 


BS Computer Science 


AB Theater 







USAJ.ETSCOVITZ 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



PAULA.EVANGELISTA 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Italian 

Pre-Medical 



TIMOTHY J. EVANS 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



SANDRA L. EVELETH 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 



STEVEN F. FACHADA 

School of Management 

BS Finance 

Philosophy 




ELIZABETH M. FACTOR 


WENDY T.FAI 


ANN FALLON 


MICHAEL LFANTOZZI 


JOAN E. FANTUCCHIO 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Nursing 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


BS Psychology 


BS Accounting 


BS Nursing 


AB Economics 


AB English 
Speech Communication 





MARIA ELENA FARFAN 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



BRENDAM. FARINA 

School of Education 

AB Elem-Special Education 



NATALIE FARINA 

School of Management 

BS Management 



WYNNE A. FARLAND 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Pre-Medical 

Biology 



BRIAN E. FARLEY 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



300 / Seniors 



ROBERT R. FARRELL 

School of Management 

BS Marketing Finance 

Computer Science 



ANNA FAUSTINI 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



SUSAN C. FEENEY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 

Theology 



MARY P. FELLENZ 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 



THOMAS FENNELL 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Philosophy 




GONZALO A. FERNANDEZ 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Psychology 

Pre-Medical 



ISAURO FERNANDEZ 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



M. SEAN FERNANDEZ 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 

Accounting 



BRIDGET C. FERNS 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 



CARA M. FERRAGAMO 

Arts & Sciences 

AB French 




ANTHONY R. FERRARIS 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



SUSAN T. FERREN 

Arts &. Sciences 

AB English 




JAMESJ.FERRERA 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 

Computer Science 



KATHLEEN G. FERRIGNO 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 




Andy Ryan 



Hometown Friends 



By the time senior year had rolled around 
most of us had faced a painful reality. As 
we sat at home over Thanksgiving breaks 
watching BC football games with home- 
town friends, we began to realize how 
things had changed. We had grown apart 
over the years. We no longer shared com- 
mon experiences on common ground. As 
we watched "ourteam", we realized to our 
hometown friends it was just another foot- 
ball game. Whereas we once shared feel- 
ings of comradery in high school, the 
loyalties we felt toward our colleges ran 
much deeper. While they weren't interested 
in the football game we weren't interested 
in their fraternity talk. In many cases it was 
an inevitable thing, but in some cases the 
friendship suffered from lack of time spent 
together. There were new friendships, new 
interests, new goals. Freshman year the let- 
ters went back and forth, the "after 



11:00PM" phone calls were frequent. The 
vacations which only fell five weeks apart 
seemed to take forever to arrive. The time 
between visits dragged on forever. It 
seemed that we just couldn't live without 
our hometown friends. To loosen the grip 
brought on waves of fear of losing them for- 
ever, But the friends like those from home 
cannot be lost so easily. They are there to 
stay. As the years passed the letter box 
didn't fill up as quickly. The phone bills 
weren't near as high, (thank goodness). But 
the decrease in phone calls and letters did 
not mark the end of the relationship. Just 
because there weren't as many calls home 
didn't mean the visits weren't just as valu- 
able senior year as they had been fresh- 
man year. The friendship didn't die ... 
perhaps the changes should just be filed 
under growing up. 

— Berta Blatz 



Seniors / 301 




Junior Point of View 



For many, our junior year was 
the most exciting and yet 
frightening of our collegiate 
years. The senior class was grad- 
uating ... It would soon be our 
time to shine. Senior year was a 
few short months away with all 
the glory it had to offer from first 
choice of classes to Mod life. That 
was the excitement. The most 
frightening aspect that hit at the 
end or junior year was the reality 
that only one year; 52 weeks; 365 
days separated you from the real 
world. Senior year, with all the fun, 
would also be full of interviews, 
resumes, applying to grad 
school, more interviews and alot 
of worrying. The security blanket 
of college would soon be lifted. 
Senior year would be the prepa- 
ration to face the real world and 
lots of fun 1 1 

— Berta Blaz 





EILEEN A. FIASCONE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB French 




JOHN A. FIDLER 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



Makis latridis 





!m tM aM 




AMYLFIUPPONE 


DONALD G. FILLION 


STEPHANIE FINE 


PAUL J. FISCHER 


JAMES M. FISCHERKELLER 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


AB History 


AB Economics 


AB Speech Communications 


BS Finance 
Marketing 


AB English 




JANET M. FISHER 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



MARK J. FISHER 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Geology 



CYNTHIA E. FITZGERALD 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



PAUL T.FITZGERALD 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 

History 



ROBERT P. FITZGERALD 

School of Education 

AB Human Development 



302 / Seniors 



STEPHEN J. FITZGERALD 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 



BARBARA J. FITZGIBBON 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



DANIEL J. FITZPATRICK 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 



KERRY A. FITZPATRICK 

School of Eaucation 

AB Human Development 



MARY CATHERIN FITZPATRICK 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 




RICHARD M. FITZPATRICK 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 

Philosophy 



KEVIN H. FLAGG 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



BRIAN F. FLAHERTY 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



CHARLES T.FLAHERTY 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



ELIZABETH FLAHERTY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 

English 




BRIAN T.FLANAGAN 


MAUREEN T. FLANAGAN 


ROBIN N. FLATAU 


MARGARET E. FLEMING 


PAMELA FLEMING 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


AB Philosophy 


AB History 
Psychology 


BS Computer Science 


AB Sociology 
English 


AB History 





PHYLLIS A. FLENO 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



KATHLEEN S. FLETCHER 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



ALEXANDRA FLORESCU 

School of Education 
AB Elementary Education 



ELLEN M. FLOWERS 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



DOUGLAS R. FLUTIE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



Seniors / 303 



BARBARA J. FLYNN 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



DANIEL J. FLYNN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 



ELIZABETH A. FLYNN 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 



ELIZABETH J. FLYNN 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 



ELLEN M. FLYNN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 

Economics 




JOHN C. FLYNN 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Chemistry 



KATHERINE M. FLYNN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



KATHYRN J. FOREST 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 

Speech Communication 



MATTHEW W.FOLEY 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



ROBERT R. FOLEY 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 

Finance 




ALISON FOLINO 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



GLENN A. FONTAINE 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



NANCY L. FOOTE 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



PATRICIA FORBES 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



PAUL L. FORD 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 




ERNEST FORTIN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 



CARL P. FORTUNA 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 

Philosophy 



JOHN D. FOSTER 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



WILLIAM N. FOTOS 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 

Marketing 



JEFFREY D. FOTTA 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Economics 

Philosophy 



304 / Seniors 



Makis latridis 



What a "Bahgain" 



The semester's spending money had run 
dry. Loose change and worn out one dollar 
bills were all that lined your pockets. But, 
you quickly got sick of reruns of "Love Boat" 
and old movies on TV 38, This was one of 
those situations in which being a "student" 
was to your advantage. BC offered many 
student discounts for various forms of enter- 
tainment. As you went to the bookstore 
Monday through Friday between 11-3, there 
was someone sitting In the McElroy Tlckey 
Booth, This box held some of the best bar- 
gains In town. Okay, so you had to stand in 
line for hours for Homecoming and Screw 
Your Roommate tickets. For many that was 
their only trip to the ticket booth, But, it had 
more to offer . . . everything from tickets to 
student Shakespearean events or just 
movie passes. One could buy a movie pass 
to Circle or Showcase cinemas for about 
S3. $3 for a flick . . . What a bargain. 



Okay, so that was the bargain of the day 
for social activities, But what does 'bargain' 
mean beyond the social sense of the word? 
Yes, you're right — shopping. Don't tell me 
that you didn't feel the need to buy those 
flowers outside of McElroy because they 
seemed so much cheaper than the aver- 
age price at the flower shop in town. 

And clothes. Oh yes the clothes. The col- 
lege student always had a sharp eye for 
those special sales that made it a little 
easier to spend that money (that Dad sent 
for groceries) on the sweater that had 
caught your eye in the store window. 

McElroy lobby was famous for it's vendors 
that came in with their handmade items. 
Usually, if you kept your eyes open some 
item eventually seemed worth its price. Like 
the saying went— "What a Bahgainl" 

— Roberta Blaz 



JEANNETTE L. FOUGERE 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



KIMBERLY FOULKE 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 











CHRISTINA CFOULKES 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



ELLEN M, FOX 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 




AMY L, FRACASSINI 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



THERESA A, FRANCIS 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Mathematics 



SHARON E. FRANK 

School of Education 

AB Elem-Special Education 



LYNNE A. FRATES 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



CATHY A. FREDETT 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 

Economics 




MARY E. FREEMAN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 



PATRICIA A. FRIED 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 

Economics 



JUDEANN M. FRIEL 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 

Marketing 



GUY G. FUCCI 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 

Business 



MICHAEL J, FULLER 

School of Education 

AB English 



Seniors / 305 




Get me a Sweatshirt 



-ie a sweatshirt." 

"What color?" 

"Oh, l don't care as long as it 
says Boston College ." 

That's all anyone ever seemed 
to want was sweatshirts. And in 
turn that seemed to be all you 
ever got By the time we were se- 
niors, the old drawer allocated 
tor sweatshirts was more than full. 
At first you thought it was only you 
ha overwhelming amount of 
sweatshirts but once you took a 
look around you noticed they 
were everywhere. And it seemed 
thai e.e-\L\.v.* knew somebody 
a* \otre Dame a Seorgetownoi 
the Naval Academy. It almost 
seemed that those sweatshirts 
outnumbered the B.C. sweatshirts 
on campus! But what felt better 
on a cold snowy day than a 
warm old sweatsti rt7 




A'Q% ^\.v 




5/-~-E~\E ^-5;" 
Arts & Sciences 

English 




;.\.v e~c<?i 




AB Early Child-Special 






. ^?\ AV 55- ; -\5- 
A -> n 5c r -ces 

-5 \'C~V"C*C$ 



^A. xA A 5A5E 

Scv\r c ::.;rr 

AJEe^-Soecc Ecccre- 



a;e\v -?a^. av 

A" _V C \v--S-NJ 

55 \.-5 \g 




-AVE.A. v?A„ 4;? 

5o-.v o- V s \: 

555 \. 5 -o 



CA vE A v?A_AGA\ 



\ 



?A\E *?A„A> 
A-s 5v5c r -c^ 



'". ' CO" C ' 



^r~-c cA^av 


VA.xEEN" -?A_\ 


A"*5 5a 55C;?~Or ! i 


A~s 5v5c r:?; 


ASE-n: 5." 


A5E-\5 sr 




:::•:•' rs 



306 Seniors 



J Li 



SUSAN M. GALVIN 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



VANESSA S. GAMBERDELLA 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



JAMES H. GARAVENT1 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 



LISAAGARBARINO 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 



DIANA GARCIA 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Spanish 

French 




SUZANNE GARCIA 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



KATHRYN E. GARDELLA 

School of Education 
AB Human Development 



SUSAN GARDNER 

School of Management 

BS Human Resource 

Management 

Marketing 



GINA M. GARGANO 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



MARY H. GARRETT 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 

Finance 




DEBORAH M. GARRITY 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



LAUREN A. GARRITY 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



JONATHAN F. GATES 


KEVIN D. GATES 


JOHN L GAUDIO 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


AB Speech Communication 


BS Pre-Medical 
Biology 


AB English 




MAX G. GAUJEAN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Economics 

History 



STEPHEN G. GELLOS 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



CATHERINE A. GELS 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



ANNM.GENDRON 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 

Psychology 



VERONICA GERALD 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



Seniors / 307 





1 F**- ^^^t 







NICHOLAS D. GERE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



ELIZABETH A. GERMANI 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 

Speech Communication 



JEAN MARIE GERONDEAU 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



LAURINE GHENT 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Mathematics 

Computer Science 



TIZIANAGHERARDI 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Computer Science 




Hail to the Chief 



A universi- 
ty's main out- 
let to reach 
students lies 
within the 
Student Gov- 
ernment. At 
the helm of 
the UGBC 
was president Jeff Thielman. A political science 
and philosophy major, Jeff had many goals set for 
his year of administration. He felt it was necessary 
to open a university forum In which students, fac- 
ulty and administration could gather and discuss 
issues important to the university such as ROTC. This 
allowed all views to be voiced. He saw the need 
for more concrete university programming. The 
Campus Pub Series gave students a place to go 
with friends any day of the week. He also felt that 
there should be more financial aid to less publi- 
cized sports, especially women's sports. Teams 
should not have to rely on money from the mem- 
bers of the team only, He felt most of the goals the 
UGBC set at the beginning of the year were met or 
slightly modified to compromise with administra- 
tion. He felt that the ability to communicate with 
the administration was an important reason for the 
success of his administration. 

He felt that BC had changed a great deal since 
his freshman year. The most obvious change was 
the dominance of sports. It wasn't important to get 
season tickets to any of the sports. Tickets were 
always available. He also noticed a growth of po- 
litical conservatism and that most students came 
from a higher socio-economic background, Every 
class has grown more intelligent and more tal- 
ented. As a result, the curriculum grew more chal- 
lenging. The emergence of two organizations has 
had, and will continue to have, a significant im- 
pact. One being Student Agencies, the other be- 
ing The Observer, an alternative to the Heights. 
He also noted some things that hadn't changed, 
but needed changing. The university is not admit- 
ting In enough minorities. He feels a change in this 
will bring about a more diverse student body. He 
also felt the administration needs to be more 
open. His Idea of a forum was an attempt to fulfill 
that need. 

He sees many positive things here. B.C. offers 
more that most university's in the country. It has one 
of the best libraries in the northeast. It has some of 
the best professors in their respective fields. And 
how many schools have produced a Heismann 
trophy winner? 

"It's a great school. The character and spirit of 
the student body makes Boston College." That 
said It all. 




Geoff Why 



308 / Seniors 



ROSANNE E. GIAMBALVO 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



JOSEPH D. GIAMO 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 

Marketing 



RITA GIANNANTONIO 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 

Accounting 



CYNTHIA GIANOUKOS 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 

Marketing 



JOHN R. GIBBONS 

School of Education 

AB Elem-Special Education 





kAiMttem 



JAN M. GIBSON 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Mathematics 



JAMES E. GIEBUTOWSKI 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



SCOTTA.GIESELMAN 
School of Management 
BS General Management 



KATHLEEN M. GILBERT 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 



BRIGID A. GILCHRIST 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Sociology 




BRIAN M. GILLIGAN 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



LYNN A. GILLIS 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Sociology 



CYNTHIA J. GILLON 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



CAROL M. GILMARTIN 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 

Marketing 



MARYK.GINGRASS 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 




SUZANNE R. GINOUVES 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Mathematics 



RALPH GIORGIO 

School of Management 

BS Economics 



LISA M. GIRARD 

School of Education 

AB Elem-Special Education 



DAVID GIRIONI 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



MICHAEL A. GIUFFRIDA 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 



Seniors / 309 



PAUL A. GIVEN 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Mathematics 



JUDITH N. GLEBA 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Romance Language 



WILLIAM A. GLOS 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



MARY E. GLOTZBACH 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



MICHAEL J. GLYNN 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 




MICHAEL O.GLYNN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 



YVONNE GO 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



GREGORY J. GODVIN 
School of Management 

BS Finance 

Economics 



EILEEN M. GOERSS 

School of Management 

BS General Management 




BARRY P. GOLDBERG 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 






PAUL GOLDMAN 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



LAURIE R. GOLDSMITH 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



ISMENIAS. GOMES 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



HENRY GOMEZ 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 



JAILYJ.GOMEZ 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Computer Science 




NANCY M. GONSALVES 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



AUGUSTO C GONZALES 


GRACIANA M. GONZALEZ 


SEAN M, GOOD 


SUSAN M. GOODE 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


BS Computer Science 


AB Economics 


AB Economics 


AB Economics 



310 / Seniors 




GEORGE T.GOODLIFFE 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 



ELLEN M. GOODWIN 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 




WENDY L. GORIN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Sociology 



ROSEMARY GORMAN 

School of Management 

BS Human Resource 

Management 




SUZANNE M. GORMAN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 



MAUREEN E. GORMLEY 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 




Mara Buddy 

Where's Mom when you need her? 



Some things never, not even in the Hig- 
gins stairs, seemingly endless but suddenly 
ending journey from freshman to senior 
year, cease to be needed. There are just 
certain necessities of life, vital to human ex- 
istence. Necessities such as all night study 
sessions, White Mountain ice cream breaks, 
and Mom. (Gone are the days of just plain 
apple pie.) From Keyes North to Mods 2A, 
"Mom-need" can be seen. 

The laundry bag, with clothes hanging 
ever so distastefully out of it, Is filled twice 
beyond the capacity Mom would allow 
before she "just did it herself(pout)." The eye 
catches sight of a crumbled granola bar, 
aged quite well. A circled calendar date 
reinforces the "Mom-need" even more — 
who else can remember Uncle Harry's birth- 
day? 

There does come a time, however, when 
all the reminders do not seem very signifi- 
cant. In the day-by-day treadmill, sure, but 
In the long run? After all, the laundry will get 
done when the sock drawer Is empty, the 
food the sock drawer is empty, the food will 
remain in the kitchen after one episode of 
sleep-crushed Oreos, and Uncle Harry 
stopped counting birthdays years ago. No, 
In the reflective days of Senior Week, Mom 
probably won't be remembered for that. 
There's just more to it . . . 

Finals week is here. A finance exam with 
the potential for causing the first docu- 
mented case of a 21 -year-old cardiac ar- 
rest patient hovers threateningly on the 



Wednesday morning horizon. A computer 
project has a catch that only Mr. Wang 
might be able to debug, and an advertis- 
ing meeting ended in a screaming battle. 
(And then there's always the kitchen floor 
that no one will clean.) So then Mom calls 
and you tell her all about it — and she never 
calls collect. Admit It, you love how she wor- 
ries. 

The phone conversations always seem to 
be the same. For the most part, she talks 
and you nod at the receiver. But the end Is 
always the same — a request for FOOD. 
(Not depending on B.C. Dining Service 
doesn't guarantee homemade chocolate 
chip cookies sent interstate anymore, does 
it?l) And even if she's livid just because 
you've bounced a check — for the third 
time In a month — she'll probably send 
something. 

Through It all, one constant remains. 
Sometimes it's only Mom that knows when 
things are really bad and you're not just blow- 
ing up as you usually do the third Wednes- 
day of every month. She hears when your 
roommate is being a lazy slob and your 
English teacher has decided to pick on you 
this semester for no reason. It doesn't really 
matter that she's 500 miles and 4 dollars 
every 20 minutes phone cost away from all 
of it. She'll listen. 

Home can come to Chestnut Hill. MA. 
And we all need it, whether we realize it 
now or not. 

— Laurie Uertz 




TAMRAL GORMLEY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



ROBERT F.GOROG 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



EDMUND P. GRACZYK 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 

Marketing 



BRENDAN B. GRADY 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



DONNA M. GRADY 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



Seniors / 311 



ANNE L. GRAHAM 


MICHELE A. GRANEY 


DENISE A. GRASSO 


GERALD D. GREELY 


SARA JANE GREENBLOTT 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Nursing 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


AB History 


AB Economics 


BS Nursing 


BS Psychology 
Pre-Medical 


' AB Political Science 




MARY E. GREENHALGH 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 



MICHAEL G.GREGORY 

School of Management 

BS Operation Management 



SUSAN L. GRIEB 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



DAWN E. GRIFFIN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



KRISTIN M. GRIFFIN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 




LANCE R. GRIFFIN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Classical Studies 



NICHOLAS GRIFFIN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



RICHARD F. GRIFFITHS 
Arts & Sciences 
BS Psychology 



JANET M. GRIMES 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 



ADAMW.GROBIN 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Chemistry 




MARYK.GROVER 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



CHERYL A. GUALTIERI 

School of Education 

AB Human Development 

Elementary Education 



MICHAEL E.GUERIN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Economics 

French 



GEORGE L. GUERRA 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Independent 



JEANINEGUIDO 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



312 / Seniors 





AMY GUILLEMETTE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 



GREGORY GUIMOND 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 

English 




CARLA R. GULINO 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



MARAGURSKI 
Arts & Sciences 
BS Psychology 



Andy Ryan 



Course Registration 



Twice a year, students had to deal with 
the dreaded course registration. It was so 
confusing. So many questions to ask your- 
self. "Would it be better to take all my 
classes in the morning and have the after- 
noons free? Or would it be better to take all 
my classes in the afternoon and have the 
morning to sleep late? Should I try to get all 
my classes on Mondays, Wednesdays, and 
Fridays and have Tuesdays and Thursdays 
free? Should I take a class at night for three 
hours once a week? Or should I just take it 
during the day so I don't have to sit there for 
three hours?" 

And then there were the actual courses 
. . . "Which ones should I take? Should I take 
Practice of Criticism this semester with a 
teacher I don't want and a bad time just to 
get It over with? Or should I wait and see 
who's teaching it next semester? What's a 
good 'gut' to fill my science requirement?" 



And what about the professors? it was 
hard to know how to judge a professor If 
you asked twenty different people who've 
had him before what he likes, you'd un- 
doubtedly get twenty different responses. 
And what about how he grades well, 
those who did well would say he was a fair 
grader but those who didn't do as well 
would say he was much too hard. And if you 
asked a professor you respected what he 
thought of the professor in question, he 
would always end his response with: "But 
then again, that's just my opinion as a col- 
league not as a student. In that respect, I 
don't know what value it will be to you." 

And in the end, it really didn't seem to 
matter. By the time you got to registration all 
the courses you had carefully chosen were 
full. Back to the drawing board. 

— RMB 




ELISABETH HAASE 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 



JOHN L. HAGE 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



KARENJ.HAGEN 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



RICHARD A. HAGOPIAN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 



KRISTA M. HAHN 

School of Management 

BS Finance 




GLORIA J. HAINES 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



ANJACHAKOSHIMA 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



SCOH C.HAMMOND 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



MAYA HANDWERK 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Psychology, Sociology 



JOHN P. HANLON 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



Seniors / 313 




The Chef 



The door swung open and 
slammed against the wall. Sue 
looked around the comer just In 
time to see her roommate Mary 
stumble In with two full bags of 
groceries. 

"Give me a hand will ya?" 

"Sure, I've got nothing better to 
do." 

Fifteen minutes later, the two 
had finished unpacking the fresh 
vegetables, wrapped the 
chicken and beef, put away the 
flour and sugar and stored the 
potatoes and rice. 

"Gee Mary, looks like the mak- 
ings of some well balanced 
meals. Are you turning into some 
sort of chef?" 

"Uh huh, In fact, tonight I'm go- 
ing to start with my specialty — 
peanut butter ala jelly atop a 
fresh slice of whole wheat 
bread." (sigh) 

— Tania Zielinski 






MARY M. HANNA 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 




MICHAEL E. HANNAN 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 




SUSAN M. HANSBERRY 


NANETTE E. HANSEN 


WILLIAM A. HANSEN 


LISAHARALAMBOS 


MICHAEL J. HARDY 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


BS Marketing 


AB Speech Communication 


BS Accounting 


AB Psychology 


BS Computer Science 




RICHARD D. HARDY 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



ROBERT T.HARKINS 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Mathematics 

Philosophy 



DEBRAH.HARMEUNG 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



PETER J. HARMON 
Arts & Sciences 

AB English Speech 
Communication 



GERALD B. HARRIS 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 

Computer Science 



314 / Seniors 



IAN A. HARRIS 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



ROBERT D. HARRIS 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 

Philosophy 



THERESE E. HARRIS 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 

Psychology 



PATRICIA A. HARRISON 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



GREGORY C.HART 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Mathematics 




KATHLEEN M. HART 
Arts & Sciences 
BS Psychology 



CLARE E. HARTIGAN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Sociology 



LINDA M. HARTLEY 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



LISA M. HARTUNIAN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Computer Science 

Mathematics 



ARTHUR W.HARVEY 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 




LAWRENCE HARVEY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



MELISSA H.HASTINGS 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



JANE R, HAUBRICH 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



SHEILA J. HAVICAN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 

Spanish 



HEIDI HAYES 

School of Management 

BS General Management 




JENNIFER M. HAYES 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



FRANCINE D. HAYWOOD 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



MAURAJ.HEALEY 

School of Education 

AB Elem-Special Education 



KATHRYN A. HEALY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



PHILIP M. HEALY 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



Seniors / 315 



ROBERT J. HEAPS 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Chemistry 

Pre-Medical 



ROBERT M.HEBELER 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 

Theology 



BRIAN M.HEFELE 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



PHILIP M.HEILPERN 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 

Finance 



BARBARA M. HELMES 
School of Education 

AB Mathematics 
Secondary Education 




PAUL F. HELOU 


CLAUDIA HENAO 


MARYBETH HENDERSON 


CHRISTINE E. HENNAS 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


AB English 


AB Early Childhood 


AB English 


AB Mathematics 



RANDY Z. HENSLEY 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 




DONNA M. HERLIHY 


STEPHEN W. HERRICK 


KATHLEEN M. HESSION 


MARGARET M. HESSION 


MARGARET R. HICKEY 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


AB Economics 


AB Economics 


BS Finance 


AB History 


AB French 





EILEEN A. HIGGINS 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



SUSAN M. HILDRETH 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



LAURENCE J. HILL 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



PETER L. HILLENBRAND 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 



ROBERT D. HILLMAN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Economics 

History 



316 / Seniors 



Jesuits 



Boston College, It was tradition. It was gothic buildings 
surrounded by beautifully manicured landscapes. It was 
warm and old. But more than all that, It was "that" Catholic 
school, with Its Jesuit tradition. 

Perhaps with some prejudice It was said, but Boston Col- 
lege did stand out among other top ranked schools. And a 
great deal of this notoriety could have been attributed to its 
strong Christian ideal constantly Idealized through its Jesuit 
community. 

This past year, there were one hundred and twenty Jesuits 
on campus, seventy three of whom held administrative or 
teaching positions. Twelve years of schooling were required 
to become a Jesuit. The Jesuits at BC follow the principles 
and Ideals of St. Ignatius. In a nut shell, one could summarize 
them as the necessary function of seeking God in all things. 
And this was the purpose of the Jesuit community here at BC : 
to lead students toward wisdom and understanding which 
came from personal growth; that was to say, the attainment 
of self confidence, judgement and awareness in all things. A 
BC student was more apt to grow personally with the ideals 
of the Jesuits entrenched into their heads through the various 
core courses which were taken that were taught by Jesuits. 

Tradition was nothing without meaning and the Jesuits 
would be nothing more than men In black suits if it were not 
for their belief in the St. Ignatius philosophies. If they did not 
strive the way they did to produce not only intellectually, but 
more importantly, spiritually, men and women who obtain a 
strong moral basis, they would be leading a life In blind faith 
rather than having knowledge as their shield for life. It is 
important for these men and women to learn that their life will 
be enhanced with this newly found knowledge. 

For many, BC was their favored choice for a college edu- 
cation, not only for its curriculum, but also for the moral and 
Ideals it stood for. The curriculum at BC did not over empha- 
size the Jesuit tradition, but it was possible to take a Jesuit if 



one wanted to leam from a Jesuit point of view. Without such 
values and people like the Jesuits to supplement these 
Ideals and guide students spiritually, Boston College's grad- 
uates would not have the "edge" that they possess: a fine 
education concerning scholarly things coupled with an un- 
derstanding of what it truly has meant to be "at peace with 
oneself and so with the world." 

— Elizabeth Lamb 




% 




Brian Morrill 




SCOTT W.HINES 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Chemistry 

Pre-Medical 



LAURA M. HINNENDAEL 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



LISAA.HINTELMANN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



MARY SUE HOBAN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



CHERYL HOCHHEISER 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 




CYNTHIA J. HOCKENHULL 
School of Management 

BS Finance 

Economics 



ROBERT E. HODGE 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



PATRICIA M. HOEY 
School of Management 

BS Marketing 
Speech Communication 



CHRISTOPHER J. HOGAN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



MAUREEN HOGAN 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 

Marketing 



Seniors / 317 




TROY M. HOLDING 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Pre-Dental 

Biology 




TIMOTHY E. HOLTSNIDER 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



Once Upon A Freshman Year 



Boston College, an 
everlasting academic 
Institution of higher 
learning has long been 
a beautiful structure 
gracing the skyline of 
Chestnut Hill's wooded 
suburbs. It's gothic ar- 
chitecture has been inspirational to the Catholic tradition of 
Education. 

As seniors recall BC. as it was when they arrived as a 
freshman, those with good memories remember a BC cam- 
pus that has changed over the years. The most obvious and 
striking example of this is the new O'Neill Library. Seniors only, 
will recall the old, Jesuit parking lot that used to exist on that 
very spot. 

Many residents of lower campus will also remember the 
old gravel pathway that connected lower to middle cam- 
pus and represented a much less tiresome alternative to the 
dreaded Higglns stairs. The path was a showcase for cre- 
ative graffiti. 

Other changes Included: the two million dollar renovation 
of Alumni Stadium, New Dorm becoming Walsh Hall, the 
Townhouses becoming Cardinal Medeiros Townhouses, 
and the New Theater opening. 

Changes continued to be a part of BC with the University 
plans of major changes for Lower Campus. 

— Leo M. Melanson 




Makis latridis 




ELISABETH H. HOLZER 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 

Philosophy 



BRIAN J. HONAN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 



THOMAS J. HONAN 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



PATRICIA M. HOPKINS 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



RICHARD T.HOPONICK 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 




PATRICIA A. HORN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



ROBERT D.HORNE 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Philosophy 



GEORGINA M. HORRIGAN 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



JANE B. HORRIGAN 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



JEFFREYS. HOSTAGE 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



318 / Seniors 



ELISABETH F. HOUGHTON 

School of Education 
AB Elementary Education 



MARY C.HOULIHAN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



MOIRA A. HOULIHAN 
Arts & Sciences 

AB History 
Speech Theater 



LAURAJ.HOURIHAN 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 



DANA G. HOWARD 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 




MARTHA E. HOWE 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



SHEILA B. HOWENSTEIN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 



RANDALL P. HOYT 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



CHI YU HSU 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



ERIC COLWELL HUDSON 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 




MARKJ.HUETHER 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



JOHN M. HURCHIK 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 



LISA IACOFAND 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 



MICHAEL LIANNAZZI 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Theology 

Pre-Medical 



ACIMAKIS D. IATRIDIS 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 




LAURA INCALCATERRA 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 



LISAC.INTINARELLI 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



CINDYA.IPPOLITO 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



JENNIFER M.IRELAND 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



CAROL N.IRIZARRY 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



Seniors / 319 



JOAN IRWIN 


ANN EMI IWASAKI 


HELENKAY JACOBY 


PATRICIA A. JACQUES 


ERIN PATRICIA JAEB 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


AB Mathematics 


AB Speech Communication 
Economics 


AB English 


BS Human Resource 
Management 


AB History 




MARINA JANHO 


GARY P. JANKOWSKI 


BRUCE M.JANSEN 


SALLY-ANN J. JANULEVICUS 


MICHAEL J. JARMUSZ 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


AB Economics 


AB Economics 


BS Biology 


AB Sociology 


BS Accounting 




French 


Chemistry 
Pre-Medical 


English 






EILEEN JEAR 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Art History 



ANNA MARIA JERACI 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 

Computer Science 



JANE E.JOHNSON 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 



KATHRYN M. JOHNSON 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Sociology 



LYNNE H. JOHNSON 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 




SHIRETTA A. JOHNSON 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 

Marketing 



ROBERT R. JONES 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



PAMELA R. JORDAN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Mathematics 

Philosophy 



RICHARD T. JOSEPH 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



SEAN P. JOYCE 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



320 / Seniors 



MIGUEL A. JURADO 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 



PEGGY JUST 

School of Education 

AB Elementary Education 



ELIZABETH M. KADLEC 

Arts & Sciences 

AB French 

English 



MANUELA KAHLENBORN 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



WILLIAM W. KALIFF 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 

Philosophy 




Andy Ryan 

Munchies and Late Night Liquids 



Remember those nights of endless study- 
ing when It just wasn't sinking in? Or working 
on that paper only to come down with a 
severe case of writer's block? Sounds famil- 
iar, right? The cure, of course, was as much 
a part of college life as skipping classes — 
the study break. The key element of the 
study break was its contagiousness — any 
excuse to blow off work would do and join- 
ing friends with the same "sick-of-studying" 
point of view made it all the better. 

When left to the imagination, study 
breaks could take almost any form from 
spontaneous parties with a couple of pals 
to some vicious snow fights at three-o'clock 
in the morning. The most popular study 
breaks during underclassman years 
ranged from massive popcorn sessions on 
the floor and late-night excursions to FFF or 
MDQ's to heading down to the Plex with the 
guys for some intense hoop games. With the 
openings of the Casba and White Moun- 
tain Creamery, late night munchies be- 
come more accessible and consequently 
much more appealing. At those late night 
hours when the mind was filled to its max- 
imum with theories and principles and 
mathmatical formulas, who was con- 
cerned with the Intellect? All the student 
was interested in was letting a little of that 
"book-stuff" out and letting in some good 
clean fun. Who cared about how many 
calories were in a hot fudge, large scoop 
oreo ice-cream with two mix-ins sundae? 1 1 

As the late junior and senior years ap- 
proached, the event of legality gave the 
late night break an added dimension. With 



Chips and M.A.'s almost around the cam- 
pus corner, a couple of Budweisers (or Bud- 
weiser Lights If you prefer) often put an 
enlightening perspective on the theory of 
the fundamental, psychoanalytical studies 
of major literary cirticisms. Even though 
these pubs were christianed as BC favor- 
ites, the idea that one could go into the city 
and hit up some of the downtown establish- 
ments was an exciting and innovative idea 
for curing the study blahs. 

The most bizarre study breaks usually oc- 
curred during the final examination period 
when students ate, drank, and slept with 
their books propped open in front of them. 
Around the point when one realized that 
they had about three more chapters to 
learn, (which had never even been read 
once), a final paper that was to be handed 
in the next day and still needed an intro- 
duction and concluding paragraph and 
. . . dawn was only hours away; one usually 
felt that inescapable need to stuff one's 
face with something that was totally irratio- 
nal and therefore most appealing. Hence 
the infamous, yet bizarre "munchies ma- 
nia". Or, just an outlet to let off some steam 
(like a yell out the window) helped immea- 
surably. One senior remembers a huge wa- 
ter fight during the spring finals sophomore 
year that left the hall floors drenched for 
three days. Sit back for a minute and try to 
recall the most memorable study break 
during your four years here at BC — now 
what's that big grin on your face for?!! 

— Maureen McNicholl and Tania Z. 



MINDY R. KALL 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



DIANE E. KALWELL 

School of Education 

AB Elementary Education 




GRACE MING YANN KAN 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



MARTIN J. KANE 

Aris & Sciences 

AB English 

Secondary Education 




ZOANNE KANGAS 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



LORI A. KAPINOS 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Mathematics 



Seniors / 321 







MELISA R. KAPLAN 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



MICHELLE L. KAPLAN 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 



STEVEN V. KARL 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



SUSAN L. KATZ 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



RUDAIN T, KAWAR 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 




FREDERICK K. KAYNOR 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 

Speech Communication 



SUSAN M, KEANE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



BRIAN T.KEARNEY 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



DANIEL J. KEATING 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



JILL A. KEATING 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 




PATRICIA L KEENAN 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 




SUSAN M. KEENAN 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



The 1984 Election 



During the 1984 Presidential 
election, voters at Boston College 
mirrored those throughout the na- 
tion. Ronald Reagan swept the 
campus by a 7% wider margin 
than that with which he ultimately 
swept the nation. 

The incumbent's personality, 
and his economic and foreign 
policies appealed to the values 
of American's. Even Mondale's 
two undisputed victories in the 
nationally televised debates and 
his historic appointment of a fe- 
male running mate, Geraldine 
Ferraro, did not narrow Reagan's 
lead. 

In accordance with this fall 
season's focus on football mania, 
a candidate known as "the gip- 
per" was understandably an 
easy winner at the "Heights". 

— Elizabeth Seigenthaler 




Geoff Why 



322 / Seniors 



SHELLY KEFGEN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communications 



MARGARET M.KELLEHER 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 

Psychology 



MAUREEN L. KELLEHER 

School of Education 

AB Human Development 



MARIANNA KELLEY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Romance Language 



MARY E. KELLEY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 




MAURA B. KELLEY 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



THOMAS E. KELLEY 

School of Management 

BS Finance 

Accounting 



DANIEL T.KELLY 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



JAMES P. KELLY 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



SHEILA M. KELLY 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 




MICHAEL P. KEMPLE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



JEFFREY MILLER KENKEL 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 



KERIAN L. KENLON 
School of Education 
AB Early Childhood 



MARY M.KENNEDY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



MICHAEL F.KENNEDY 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 





NANCY E. KENNEDY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



GERALD T.KEOHANE 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



KIM A. KEOUGH 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



NORA C. KERWIN 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



ERICJ.KFOURY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 

History 



Seniors / 323 



WENDYA.KHENTIGAN 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 



MICHAEL KICKHAM 

Evening College 

AB Computer Science 



DENNIS T.KILCULLEN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 

Philosophy 



MARKS.KILEY 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



NADINE K. KILEY 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 




PATRICIA M. KILLEEN 
School of Education 
AB Middle Education 



GHYUN KIM 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



HYO-JUNG KIM 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Theology 



SOKJ.KIM 
School of Management 

BS Marketing 
General Management 



BRIAN T.I. KINCADE 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 





BRIAN A. KING 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 



fit >/2 



KIMBERLY ELLEN KING 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



MICHAEL G.KING 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Philosophy 



THERESA M. KIRCHNER 

School of Management 

BS Economics 



KAREN A. KIRKLYS 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Film 

Speech Communication 




MAYA A. KLASHNYA 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Psychology 

English 



ROSEMARY N. KLEIN 

School of Management 

BS General Management 



PETER M. KLIDARAS 


ERIC M. KLINGLER 


GEORGE J. KLUCSARITS 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


BS English 


BS Physics 
Mathematics 


AB Political Science 



324 / Seniors 




ELIZABETH H. KOCHOR 

School of Education 

AB Human Development 

English 



ANNET.KOEHNE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 




SUSAN K. KOERBER 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



ANDREA J. KOLETAS 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 




LAUREN Z. KOSHGARIAN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 



EDWARD J. KOSTOLANSKY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 



(OBtRTA CTjja 




Andy Ryan 



Creative Decorating 



Maybe there weren't enough posters, 
plaques or paintings available in stores. 
Perhaps the supply of room decorations 
was much smaller than the demand. No 
one wanted a room of white walls and 
empty shelves. Once again, the resourceful 
B.C. students could not be outdone. 

Competition was fierce in the apartment 
or dorm room decorating arena. Each 
year, as we all piled our room decorations 
on top of the bulging suitcases in the back 
of the station wagon, Mom and Dad would 
wonder what we needed with those huge 
flags and street signs for. But after a week of 
decorating and hammering nails (oops], 
those little extras were exactly what made 
those rooms special, 

Apartment decorating was quite a fad. 
In any given apartment, one was likely to 
find quite a wide variety of room decora- 
tions "acquired" by the apartment resi- 
dents. Among some of the more popular 
Items were . . . 

STREET SIGNS: One has to feel sorry for the 
frustrated driver who is carefully trying to fol- 
low the directions given to him, Directions to 
turn left onto "Roberta Court", or "Michael's 
Street", or "Eagles Avenue" or trying to find 
"Norton Park Road" (to name a few) were 
useless unless he happened to be roaming 
the dorms of Boston College. 

FLAGS: The Stars and Stripes were the 
perfect wall decoration, They were large 
enough to cover an entire wall and colorful 
enough to brighten up a room. McDonald's 
flags were also a popular item. The symbol 
of those Golden Arches was close enough 



to the thought of cheeseburgers and Mc- 
Donald french fries to warm any students 
heart. For those with a special attachment 
to their heritage, flags of various countries 
were proudly displayed. 

TRAFFIC SIGNS: Along the lines of the typ- 
ical street sign these were a particularly 
dangerous acquisition. Try and explain to 
the friendly police officer why you just had 
to have that blinking Detour sign that was 
on the side of Interstate Highway -84. In the 
same breath, try and explain this odd de- 
sire to yourself I 

NETWORK SIGNS: With the college stu- 
dents particular affinity to sports, ABC, CBS, 
NBC, KATZ, and ESPN must all have gone 
into a field or onto a court expecting to lose 
their signs to the crafty hands of some ad- 
venturous college student. 

CRATES: The milk crates non-chalantly 
stolen from the back parking lots of grocery 
stores (or various other places where dairy 
products are supplied) were probably the 
most useful of the "acquired items". They 
were perfect for storage use, shelving food, 
books, albums, or sweaters. 

For some it was a hobby. For others, it was 
an adventure. For still others, it was just one 
of those crazy college things you always 
wanted to do. These deviant tendencies 
didn't make you potential bank robbers. At 
the end of the year, the sign, plaques, and 
flags get placed into a trunk to be long 
forgotten. Until one day, many years from 
now . , . think of the laughs it will bringl 

— Berta Blaz 




JUAN H. KOURI 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Sociology 



JULIE A. KUHN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



JULIE ANN KULAS 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Spanish 



TRACEYKULIGA 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 



KAREN E. KUN 

School of Management 

AB Marketing 

Philosophy 



Seniors / 325 



MICHAEL J. KUNTZ 

School of Management 

BS Finance 

Computer Science 



CHRISTINE M. KUPPENS 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 

Political Science 



LISA KURKER 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



JONATHAN A. KURTYKA 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Economics 

English 



GLORIA L. KURYS 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Chemistry 




There were 
signs of It 
everywhere 
. . . colorful 
lights deco- 
rating 
houses, 
green 
wreaths with big red bows, cards in mailboxes. 
There were even signs on the radio. Christmasill 
Whether it was Bruce's "Santa Claus is Coming to 
Town" or Bing's "White Christmas", after Thanksgiv- 
ing, the mood was set. But with finals the third week 
in December, how was one supposed to get in the 
spirit of things?? Well, anyone who ever wrote a 
letter addressed to the North Pole, or left out 
cookies and milk, or woke up at the crack of dawn 
to run downstairs and open presents could un- 
doubtedly find a little time to "make the yuletide 
gay." 

Once back from Thanksgiving break, the 
Heights was filled with Christmas fever. Everyone 
needed to break loose just one more time before 
finals and what better way than with a "Pre-finals 
Christmas party?" And, of course, everyone was 
decked out in their most festive outfits. Mods dec- 
orated with green and red streamers and a little 
garland here and there set the scene for a typical 
Christmas party. 

Santa Claus caps, kisses under the mistletoe, 
and sips of Peppermint Schnappes helped to 
bring spirits to a merry mood. For many it was the 
last chance they would have to party with BC 
friends before heading separate ways for the holi- 
days. Music cranked at its highest volume got the 
wild partiers rockin' on the living room's converted 
dance floor. Singing along to old Christmas carols 
could be heard well into the morning hours. 

For those daring enough to battle the elements 
and brave enough to expand upon their singing 
talents, there was Christmas caroling. Whether it 
was just around the mods or all through the neigh- 
borhoods of Chestnut Hill, some decided to share 
their Christmas cheer with others. 

One of the most exciting events of the Christmas 
season was the annual lighting at the Prudential 
Center. More singing of Christmas classics, hud- 
dling with friends to keep warm and the "Oohl" 
and "Aahl" as the lights came on all added to the 
cheerful festive mood. 
As they say, "Tis the season to be jolly ..." 

— Roberta Blaz 



Merry Mistletoe 




Andy Ryan 



326 / Seniors 



SUSAN Y. KUSUMOTO 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



AMY E. LACHAT 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



MARGUERITE A. LADAS 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 



LEOE.LAFERRIERE 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



MICHELLE A. LAGARCE 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 




TRUDY L. LAGERSTROM 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



BETTY LAI 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



Yuen Man Lam 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



ROBERT M. LAMARCA 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



GREGORY L. LAMB 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 




!■■ 



ARTHUR F. LAMIA 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 



ANTHONY J. LAMPASONA 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 



JEFFREY J. LANGAN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



MARGARET A. LANGAN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 



LINDA M.LANGFORD 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 




DIANE M. LANNON 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



RACELLE L. LANTING 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



WILLIAM M. LANZA 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Mathematics 



EDWIN A LAPRAD 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Biology 

Pre-Medical 



DANA M. LARKIN 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



Seniors / 327 



PATRICIA M. LAVIGNE 


KELLIE A. LAVIN 


JANICE LAVOIE 


MARK B. LAVOIE 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Nursing 


School of Nursing 


Arts & Sciences 


Speech Communication 


BS Nursing 


BS Nursing 


AB Political Science 
Philosophy 



ALBERT J. LAWRENCE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 




WILLIAM C. LAWRENZ 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Geology 



KATHLEEN A. LEAHY 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 



BERLINE LEE 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



CHUNG HAN LEE 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



CHRISTOPHER M. LEFEBVRE 

School of Management 

BS Economics 




JULIUS LEITNER 


MARK D. LEMIERE 


ANNE P. LENIHAN 


KELLY J. LEONARD 


MARIA J. LEONARD 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Management 


BS Biology 


AB Speech Communication 


AB Speech Communication 


BS Finance 


BS Computer Science 
Organizational Studies 




THOMAS G. LEONARD 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Psychology 

Philosophy 



RITA D. LEONE 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



CAROLE A. LEONG 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



MICHELLE A. LESLIE 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



ANN M. LETTENBERGER 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



328 / Seniors 



NANCY LETTINI 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



PAMELA LEUNG 


LINDA ANN LEVASSEUR 


PAUL E. LEWIS 


School of Nursing 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


BS Nursing 


AB English 


BS Biology 



CYNTHIA M. LICCIARDELLO 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 







SUSAN L LIFVENDAHL 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Computer Science 



ELLEN S. LIGHTMAN 

School of Education 

AB Elem-Special Education 



JOSEPHINE P. LIMJUCO 

School of Education 
AB Human Development 



ALVIN H. LIN 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



MONICA W.LIN 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 





STEVEN R. LIPIN 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



GENEVIEVE LIQUORI 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 




PETER E. LITTLE 


MARKJ.UTTLEHALE 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


AB Political 


BS Biology 


Science 


Pre-Medical 




Sue Towey 



If the Quad Could Talk 



"I've seen it all. Since the four buildings 
that surround me were constructed, I have 
been one of the best known landmarks on 
campus. As the years have gone by, I've 
seen thousands of students come and go. 
Hundreds passed through me each day. I 
was the hub of social activity during the 
week. People were always meeting "in the 
quad". I remembered the 'all-boys' ' days, 
the conservative suits and ties that were 
daily attire. There were the World War II 
days when uniforms of army grey, marine 
green and navy blue were commonplace. 
As the '50's came and went, a new look 
emerged . . , girls were now crossing my 
brick pathways. I remember the flower- 
child days of the '60's and the mini-skirts 
and bell-bottomed pants of the 70's. But, 
through it all were the die-hard preps, refus- 
ing to surrender their 'pink and greens' for 
the wild fashion fads. As the '80's arrived, so 



did the renewal of the 'preppie look'. I've 
seen many changes on this campus. As it 
has grown, the diversity of students has also 
grown. In the '80's, students have let their 
own individual characteristics shine. They 
have 'dared to be different'. 

With the completion of the Tip O'Neill Li- 
brary, the crowd-gathering events no 
longer took place between the four Gothic 
buildings. But, on warm, sunny days, stu- 
dents flocked not only to the O'Neill plaza, 
but also to me. No matter how many new 
buildings were added students would al- 
ways return to me. Since the days when 
there was nothing here but grass and trees I 
watched. I knew that would always be a 
special spot in the heart of every Eagle 
Alumni because I was the center of the Uni- 
versity. It was nice to know my benches 
would never gather dust." 

— Roberta Blaz 



Seniors / 329 



DAVID M. LIVINGSTON 


ANTHONY J. LOCHIATTO 


MILDRED LOCKWOOD 


KATHLEEN M. LONG 


JOHN F. LOONEY 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


School of Education 


School of Management 


BS Marketing 


BS Biology 


AB Elementary Education 


AB Secondary Education 


BS Marketing 




Pre-Medical 




Spanish 


Human Resource Management 




ROBERT! LOONEY 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 



JOSE R. LOPEZ DE VICTORIA 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



CORINNE JANETTE LOUPIAC 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Philosophy 



ELIZABETH M. LOWE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 



MARK X. LOWNEY 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 




PAULT.LUBIAK 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



THERESA LUCA 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Theology 



MONICA M. LUCIANA 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



CYNTHIA LUCKART 

Arts & Sciences 
BS Political Science 



JOCELYN M. LUNA 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 




RONALD F. LUONGO 
Arts & Sciences 
BS Geophysics 



ALLISON LYNCH 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



KATHLEEN LYNCH 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



PATRICIA D. LYNCH 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 

Economics 



GRACE A. LYU 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Fine Arts 



330 / Seniors 



Ft. Lauderdale 



We Just had to go. Spring Break was the vacation of the 
year and Ft. Lauderdale was the spring break capital, 

where millions of college students united for one thing — 
FUNI 

We did make it to Ft. Lauderdale sophomore year, but we 
prefer to classify that as a learning experience. We were 
even more ready this particular year, We were juniors living 
off campus, so we were mature women of the world. We 
were going back to Ft. Lauderdale and we would drive 
ourselves down. Why pay an airline pilot? We would be our 
own pilots. 

On March 1, we left for Ft, Lauderdale — thirty short hours 
away. We gathered gas money and kept it in a BC cup. This 
cup was sacred — only to be touched when buying gas, We 
"cruised" down with no problems, and soon we were settled 
In our "deluxe" hotel. Our week in Florida was fantastic, full of 
sun, fun and excitement, but soon it was time to return our 
fatigued yet bronzed bodies back to Boston. We got out the 
BC cup, packed the car, and were on our way. Everything 
seemed fine when suddenly I heard a thud. Our BC cup was 
in the middle of the road and all our money was "blowin' in 
the wind," You never saw four girls move so gulck, and we 
were able to get all our money back. 

This slight horror made us thirsty so we kept our eyes open 
for a store. My roommate must have been very thirsty, be- 
cause she cut off two lanes of traffic to get to the store. 
Unfortunately, she didn't turn fast enough and a car crashed 
in behind us. No damage was done, but the other car con- 
tained four senior citizens who insisted on calling the police. 
A policeman finally came, and he wanted to give us a 
ticket, Could you believe it, just for cutting off two lanes. Well 
we took care of that by pouring on our female emotions, with 
my roommate clinching it by crying hysterically. (This was her 
privilege since it was her car.) We escaped the ticket, got 
our soda, and moved on. 



It seemed to take forever to get out of Florida, but we did 
make it back to Boston, and back to the reality of our apart- 
ment, where we had no electricity because the landlord 
was "experimenting". However, the fact remains that we did 
make It. We got our tans and had our fun. We had con- 
quered the quest. 

— Mary Parry 





Andy Ryan 




LOU-ZEN MA 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



PAULJ.MACDONALD 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



SUSAN M. MACGILLIVRAY 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



KATHLEEN M. MACRINA 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Pre-Medical 

Biology 



DIANE E. MACYS 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 




GREGORY CMADDALENI 

Arts & Sciences 

AB French 

Economics 



CHRISTOPHER MADDALONE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 



MICHELLE M. MADEY 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Mathematics 



LEWIS ALLEN MADLEY 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 



DEBORAH MAGNOTTA 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 



Seniors / 331 



LINDA M.MAGUIRE 
School of Education 
AB Middle Education 



RORY MAGUIRE 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



TERESA M. MAGUIRE 

School of Education 

AB Elementary Education 



TOBIN MAGUIRE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



MARYJ.MAHER 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



&£&?! 




DAVID B.MAHLER 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 



MARY K. MAHONY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Economics 

History 



JOANN C. MALONE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Sociology 



BRIAN E. MAHONEY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Computer Science 



FRANCIS C. MAHONEY 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



KAREN MAHONEY 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



PATRICIA L MAHONEY 

School of Education 

AB Elem-Special Education 




ARLENE M. MAILLET 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 



SUZANNE L. MAITLAND 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



MARIA MALOLEPSZY 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



DONNA M. MALONE 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 





Ml* 



ANDREW J. MALONEY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 



CAROL-ANN M. MALONEY 

School of Education 
AB Elem-Special Education 



JOHN J. MALONEY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 



SANDRA D. MANASSA 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



332 / Seniors 




STEPHEN M. MANCINI 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 



JUDIANN R. MANCUSCO 

School of Education 
AB Human Development 




LIANA M. MANCUSO 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



GAYLE M. MANGANELLO 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Mathematics 




RJ McMahon 



Vandalism at its Prime 



A letter to the Editor: 

I looked at the brand new educational 
structure, the Tip O'Neill Jr. Library, and I 
wondered if it would retain it's modern fa- 
cade. I wondered If it would remain as 
clean and spotless in the future as It looked 
to me then. Or would it be subject to this 
University's greatest eyesore, vandalism. 
Now when I speak of vandalism, I am not 
referring to the spray paint on the dustbowl, 
nor to graffitti in the bathrooms. In fact, 
when I speak of vandalism, I am not refer- 
ring to it as it is commonly viewed, as sense- 
less destruction of property. Rather, I am 
speaking of a greater form of vandalism 
which was commonly accepted on this 
campus. 

This vandalism not only ruined the aes- 
thetic beauty of this lovely campus, it also 
created more work for those who had to 
clean up this refuse. This Vandalism' to 



which I refer was the posting of signs, letters, 
pamphlets etc. on the building doors and 
walls of our educational facilities which 
promoted various groups and events. This 
promotional activity was supposed to seive 
a purpose for those who were perceptive 
on campus, but I felt that the aesthetic evils 
far outweighed the benefits. Clearly these 
signs diminished the beauty of the campus 
yet they were openly accepted and al- 
lowed to exist. 

As I looked at the O'Neill Library, I won- 
dered if this vandalism would spreod to its 
doors, walls and hallways. Would this al- 
ways remain the tastefully adorned site that 
was so powerful in its austerity? Or would it's 
clear glass doorways lose their importance 
as an entrance to tradition and become 
another billboard for campus promotions? 
Only the future could say . . . 

— MBL 




NANCY M. MANGANO 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 



DEBRA M. MANNING 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



MARYU.MANNLE 

School of Education 

AB Human Development 



WILLIAM J. MARCINKIEWICZ 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



MICHAEL V.MARCONI 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 




GREGORY MARENGHI 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



CARLA L. MARIN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



ANNE MARINACCIO 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Mathematics 

Computer Science 



LORRAINE C.MARINO 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 



ELIZABETH MARKEY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Theology 

Economics 



Seniors / 333 



JAMES M.MARNER 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Mathematics 

Computer Science 



ROBERT J. MARREN 

School of Management 

BS Finance 

Marketing 



JOSEPH N. MARROCCO 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



CAROL D. MARROQUIN 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



SARAH I. MARSHALL 
School of Management 
: BS Computer Science 




DAVE MARTIN 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



ELLEN L. MARTIN 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Chemistry 



GREGORY F. MARTIN 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Pre-Medical 

Economics 



LAURIE A. MARTINS 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 



ROSANNE M. MASCOLO 

School of Education 
AB Human Development 




Right out of Rockwell 



SCENE: December 
21, a couple shopping 
in Boston, each carried 
a full shopping bag. 
Appeared to be a first 
date. Snow was lightly 
falling. As they walked 
along, the young man 
noticed an empty horse drawn carriage at the next comer. 
How could he resist? "Excuse me, sir. You busy?" 

"No.", replied the driver, with a slight Irish accent. "My 
friend and I were just waiting for a couple like you to come 
along. Would seem a shame to let a beautiful horse like this 
be idle on a day like today. Let me help you up here, young 
lady." As she handed him her bag and took his hand, the 
young man walked over to a gentleman selling roses. 

'Til take one, please. Tell ya what, why don't you just make 
It an even dozen." 
"A dozen It is, sirll" 

He headed back to the carriage and handed her the 
roses. As she cradled them in her arm, she gave him a subtle 
peck on the cheek. Her smile said it all. 
"Anywhere special, folks?" 
"How 'bout a nice long stroll around the city?" 
"A stroll around the city it is!" Norman Rockwell couldn't 
have wished for a more perfect scene. 

— R.J. McMahon and Berta Blaz 



^ 

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S^tim) 




f 













Makis latridis 




KATHRYN MASLEY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 




TANYA M. MASON 

School of Education 

AB Elem-Special Education 



334 / Seniors 



JOSEPH A. MASSARO 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Sociology 



JOSEPH M, MASSARO 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Mathematics 



PAULA A. MASTRORILLI 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



NICHOLAS A. MATTIELLO 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



PATRICE A. MATYAS 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Mathematics 




SUSAN A. MAURO 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



CHRISTOPHER J. MAYNARD 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 



JEROME A. MAZZIOTTA 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 

Marketing 



ROBERT H.MCANDREW 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



KATHLEEN T. MCAULIFFE 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 




JOHN MCCABE 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



CAROLYN C. MCCAHILL 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



RICHARD M. MCCANN 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Chemistry 

Pre-Medical 



DELENDERA.MCCANTS 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Psychology 

Pre-Medical 



BRIAN D. MCCARTHY 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 




EILEEN M. MCCARTHY 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



KAREN E. MCCARTHY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Sociology 



KATHERINE M. MCCARTHY 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



MARIE E. MCCARTHY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Spanish 



MARK W. MCCARTHY 

School of Education 

AB History 



Seniors / 335 




J i4 





Mdik 



PAUL MCCARTHY 


SARA C MCCARTHY 


SEAN M. MCCARTHY 


TIMOTHY J. MCCARTHY 


ERIC L MCCARTNEY 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


B.S. Physics 


AB English 


AB English 


BS Finance 
Marketing 


AB Economics 




WILLIAM J. MCCARTY 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



JAMESJ.MCCAULEY 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



LAURA P. MCCAULEY 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Computer Science 



LISA A. MCCLEERY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



JULIE M. MCCUE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 




MARK A. MCCULLAGH 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 



GERARD F. MCDERMOTT 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



MICHAEL C. MCDERMOTT 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Political Science 

Economics 



LINDA MCDONALD 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



MICHAEL D. MCDONALD 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 




EILEEN M. MCDONNELL 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



MEDEA MCEVOY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Art History 



JAY P. MCFARLAND 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



WILLIAM C. MCGARRAHAN 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Speech Communication 



DANIEL J. MCGILLIVRAY 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 

Accounting 



336 / Seniors 







CORNELIUS J. MCGINN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Geology 

Pre-Medical 



COLLEEN M. MCGINTY 

School of Education 

AB Human Development 




THOMAS M. MCGOWAN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



KATHLEEN C. MCGRATH 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 




PATRICIA A. MCHALE 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



ANNE E. MCHUGH 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 




PATRICIA MARY MCHUGH 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 



MAUREEN A. MCINNIS 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



THOMAS MCGLAUGHLIN 

School of Management 

BS Management 



JEANNE MCGOWAN 

Arts and Sciences 

AB Psychology 



MICHAEL A. MCGOWAN 
Arts & Scinces 
AB Economics 




Frank Shea 



Trivial Pursuits 



Fade up. 

Pan right, slowly, slowly, good. 

Now stop. 

Roll credits. 

And fade up music. 
Narrator: The scene, an average apart- 
ment on Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, 
MA, complete with Pay windows and 
drafts. Two girls sit around the apartment 
with nothing to do on a Plustery Sunday af- 
ternoon. (It couldn't Pe Friday or Saturday 
night you see, there's always something to 
do then, too much usually.) Bored to the 
point of nearly bursting into tears they de- 
cide to play Trivial Pursuit. 
Cue "Twilight Zone" music. And fade mu- 
sic, fade to black. 

OK, everybody ready? We're coming 
back. Fade up, slowly. Good. 
Lisa: You mean to tell me you don't know 
what color eyes a scallop has? Why every- 
one knows what color eyes scallops have. 
You must have seen one? 
Tara: No I never saw one. 
Lisa: They're this beautiful blue-green you 
should see them they're gorgeous! 
Tara: How would I know? The only kinds of 
scallops we have in New Jersey are the 
white smelly kind with two flat ends, Where 
have you ever seen a scallop anyway? 
Lisa: Oh, my parents took me to Bermuda 
one year. They are really neat, They have 
these aqua-blue green eyes. Well, you 
missed, my turn. 



Tara: Oh, you'll never get this one. How 
many kinds of screw drivers does Stanley 
make? 
Lisa: Eight 

Tara: How did you know that? 
Lisa: I don't know. Come on I want a "Lives 
and Times" auestion now. 
Add wave. 
Fade out scene one. 
Fade up dream seauence. 
Fade audio up and down. 
Noooooooooo , . , leave me alone. I don't 
want to play any more. Um. Wait I know that 
one , . . left, no right, no left ahhhhhhh. Help 
... I got it blue-green. (Ha! I'd heard that 
one before.) Marilyn Monroe, John F. Ken- 
nedy, Aristotle Onassis, Jacquline Kennedy, 
Marilyn Monroe, Osh Kosh, Fanieul Hall, 
John F. Kennedy, Paint by numbers, darn I 
know that one, um I'll just say Marilyn 
Monroe and John F, Kennedy that's always 
good 

Fade up apartment shot, 
Fade out audio. 
Fade up narrator. 

Narrator: Trivial Pursuit, a game designed to 
entertain has become an overpowering 
demon. Many cannot make it through the 
day without a fix. They carry pocket sized 
cards in their pockets for quick pick me ups. 
There is no escape in sight. 
Cue Twilight Zone music. 
Fade to black. 
Fade audio. 
And cut. Nice job everybody. 



Seniors / 337 



TARA A. MCKENZIE 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 



ANNET. MCKIERNAN 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



THOMAS S. MCKITTRICK 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



JULIE M. MCLAUGHLIN 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



LISA MARIE MCLAUGHLIN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 

French 




SALLY J. MCLAUGHLIN 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 

Economics 



MAUREEN L. MCLELLAN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



ELIZABETH F. MCLEOD 

School of Education 

AB English 



JOHN MCMATTON 

School of Management 

BS Business Administration 



MARIANNE E. MCMANAMA 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Economics 




NANCY E. MCMANUS 
Arts & Sciences 

AB English 
Speech Theater 



THOMAS H.MCMORRAN 

School of Education 

AB Secondary Education 

English 



MARYC.MCMULLIN 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



BRYAN MCNALLY 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



DONNA M. MCNAMARA 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 





KATHLEEN A. MCNAMARA 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



MARC MCNAMARA 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



MARY E. MCNANEY 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



PAULINE B. MCNEIL 

School of Education 

AB Spanish 



MAUREEN A. MCNICHOLL 

School of Education 
AB Human Development 



338 / Seniors 




Doug Flutie ... up close and personal 



When one 
heard the 
name of 
"Doug Flutie" 
thoughts of 
quick scram- 
bling and 
miracle 
fourth- 
quarter passes came to mind. The word "magic" 
became commonplace and the numbers five, 
nine and three-quarters become of utmost impor- 
tance, Because of his praise as a quarterback on 
the gridiron, people tended to forget that, like the 
rest of us, he was also a BC student, One early 
Thursday morning after his senior picture was 
taken, we talked "student to student". 

In 1981, Doug was a Natick High School senior. It 
was then that he made two very important deci- 
sions, He had lettered In three varsity sports: foot- 
ball, basketball and baseball and wanted to play 
one in college, As far as colleges, he was in- 
terested in the University of New Hampshire, Brown 
and Boston College, Though his build was more 
suited for baseball and his Interests more in bas- 
ketball, football was the sport in which he excelled 
In, So, when BC offered him a football scholarship, 
the decision was made, 

Much has changed at BC because of Doug 
Flutie and that decision. However, when asked 
how he felt BC had changed, he commented on 
the various ways the university had grown. He also 
mentioned that he was giad to see the emphasis 
on the athletic programs. He saw It as a positive 
focus. Though we put ourselves on the map, he 
didn't see BC becoming a "football" school, He 
compared the future of BC football to the image 
that one associated with Notre Dame: and out- 
standing university with a traditionally strong foot- 
ball team, 

Doug was instrumental in shaping our "strong 
football team". As a result, his name was a house- 
hold word in football circles and his picture made 
the cover of most major sports magazines, includ- 
ing the likes of Sports Illustrated and Sport. How 
did he handle this recognition? He admitted that, 
although he liked it, it could be awkward. He 
didn't like to call attention to himself. Basically, he 
wanted to be known as a BC student rather than 
an Ali-American football player. 

Like many kids at BC, Doug had a sibling here. 
His brother, Darren, was a freshman in 1984-85. He 
enjoyed having him on campus although they 
didn't spend much time together. He felt like the 
typical big brother, keeping an eye on him, help- 
ing him out if he could. As far as football went, he 
enjoyed having him on the team. It made the 
game more meaningful and personal. He was 
concerned about Darren being "Doug Flutie's lit- 
tle brother", but he believed that they were differ- 
ent individuals and it wouldn't hinder Darren in any 
way. Who knew? Maybe one day, Doug would 
return to BC, walk through the dustbowl and have 
heads turn again. Only, he just might hear, "Hey, 
there goes Darren Flutie's big brother." 

In retrospect, how did Doug feel about his ca- 
reer at BC? "I came to Boston College expecting a 
lot less out of football. I thought I'd be sitting on the 
bench for four years, taking advantage of the 
scholarship and the education it would provide, I 
never expected things to tum out the way they did, 
I'm just thankful I've been able to give the university 
something in return." 

— Roberta Biaz 




Sue Towey 



Seniors / 339 



KAREN M. MCNULTY 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 



MARGARET G. MCPHERSON 

School of Education 

AB Human Development 



SUSAN M. MCPHERSON 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 



JOANNE M. MCQUAID 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 

Speech Communication 



MONICA M. MCQUAID 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 




PAMELA V. MCVEY 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



RAMEZ MECATTAF 

School of Management 

BS Management 



MARIA T.MEDUA 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Spanish 



NEILMEDUGNO 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



NICHOLAS H. MEDUGNO 

Arts & Sciences 

BS. Biology 

Pre-Medical 

Chemistry 




The Price of Fame 



Mom always warned me not to 
accept rides from strangers and 
to always respect my elders. But 
she never warned me about the 
cost of a college education. 

Nevertheless, students had to 
face it and each year we all got 
the lovely maroon and gold BC 
bill that listed the exorbitant cost 
of another semester at an institute 
of higher learning. 

It hit some of us harder than 
others but the reality behind those 
increases in Board and Tuition 
was a 'Ihats life" enlightenment. 
The bottom line to this reality was 
the fact that we all chose to 
come here. And so, some way or 
another, we eventually paid that 
staggering, eye opening price 
for fame. 

— Tania Zielinski 



financial 

N r 'V$ 
v 







J 






QoBton (College 
(Sraouat* Financial Art 

jliuitructinn iBiuik fij) 



LL 



Geoff Why 



Mill 





THERESA M. MEEHAN 

School of Education 

AB Elementary Education 




HELEN P. MEHLING 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 



340 / Seniors 



THOMAS M. MEISENBACHER 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



LEO M. MELANSON 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 

Speech Communication 



SOFIA MELLEKAS 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



MARK J. MENDOLLA 

ARTS &. Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 



DOMENIC PETER MERCURI 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 




TRACEYA.MERRITT 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



ROBERT EDWARD MEYJES 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



PATRICIA M. MICHALSKI 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



BETH E. MICHEL 

School of Education 

AB Elementary Education 

Mathematics 



PAUL D. MIGNINI 

School of Management 

BS Finance 




KRISTIN A. MILLER 

School of Education 

AB Human Development 



ROBERT K.MILLER 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



SUZANNE J. MILLIGAN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



KATHLEEN D. MILLS 

School of Education 

AB Human Development 



BRUCE R. MILTON 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 





CHERYL A. MINA 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 

Accounting 



ROBINJ.MINEMIER 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



SHARON L MINER 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Spanish 



WALTER F. MIS 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



JAMES E. MISKIS 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 



Seniors / 341 



MARK MISKOVSKY 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Philosophy 



JAMES RAYMOND MITCHELL 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



JASON S. MITCHELL 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 



MARY D. MITCHELL 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Germanic Studies 



RODERICK A. MITCHELL 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 




MICHAEL I. MITSUKAWA 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Theology 



GINAMIX 

School of Education 

AB Severe Special Needs 



ANNE-USE MOE 
School of Education 
AB Early Childhood 



MAUREEN L. MOISSON 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Studio Art 



VICTOR P. MOKARRY 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 




JOSEPH A. MOLINA 
Arts & Sciences 

AB History 
Political Science 



DEBRAA.MOLL 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Mathematics 

Philosophy 



JOHN H. MOLLOY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 



REGINA F. MONGILLO 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



REGINA MONTANE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 




BENJAMIN P. MONTENEGRO 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



KATHLEEN M. MOODY 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 



PHILIP P. MOONEY 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Chemistry 

Pre-Medical 



CAROL H.MOORE 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



JAMES M.MOORE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 

Philosophy 



342 / Seniors 



Peter Klidaras 



Resident Assistants 



From Duchense to Gonzaga to Mods, 
they were an Important part of the Boston 
College community. They let you In to your 
room when you locked yourself out. They 
organized socials (usually centered on 
some form of eating whether it was sundaes 
or subs). They banged on your door when 
there was a fire alarm in the wee hours of 
the morning to make sure you didn't burn to 
death. Resident Assistants. They were cho- 
sen from a large pool of applicants. They 
went thru a series of interviews and were 
selected as the most responsible, or- 
ganized trustworthy, and weil-rounded in- 
dividuals the university had to offer. Sure, it 
had It's benefits but they sacrificed a great 
deal for our benefits, Many Thursday nights 
at the Rat were Thursday nights on duty, 
Many Friday night parties were missed, 
Many Saturday night football games were 
watched on TV, Those were Just the general 



things. But it was a lot harder than non-RA's 
can Imagine, No R.A, enjoyed taking the 
beer from the underaged student. No R.A. 
liked breaking up a party after the third 
warning knowing that they were being 
cursed at by the departing guests. No R.A, 
enjoyed writing up a drunken student who 
had caused problems, No R.A. enjoyed be- 
ing the bad guy. But it was their job. It was a 
responsibility they had been willing to un- 
dertake to ensure the safety and well-being 
of Boston College students. But they weren't 
Just figures of authority. They were friends we 
turned to for advise, fun, laughs and even a 
drink now and then (off duty, of coursell) 
R.A.'s who could balance it all, school, the 
responsibilities of the position and the 
friendships with the residents of their hall, or 
dorm successfully, were looked on with 
great respect by peers, residents and ad- 
ministration alike. 



PATRICE MOORE 

School of Management 

BS Management 



TERRENCE O. MOOREHEAD 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Economics 

Speech Communication 




LAURIE L. MORAN 

School of Education 

AB Elem-Special 

Education 



THOMAS J. MORAN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Economics 

Philosophy 




RICHARD A. MOREAU 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Mathematics 



JANET E.MORGAN 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



MARTHA A. MORKAN 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 



JOHN F. MORLEY 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



ANTHONY MOROSE 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 




PATRICIA J. MORRISSY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Sociology 



MELISSA R. MORTON 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



CLAUDIA M. MOSQUERA 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



CORNELIUS P. MOYNIHAN 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



JAMES G.MROZ 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 

History 



Seniors / 343 



KERRY A. MULCAHY 


MATTHEW J. MULLANEY 


JOSEPH L. MULLEN 


ANDREA J. MULLIN 


LACEY ANN MULLOWNEY 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


BS Marketing 


AB Economics 


BS Accounting 


AB History 


AB Speech Communication 




Philosophy 




Philosophy 


Political Science 




CHRISTOPHER P. MULLOY 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 



THOMAS C.MULRY 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



ROBERT M. MUNGOVAN 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Physics 

Pre-Medical 



DANIEL E.MURNER 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 



CATHERINE M. MURPHY 

Arts & Sciences 
BS Pre-Medical Biology 




ELIZABETH A. MURPHY 

School of Education 

AB Human Development 



GERALDINE MURPHY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



JOSEPH G. MURPHY 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



MAUREEN A. MURPHY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 



MAUREEN D. MURPHY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Psychology 

Philosophy 




MEGIN R. MURPHY 

School of Education 

AB Human Devleopment 



RICHARD JAMES MURPHY 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



JOAN MURRAY 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 



KATHLEEN MURRAY 

Arts &. Sciences 

AB English 



MARY E. MURRAY 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



344 / Seniors 




\*± 





SEAN R. MURRAY 

School of Management 

BS Human Resource 

Management 



ROSS A. MUSCATO 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



DONALD R. MUSSELMAN 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 

Accounting 



JOHN W. NAGLE 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



DOUGLAS R. NANI 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 




SANDRA ANN NASCA 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 



BARBARA NASSANEY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Computer Science 

French 




THOMAS A. NATAL 

School of Management 

BS Computer 

Science 



CAROLYN P. NEE 

School of Education 

AB Elem-Special 

Education 




MARGARET A. NEESER 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



CHRISTINE A. NELSON 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 



fW* 




Deirdre Reidy 



Two's Company 



"He didn't." 

"He did!" 

"No way!" 

"Yes!" 

"Oh, God tell me all about it!" 

"Can I borrow your mousse?" 

"Sure g'head." 

"Thanks." 

"Listen I'm like in a super hurry so I'm going 
to have to leave the dishes but I'll do them 
when 1 come home I promise," 

"Well if you pay 41.92 for the telephone 
and 8.50 for the gas, I'll buy the ballettickets 
and we'll be even." 

"Eeeekl How come I always see the 
cockroaches and you never do!???" 

"I'm out of mousse I" 

"If you cook Mondays I'll cook Wednes- 
days and the rest of the week we'll wing it." 

"We got another post card from Lisa!" 

"Do you like Miraclewhip or what?" 

"How come her car is nicer than mine?" 

"I don't have the 8.50 let alone the 41 .92." 

"RINGGGGGGGGGGG" 

"Hello?" 

"Hello..." 

"Oh, hi Peter just a minute, I'll get Teresa. 
It's for you." 

"Did you want to get a Christmas tree?" 

"I hope you don't mind but I'm not going 
to be able to cook this Monday." 

"I'll do the dishes when I come home, I 
promise." 

"We don't have anything to decorate it 
with." 



"Hey where 'd ya get this?" 

"Can I borrow it?" 

"RINGGGGGGGGG" 

"Hello?" 

"Hello ..." 

"Hi, Peter, just a second" 

Click, click . . . click, click, "Hey did you 
ever pay the telephone bill?" 

"Uhhhh ..." 

"We could cut out little snow flakes for it." 

"Hey, I know how to do that I'm an ed 
major." 

"This is really my first tree. Ya know, like not 
my parents and all." 

"Yeah, me too." 

"It's not half bad." 

"Are you kidding that's the most beautiful 
tree I've ever seen." 

"RINGGGGGGGG" 

"I'm not going to get it. It's Peter, I know it's 
Peter." 

"RINGGGGGGGGGG" 

"It's for her. It's always for her. If not it's 
yearbook and either way I don't care." 

"RINGGGGGGGGGG" 

"I'll get it." 

"Hello?" 

"Hello . . . this is Peter is Tara there?" 

"Oh, yeah, hold on." 

"HeyTara, it's Peter" 

"Yeah so?" 

"Not mine dummy, yours. That guy you 
met last summer? 

"Peter Luiks? No way!" 



Seniors / 345 



NANCY A. NEPPL 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



PETER F. NERONHA 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 



HILANDIA NEUTA 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Psychology 

Speech Communication 



KATHLEEN M. NEVILLE 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



MONICA D. NEVILLE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Philosophy 

English 




JAMES NG 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



HUONG THU NGUYEN 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



LYNNE C. NICHOLAS 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



MICHAEL R. NICHOLS 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



HEATHER A. NICHOLSON 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 




SHERI L. NICKERSON 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 




MARTA M. NIGOHOSIAN 
School of Education 
AB Middle Education 



From Polo to Punk 



He jovially embraced his 
friend, beer from his plastic cup 
spilling all over his mudstained 
Rugger shirt and onto his multicol- 
ored patchwork patterned tail- 
gate shorts , . . 

She came to the party late for 
she had spilled makeup all over 
her new Bennetton sweater. 
Sadly, she noted that her over- 
sized Girbaud Francois jeans 
seemed to clash with her yellow 
Forenza sweater ... she hoped 
he wasn't wearing his Izod. 

He saw her suddenly, the glow 
from her neon green socks clash- 
ing with her black jeans. One 
geometric earring dangled from 
her right ear. 

She ran to meet him and he 
hugged her warmly while she dis- 
entangled her earring from the 
alligator on his sweater. . . 

— Tania Zielinski 




Theresa Puleo 



346 / Seniors 




V 




A^Mdik 



MARY G.NOBLE 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



ANDREA E. NOLAN 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



JOSEPH R. NOLAN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



BONNIE J. NOUN 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



RICARDO NOLTENIUS 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 




^P 





JOYCE K.NOONAN 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 



RICHARD J. NOONAN 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



LISA M. NOONE 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



MAURA L. NOONE 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 



DEBORAH NORTHGRAVES 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 




ANN MARIE NORTON 

School of Education 

AB Elem-Special Education 



AUDREY NORTON 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



PHILIP A. NOTIS 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



PETERJ.NOVOTNEY 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



ANNMARIE NOWISZEWSKI 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 




TONI E. NUCCIO 

School of Education 

AB Human Development 



LISAA.NUCCITELLI 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



MARIE OATES 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



KATHERINE R. OBOYLE 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



ANDREW M. O'BRIEN 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



Seniors / 347 



ANNE M. O'BRIEN 


CATHERINE J. O'BRIEN 


KATHLEEN M. O'BRIEN 


LINDA MARIE O'BRIEN 


ROBERT E. O'BRIEN 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Management 


AB Political Science 


AB Political Science 


BS Chemistry 


BS Accounting 


BS Marketing 


English 




Pre- Dental 








KERRY A. O'CONNELL 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 



MAUREEN A. O'CONNELL 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



SHAWN C. O'CONNELL 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



STEPHEN P. O'CONNELL 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



JAMES P. O'CONNOR 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 




JOSEPH R. O'CONNOR 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech 

Theater 



MARK FRANCIS O'CONNOR 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



MARY J. O'CONNOR 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



PATRICK E. O'CONNOR 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



ALAINE O'DELL 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Philosophy 




HELEN M. O'DONNELL 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



THOMAS F. O'DONNELL 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 

History 



MARY K. O'DONOGHUE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 

Philosophy 



ERIN D. O'DRISCOLL 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Chemistry 



NIAMH OTLAHERTY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 

Philosophy 



348 / Seniors 



PAUL D. OGLISHEN 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Chemistry 

Pre-Medical 



HARRYJ.O'GRINC 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



MARY BETH OGULEWICZ 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 



CHRISTOPHER K. O'HARA 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



RACHEL F. OHARA 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 




THOMAS R. O'KANE 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 

Economics 



DANIEL T.O'KEEFE 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Mathematics 

Computer Science 



ELIZABETH A. OKEEFE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 

English 



JOHN F. O'LEARY 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



MUAREEN OLEARY 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 




JOHN C. OLIVEIRA 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



DOLORES A. OLIVOLO 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 





JAMES R. OLSON 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



CHRISTOPHER B. O'MALLEY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 



Peter Hillenbrand 



Time's a Wasting 



So much of an ordinary day went to 
waste. In some classes it was voluntary. In 
other cases it just happened. Voluntary 
wastes included things like sitting in the caf- 
eteria for another twenty minutes, playing 
video games, calling an old friend (that 
was sure to kill at least a half hour), or just 
reading the paper. Afterall, it was always 
easier to start studying at hour or half-hour 
intervals. If it was 7:10 you'd wait til 7:30, but 
why? No, the question was, why not? Invol- 
untary time wasters were things that you 
had little or no control over. Waiting for the 
elevator, waiting for a bus or waiting in any 
line were involuntary time wasters. 

Well, no matter what, everybody got 
around to studying eventually. There was 
the classically defined bookworm. This was 
the studier who never allowed himself any 
free time. God forbid that he should ever 
pull himself away from the books at the end 



of a weeknight much less to go out on the 
weekend. Then there was the "Boston Col- 
lege Converted Bookworm". He knew when 
enough was enough. He studied hard but 
knew when to play. He even managed to fit 
in a weeknight excursion now and then. 
Then there was the "I'll get my work done 
when it's due" studier. Work was done when 
it had to be done and only when it had to 
be done. These were the people at M.A.'s 
four out of seven nights a week. And then, 
there was the "blow-off" studier. He rarely 
attended class, (he got the notes from some 
sucker who went to class everyday). His 
work was delayed indefinitely and assign- 
ments were often handed in late. 

Every Boston College student was some- 
where in that catagorization. Much time 
was wasted but sooner or later it did get 
done. 

— Berta Blaz and R.J. McMahon 



Seniors / 349 



TERRANCE J. O'MALLEY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Philosophy 

History 



NORTON F. O'MEARA 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



ELIZABETH M. O'NEIL 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



MICHAEL R. O'NEIL 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



JOSEPH P. O'NEILL 

School of Management 

BS Finance 

Accounting 




LAUREEN P. ONEILL 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



MICHAEL F. O'NEILL 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



EILEEN M.ORIE 

School of Management 

BS Economics 



YVETTE ORTIZ 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



STEPHEN P. ORZELL 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 




1 ELIZABETH OSBORNE 


PATRICIA M. OSTERHOUT 


LORI A. OSTIGUY 


SUSAN M. OSTROWSKI 


JILLO'SULLIVAN 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


AB Psychology 


AB Philosophy 
English 


AB Speech Communication 


AB Economics 


AB Severe Special Needs 




DONNA L. OTOOLE 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



THOMAS P. OTOOLE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



JEFFREY P. OTTERBEIN 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



THERESE A. PACE 

School of Education 

AB Elementary Education 



ANDREW M. PADELLARO 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 

History 



350 / Seniors 



t 



HILARIE PAGE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



EFFIE PAIKOS 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 

Economics 



LEONARD PALMER 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



MARIA L. PALMEROLA 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



EDUARDO M. PALMIERI 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Sociology 




DENISE PAMPENA 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 



THOMAS H. PANACCIONE 

School of Management 

BS Finance 




LYNN ELAINE PANAGAKOS 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



PAUL GEORGE PANARIELLO 

School of Management 

BS Computer 

Science 




JULIANNE PAOLINO 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



JANE G. PAPADEMETRIOU 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 




Geoff Why 



Editor's Priveledge 



Once upon a time in an office 
way underground a small group of 
elves were putting together a year- 
book (without much help from the 
rest of the elf population who were 
very apathetic}. They had a few 
problems as they worked on the 
book and sent this letter to the pub- 
lisher. 

Dear Mr. Printer: 

I thought I'd sent page fourty-four, 
But I just found it on the floor. 
It is enclosed with ninety-eight 
I'm sorry it's a month too late. 

I said I'd send the rest myself. 
These ten were lying on a shelf. 
The pages I sent as six and seven 
I'd like to send as ten and eleven. 
That is unless they're already done 



in that case make it ninety-one 

Please send page twelve and thir- 
teen back, 

I should have made those two girls' 
track. 

Instead I sent girls volleyball 

and that can't go in there at all. 

I had it planned wrong that's the 
thing 

I plumb forgot it came in, "Spring". 

I'm sorry all our stuff was late, 

Could that affect delivery date? 

Love, 
The Editor 

The above poem has been re- 
printed due to popular demand 
(mine) and extreme similarity to 
this production year. 



Seniors / 351 




DANIEL G. PAPADOPOULOS 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Pre-Medical 

Psychology 




DAVID W. PAQUETTE 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Dental 



CONSTANTINE PARKER 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Studio Art 



6:59 AM 



The clock radio read 6:59 AM. 
The radio went off . . . "Boy, it's a 
nasty one out there. The tempera- 
ture will be in the thirties today 
with rain on and off, heavy at 
times." 

You slammed the "off" button. 
"God, isn't it hard enough to get 
up for a 9:00 A.M. class without 
hearing a forecast like that??" 

Hearing the rain on your roof, 
you got up for a peek out the win- 
dow, 

"Yup, it's raining." 

The sight of the muddy puddle 
just outside your door and the 
loud clash of thunder sent you fly- 
ing back into bed, covers pulled 
up over your head . . . just ten 
moreminuteslll 

You rolled over and glanced 
at the clock. It now read 8:27. Fif- 
teen minutes later you were out 
the door. Just what you needed 
to wake you up . . . being 
drenched by freezing rain. 



Six fifty-nine is the 
worst time of day! 



\r 




Staff photo 




KATHLEEN M. PARKS 

School of Education 

AB Human Development 



MARY M. PARRY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Commnication 



VICTORIA A. PAVLICK 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



1 



GEORGE A. PAVLOV 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 





MARY ANN PEARSON 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



NANCY E. PEARSON 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



LYNN M. PELLETIER 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



RICHARD S. PENA 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



SUSAN A. PENDERS 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



352 / Seniors 



RICHARD A. PENEZIC 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



BRENDA PEPE 

Evening College 

AB Computer Science 



MARIA H.PERDOMO 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



ROLANDO A. PEREA 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



ELIZABETH NANCY PEREZ 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 




GREGORY CARL PEREZ 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Dental 



JOSEPH F. PERITO 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



KULAPAT PERMBHUSRI 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Physics 



SUSAN M. PERREAULT 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



GERARD A. PERRINE 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 




LALISA F. PETERS 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 




fe jf th 




CHRISTIAN PETERSEN 

School of Management 

BS Business Administration 



GREG B. PETERSEN 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



MARY HELEN PETERSON 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



MICHAEL E. PETERSON 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 

Philosophy 




MARCO PETRINI 

School of Management 

BS General Management 



ALEXANDER H. PETRO 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



ANN MARIE PETROLATI 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Pscyhology 



JEANNE M. PETRUS 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



GERARD P. PHELAN 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



Seniors / 353 



JOHN D. PHELAN 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



JOHN T. PHELAN 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Pre-Medical 

Chemistry 



MICHAEL V. PHELAN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



JEFFREY M. PHILLIPS 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 

Economics 



PANTIPA PHONGSATHORN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Computer Science 




JAMES W. PIER 
Arts & Sciences 
BS Psychology 



REBECCA A. PIETROPAOLI 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



DAVID M. PIETTE 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



LISA PIKE 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



FRANCINE PIRRI 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political 

Science Economics 




LAURA PISANELLI 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 



ROBERT W. PITNEY 

School of Management 

BS Operations Management 



EDWARD L. PLA 

School of Management 

BS Finance 

Philosophy 



LISAJ.PLACEK 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



CHRISTOPHER J. PLANTE 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 




MICHAEL PLEUS 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Chemistry 



ELIZABETH A. POEL 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



RICHARD POLINER 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 



MARIE T.POUTIS 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



DIANE F. POLUTCHKO 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



354 / Seniors 



LISA A. POPIELSKI 

Arts & Sciences 
BS Psychology 



JENNIFER E.POPP 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



LEONORA PORAVAS 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



HOPE A. PORELL 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 

Speech Communication 



JOHN POULOS 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 




Andy Ryan 



Its in my top drawer. 



wasnt everything? If it wasnt there it was 
undoubtedly in your bottom drawer. 

As I cleaned them out at the end of the 
year, I couldn't believe how much had 
been casually thrown in there, A years worth 
of junk was "stored" in there, whether for 
lack of a better place or because I was too 
lazy to walk two feet to the trashcan. Inven- 
tory of the contents pulled out at the end of 
the 1984-85 school year were as follows: 

— 1 bazooka Joe bubble gum comic strip 
wrapper 

— 3 rolls of tape (rolls 2 and 3 were bought 
because I couldn't find 1 and 2) 

— the December 2 issue of the Heights 

— 2 champagne corks (one from my 22nd 
birthday, one from New Year's Eve) 

— 3 ticket stubs 

— a ripped Homecoming ticket 

— newsclippings from the Globe 
— an address book 

— a pair of scissors 

— a napkin from Guadala Harry's 

— receipt for my class ring 

— 3 letters 

— 2 birthday cards 

— dead batteries 

— Baybank envelopes 

— 5 dried out pens 

— an Econ exam dated November 26th 

— BC ID thought long lost 

— assorted change amounting to $2.13 

— matchbook from Friday's 

— beer caps 



— confirmed registration slip 

— dirt 

— Pieces of thread 

— the heel that fell off my fry boots 

— white-out 

— assorted scraps of cellophane 

— skate key 

— name tag from frosh mixer 

— screw driver 

— letter opener 

— shoe laces chewed by roomate's cat 

— mailing labels 

— space fillers 

— three year old phone messages 
—jean jacket button 

— de-shirted alligator 

— bicycle lock 

— cigarette boxes 

— pictures of friends from home 

— typewriting paper 

— rulers 

— crayons 

— pastels 

— hockey schedule 

— staples 

— extension cords 

— scissors 

— bumper stickers 

— spare set of keys 

— calculator 

This was definitely a case of "everything 
but the kitchen sink". 

— Roberta Blaz 



AMY E.POWER 

Arts 8c Sciences 

AB Sociology 



ANDREW B. POWERS 

Arts 8t Sciences 

BS Biology 




SUSAN L. POWERS 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



LAURA C. PRADDAUDE 
Arts &. Sciences 

BS Biology 
Mathematics 




LISA G. PRATT 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



LISA M. PREZIOSO 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



Seniors / 355 



MARK J. PRISCO 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 

Sociology 



SHELLY M. PROCKO 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Mathematics 



ROBERT J. PROFACI 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



PIERRE-RICHARD PROSPER 

Arts & Sciences 
AB' Romance Language 



CYNTHIA L. PUTZ 

School of Education 

AB Elem-Special Education 




JENNYA.QUIGLEY 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



GREGORY T.QUINAN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 



CHRISTOPHER T.QUINCY 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



CHRISTOPHER P. QUINLAN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Economics 

History 



ANGELA C.QUINN 
School of Education 
AB Early Childhood 




LONNIE W. QUINN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



MARY L. QUINN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



ALFONSO NICOLAS QUINTANS 

School of Management 

BS Economics 



ROBERTS. RADIE 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Chemistry 



KATHERINE A. RAFFERTY 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 




ANNE RAINVILLE 

School of Management 

BS Business Administration 



MARIA R. RAMOS 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



ELLEN B. RAMUNNI 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



JULIE L. RANGER 

Arts & Sciences 

AB French 



MAUREEN E. RAPOSA 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Geology 



356 / Seniors 




SUZANNE RAPOZA 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Chemistry 



LORI L, RAUTIOLA 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 




PAULA L. RAYMOND 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Studio Art 

Speech Communication 



TIMOTHY M. REA 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



EMPLOYER 
REFERENCE MATERIAL 



RECRUITING SIGN UPS 



E 



I 

r 



CREDENTIALS 



Andy Ryan 

Checklist For Tomorrow's interview 




1. Dark blue suit — Shows taste, conserva- 
tive outlook. A reminder that you only own 
one and will have to lay out big bucks if you 
get the job. Hides wildly thumping heart 
and butterflies during the interview. 

2. Serious shoes — Give pinching reminders 
of summer sandals and Plex sneakers of lost 
college years. Tailored for steps on the road 
to Success. 

3. Tie — Almost always a shade of maroon. 
School spirit, perhaps? Will become un- 
comfortable after a half-hour because you 
have never worn it that long before without 
loosening it. 

4. Resume — Begins with an objective they 
told you that you had to have, even though 
you have no idea what you wanted to do. 
Filled with activities that were joined for fun 
but which sound so alien when described 
with such Career Center adjectives as "al- 
located", "supervised", and "delegated". 
Complete with list of summer jobs that show 



an interest in your field. Will they go for 
"landscape maintenance" when if was 
only lawn-mowing? All was typset on fine 
paper to impress them with your tasteful at- 
tention to detail. (See briefcase). 

5. Briefcase — Embarassingly empty ex- 
cept for copies of resume and letters of rec- 
ommendation. Usually monogrammed if 
Mom gave it to you for Christmas. 

6. BC Ring — Prominently displayed, espe- 
cially during football season. Besides, rt 
matched the tie. 

7. Firm handshake — Accompanied by 
practiced direct gaze. Showed confi- 
dence but always revealed a sweaty palm. 
If you are female, this was the hardest part 
to learn well. 

8. Positive outlook — Always helpful if you 
get turned down. Don't worry, you'll be 
greatl 

— Colleen Seibert 




PAMELA L. READY 
Arts & Sciences 

AB English 
Political Science 



KAREN A. REARDON 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



BRIAN M. REDMOND 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



DENNIS P. REDMOND 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



ALINA REDZINIAK 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Economics 

Spanish 




BRIAN REGAN 

School of Management 

BS Business Administration 



SHAWN MICHAEL REGENT 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



JOHN A. REGO 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



SOLEDAD REICHARD 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



ROBERT REID 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



Seniors / 357 



DEIRDREM. REIDY 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



ROBERT F. REIFEISS 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



KEVIN B. REILLEY 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 

Computer Science 



KAREN A, REILLY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 



KATHLEEN M. REILLY 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 




KIM J. REILLY 


THERESA M. REILLY 


EDMUND C.REITER 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


AB English 


AB Psychology 


BS Geophysics 



ANGELA K. RELLA 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Psychology 

Pre-Medical 



ANNE M. RENEHAN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 




Sounds of the Times 



The room was empty except for 
a Pioneer stereo and a portrait on 
the wall, A young man wearing 
blue jeans and a long black wool 
overcoat came in, turned the 
stereo on to WZBC and sprawled 
on the couch to listen to the mod- 
em rock. Soon, he fell asleep. 

A girl, donned in bright pink at- 
tire with black shoes and skin tight 
jeans, came in and turned the 
station to WKSS. Prince's "Purple 
Rain" was playing and she be- 
gan to sing into her gloves. Soon 
the song ended and she left. 

A German Shepherd came in 
and nosed the tuner to WZOU, 
Madonna was on. He sniffed and 
whined, changed the station to 
WBCN and lay down beside the 
fellow. 

The sociologist, sitting behind 
the wall, wrote furiously. 

— Tania Zielinski 




ALISON REYNDERS 

School of Management 

BS Finance 

Computer Science 



Peter Hillenbrand 



358 / Seniors 





SUZANN REYNOLDS 

School of Education 

AB Elementary Education 



CATHERINE A. RHINEHART 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



LEIGH T.RHODES 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



BRIAN K.RICE 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



scon A. RICE 

School of Management 

BS Finance 

Marketing 




ALISON E. RICH 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



JOHANNA RICHARDSON 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



TERRENCE A. RICHARDSON 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 

Marketing 



LAURA RICHIN 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Philosophy 



ANNE M. RIGNEY 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 




LAURA RIGUZZI 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Computer Science 



RICHARD M. RILEY 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



JULIETTAS.RINALDI 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



PAMELA J. RISIO 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



MARISOL RIVERA 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 




JACQUELINE NANCY ROBERTS 
Arts & Sciences 

AB French 
Political Science 



MAUREEN E. ROBERTS 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 



ANN W.ROBINSON 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



JOHN ROBINSON 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



SUSAN A. ROBITAILLE 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



Seniors / 359 




CARMEN E. ROCAFORT 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 

Finance 




WILLIAM ROCHE 

School of Management 

BS Human Resource 

Management 



A Day Late and a Dollar Short 



"I swear I'll never let myself get 
behind again. Never ..." 

How many times did we say it 
or hear it? Though we all went into 
each semester with good inten- 
tions, the end was always the 
same. Somehow with a week left 
before finals, we always 
managed to be at least four hun- 
dred pages behind in our read- 
ing. It was a simple fact of life. It 
was almost as if it couldn't be 
avoided even if you tried. Each 
semester, books go unopened 
and papers don't get typed until 
11 :00 pm the night before they're 
due. It wasn't just you, it was al- 
most everyonell By the time we 
were seniors, we simply learned 
to accept the fact: College was 
just four years of being behind 
and struggling to catch up. 

— Berta Blaz 




Staff photo 




ERINANNE RODDY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political 

Science 



MARY E. RODDY 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



CHRISTINA E. RODRIGUEZ 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 



MARTHA C.RODRIGUEZ 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



VILMA E. RODRIGUEZ 

School of Education 

AB Human Development 

Spanish 




SUSAN M. ROGLER 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



REX J. ROLDAN 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 



PAULG. ROLINCIK 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 



TERRY A. ROMANOLI 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



J. KENNETH III ROOS 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



360 / Seniors 



MANUEL J. ROSALES 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Psychology 

Philosophy 



JOANNE K. ROSELLI 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



KIMBERLY A. ROSSI 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



PETER A. ROSSI 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 



WALTER T.ROSSI 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 




NORA RUBACKY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



WADE G. RUBINSTEIN 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 

Computer Science 



ELIZABETH RUDOLPH 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



IRENES. RUEPP 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Mathematics 



RICHARD E. RUFFEE 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 




VICTOR RUIZ 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Spanish 

Speech Communication 



THOMAS J. RUPPRECHT 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



MARIE E. RUSSO 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



MICHELLE S. RUSSO 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 



PATRICIA A. RUSSO 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 




*thdl 




MONICA K.RUTKOVSKIS 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Political Science 



CHRISTOPHER M. RYAN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Art History 



KENNETH E. RYAN 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



NICHOLAS J. RYAN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



TERESA RYAN 

School of Education 

AB Elem-Special Education 



Seniors / 361 




i*4 i) 




JOHN E. SACCO 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Psychology 

Philosophy 



ROBERT M. SACCO 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Chemistry 



JOHN P. SADOWEY 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 



ELENA M.SAENZ 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



FRANK J. SAFINA 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 




JACQUELINE SALAMON 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 



THOMAS SALAMON E 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



JOANNE E. SALTSMAN 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



ROBYN C. SALVONI 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



ANALISA F. SAMA 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 




EVAT.SAMAAN 


STEPHEN SAMOLYK 


LESLIE C. SAMUELRICH 


VICTORIA L SAN JUAN 


CARLA SANDY 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


AB Political Science 


BS Biology 


AB Economics 


BS Biology 


AB Philosophy 


History 


Pre-Medical 




Pre-Medical 


Political Science 




\ \ 



LAURAJ.SANTANGELO 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



LISA E. SANTANGELO 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



LORI SAUERBECK 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Psychology 

Philosophy 



DARLYN E. SAUMELL 
Arts & Sciences 
BS Psychology 



CATHY A. SAVAGE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



362 / Seniors 



LINDAA.SAWIN 
School of Education 
AB Early Childhood 



DIANE B. SCAFURA 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



JULIE SCALABRINO 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Spanish 



SANDRA SCARFONE 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



CAROLA.SCHAFER 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Computer Science 





4ffc 






,\ 



NANCY W.SCHNEBLY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 

Economics 



TARA SCHOEN 

School of Education 

AB Severe Special Needs 

Psychology 



RICHARD C. SCHRECK 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



GAILS.SCHRIMMER 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



ELLEN SCHULER 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 




JOHN A. SCHWART 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Mathematics 

Pre-Medical 



LAWRENCE WILLIAM SCHWARTZ 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 




MARCI P. SCHWARTZ 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



JOE SCHWEGMAN 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 

Economics 




Makis latridis 



A Long Way from Home 



Imagine the shock of going to go to a 
foreign country to study. Imagine struggling 
to understand a foreign language on a 
day-to-day basis. Imagine trying to make 
friends with people who viewed you as a 
foreigner, perhaps even viewed your 
homeland with dislike. That is what an in- 
ternational student had to face. From Can- 
ada, Brazil, Argentina, Switzerland, Japan, 
Thailand; they came from everywhere. 
They had to be admired. For some, it was a 
subtle change from what they were used to. 
But for others, it was drastic. The minute they 
reached the United States, they were on for- 
eign soil. Sure the trees looked the same 
and the sky looked the same, but it was very 
different. Many had no idea where to go or 
what to do. Tasks that seemed trivial in one's 
homeland were so how much more com- 
plicated in a foreign land. 



For some the adjustment was easy. But for 
others, it was traumatic. Some made friends 
with American students easily, Some chose 
to make friends with other foreign students 
who were experiencing the same "culture 
shock". The homesickness we may have felt 
freshman year would have to tripled to 
match the homesickness many of them felt. 
They couldn't just hop in the old car and go. 
Some couldn't even pick up the phone and 
call it wasn't that simple. 

It did get easier for many. They weren't 
expected to accept American ways nor 
were they expected to abandon the tradi- 
tions of their homelands. They had to blend 
the two traditions together. Those who were 
able to do so successfully found that the 
shock wore off and America had much to 
offer. 



Seniors / 363 




AM* 




LISAJ.SCIBEnA 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



RICHARD F. SCOCOZZA 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



JEFFREY A. SCOTT 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Chemistry 

Pre-Medical 



SUSAN E. SCOTT 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



GINA M. SCUSSELL 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 




VICTORIA SEARS 


SUZANNE J. SEGUIN 


CYNTHIA J. SEIB 


COLLEEN E. SEIBERT 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


AB English 


AB Mathematics 


AB Psychology 


AB English 



RANDALL P. SEIDL 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 




ELIZABETH B. SEIGENTHALER 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 

English 



JEANNE SELTZER 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



LAURA E. SEMPLE 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



STACEY A. SENNAS 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



FIROOZ SEPAHPUR 

School of Management 

BS Finance 




JOHN K. SEXTON 

School of Management 

BS Finance 

Accounting 



THOMAS A. SEYFFERT 

School of Management 

BS Operations Mgmt. 



COLLEEN M. SHANNON 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 

Computer Science 



THOMAS J. SHANNON 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 



STEVEN C. SHARAF 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 



364 / Seniors 




O £\ 




RHENU SHARMA 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Denral 

Mathematics 



WENDY J. SHAW 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



ANNE. SHEA 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



GREGORY J. SHEA 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



SI08HAN SHEEHAN 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 




Makis latridis 



Going to the Rat 



"Well, looks like I'm going to be up all 
night, studying for that test tomorrow." 

"Yeah, me too. I have a paper that's due 
tomorrow too. Looks like a long night, huh?" 

"Yep, Gonna sit here and study all night." 

"All night. Gonna get it done." 

"Yep." 

"Yep." 

"Who are we kidding? The Rat — now — 
let's go!" 
Tmmobilel" 

There was some magnetic force sur- 
rounding the Rat on Thursday nights that 
made you go, even if you had absolutely 
no Intention of setting foot in the door. Pa- 
pers, exams, speeches — all were shoved 
aside by 10:15 every Thursday to hit the big- 
gest (and only) school sponsored meat 
market on campus. 

There were a few unspoken but well de- 
fined rules Involved in going to the Rat on 
Thursday. First, it was definitely "not cool" to 
come to the Rat before 10:00, or 9:45 if there 
happened to be a band. Most everybody 
could find something to do in the early eve- 
ning, so that they could come to the Rat at 
the fashionable hour. The one exception to 
the "late Rat rule" was the first night the Rat 
was open in September, when people 
lined up outside the door at 6:30 to get in, 

It was usually safe to bet that no one 
would dance on the dance floor until he or 
she had had at least two beers. Occasion- 
ally, either a very outgoing or very eccentric 



person would start bopping early, but the 
average BC'er needed a little "loosening 
up" first. Of course, once the happy student 
had downed a few, he became a maniac 
on the floor. No one was safe from flying 
arms and legs, flying beer or flying dance 
partners, 

Speaking of dance partners, probably 
the favorite activity at the Rat on Thursdays 
was the weekly, "Pick-Up-A-Thon," where 
charming BC students attempted to scoop 
on each other while drinking and dancing 
simultaneously — no easy feat. 

Another "fun feat" was the scramble for 
the first available waitress. There was a defi- 
nite art to this. First, you had to find the wait- 
ress with the most beer on her tray. 
Naturally, that meant that she had just left 
the bar and the beers would be relatively 
cold, A good plus was to remember her 
name or shirt and give her a decent tip. 
Chances were high that towards the end of 
the night, when it got very crowded, it 
would be a clear advantage to be "in" with 
the waitress. 

Why did we do this week after week — 
drink ourselves to oblivion and wake up on 
Friday afternoon dying of embarrassment 
about what we had done or said the night 
before? Or missing that important Friday 
morning class even though you knew you 
had a quiz? I don't know, I think it's kind of 
kind of fun, myself. 

— Laurie Berkenkamp 



STEPHEN SHEEHAN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 



JONATHAN SHEETZ 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Sociology 




MICHELE M. SHERBAN 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Chemistry 



MICHAEL J. SHERRY 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 




JEFFREY A. SHMASE 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



ADAM SHOLES 
School of Management 
BS General Management 



Seniors / 365 




Some Bad Apples 



"One bad apple 
can spoil the whole 
bunch", the saying 
goes. The case could 
not have been more 
true tor the residents of 
McElroy 103 over the 
past three years. Duds 
were the more common name for those malfunctioning ma- 
chines. Still others called them lemons. But still others referred 
to them ever so fondly as Apples. 

The computer age first thrust itself upon Sub Turrian writers 
when the 1983 edition was being compiled. The work of the 
staff writers was cut in half. Efficiency was doubled. 

1984: "I can't find it!H"l, screamed Kathy Kopy from the 
computer room, 
"What do you mean you can't find it," Ted Itor growled. 
"I can't find it I'm telling you, it's gonel It's just gone . . ."her 
voice trailed off beginning to guiver. 

"That isn't possible. This is a computer. Computers don't 
make mistakes. People do. We'll get it fixed tomorrow." 

"Tomorrow never comes," the sign in the computer room 
read. "For when yesterday's tomorrow arrives it is but today 
and tomorrow is still 24 hours away." 




Chris Taylor 



MARGRETJ.SIBILLA 

School of Education 

AB Secondary Education 

Mathematics 




TERRI L. SIEBER 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 

Human Resource Management 



JANET M.SIEGENTHALER 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 

Asian Studies 



SHERRIL. SIFERS 
Arts &. Sciences 
AB Economics 



STEPHEN A. SIGNORE 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



WILLIAM C. SILEO 

School of Management 

BS Finance 

Economics 




CRISTINA R. SILVA 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 

Finance 



MARCY L. SILVERSTEIN 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 

Operations Management 



WILLIAM M. SIMEONE 
Arts 8c Sciences 
AB Economics 



STEPHEN SIMOES 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



MARIA R. SIMONEAU 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



366 / Seniors 



STEPHEN L. SITLEY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 



RICHARD A. Sin 


MATTHEW R. SKERRY 


MARY C. SKUFCA 


MARGARET C.SLADDEN 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


BS Computer Science 
Finance 


AB Speech Communication 


AB Economics 


AB English 




WILLIAM R. SLATER 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



JULIE M. SLIKE 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



DAVIDA.SLOCUM 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



NICOLE SMIT 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



ANTHONY B. SMITH 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 

Philosophy 




CHRISTINE M. SMITH 


GRETCHEN SMITH 


KATHARINE SMITH 


KEVIN SMITH 


MARY C. SMITH 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


AB History 


BS Accounting 


BS Marketing 


BS Biology 
Pre-Medical 


AB Mathematics 









ROBERT A. SMITH 


SHEILA M. SMITH 


RICHARD P. SMYTH 


KEVIN D. SNOW 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


AB History 


BS Computer Science 


AB Sociology 


BS Computer Science 


Pre-Medical 




Speech Communication 





CHERYL A. SOBOLEWSKI 

School of Management 

E.S. Marketing 



Seniors / 367 




f ■ r i 



rjS 




LAURA SOFFEY 


ANTHONY M. SOLOMINE 


DONNAJ.SOMERS 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


AB English 


AB History 


AB Mathematics 


Speech Communication 




Computer Science 



THOMAS T.SOVIERO 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



ALBERT SPADA 

School of Management 

BS Finance 




NANCY SPADARO 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 



SAMUEL B. SPECTOR 
School of Management 
BS Organizational Studies 



SUSAN SPENCE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



JONATHAN A. SPEROS 

School of Management 

BS Economics 

Finance 



JOHN M. SPIEGEL 

School of Management 

BS Finance 




THEO E. SPILKA 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 

French 




OWEN D. SPITZLER 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



Springtime, the Fall of the GPA 



The fresh scent of spring was in 
the air. Warm winds played with 
the curtains, jostling them as they 
rested against the open window. 
A shrill note sounded and a small 
red-breasted robin flew out of the 
blossoming oak tree that stood in 
front of the dorm. 

A slight rustle came from within 
the room as a weightless paper 
fell to the floor. Schoolbooks, 
some opened, some closed and 
stuffed with unfinished assign- 
ments, were carelessly strewn 
atop the desk. The felt tip marker 
was uncapped, apparently 
abandoned. 

Where was the student? What 
voice had beckoned him from his 
persistent battle for a notorious 
GPA? The seductive siren of 
Spring had won again . . . 

— Tania Zielinski 




Andy Ryan 



368 / Seniors 



GAIL M. STACK 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 

Speech Communication 



JUNE F. STAKUN 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



SHARON M, STALEY 

School of Education 

AB Elementary Education 



EMILIA M. STANCO 

School of Management 

BS Finance 

Computer Science 



MARIA A. STANCO 

School of Management 

BS Finance 




PATRICIA A. STANDRING 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



LINDA STANKARD 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



BRIAN D. STANSKY 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



JACQUELINE J. STARITA 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 

Marketing 



BRIAN A. STAUB 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 




SUSAN E. STEELE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



FREDERICK R. STEEVES 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



ANDREA STEGERWALD 

School of Education 

AB Elem-Special Education 



CARAA.STEINER 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Psychology 

Economics 



GABRIELLE M. STEINER 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 




KATHLEEN M. STENSTROM 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



CLAUDIO H. STEUER 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 

Marketing 



DOUGLAS A. G. STEVENSON 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 



DONALD R. STEWART 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Computer Science 



AUDREY R. STILLMAN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Art History 



Seniors / 369 



GAIL M. STOCKMAN 
Art & Sciences 
AB Economics 



HELEN R. STOCKTON 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



PATRICIA J. STONE 

School of Education 

AB Speech Communication 



WALTER E. STONE 

School of Education 

AB Secondary Education 



SUSAN A. STONEY 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 




HARRY P. STRACCIA 


SCOTT D. STRUG 


NANCY STURGIS 


PETER R. SULICK 


CAROLINE M. SULLIVAN 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Nursing 


AB Political Science 


AB Speech Communication 


BS Biology 


AB Economics 


BS Nursing 




DAVID J. SULLIVAN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Mathematics 

Computer Science 



DONALD J. SULLIVAN 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 



ELIZABETH J. SULLIVAN 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



JAMES C.SULLIVAN 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 



JAMES J. SULLIVAN 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Mathematics 




KATHLEEN M. SULLIVAN 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



LOUISE M. SULLIVAN 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



MARJORIE D. SULLIVAN 

School of Education 
AB Severe Special Needs 



MATTHEW T.SULLIVAN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



MAUREEN SULLIVAN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 



370 / Seniors 



MICHAEL L SULLIVAN 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Mathematics 



PAUL M. SULLIVAN 

School of Management 

BS Economics 



PAULA J. SULLIVAN 

Arts and Sciences 

AB Fine Arts 



RENEE A. SULLIVAN 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



WILLIAM J. SULLIVAN 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 




MEDELISESUMMA 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



LIANNE M. SUPPLE 

School of Education 

AB Elem-Special Education 



KEVIN P. SUPPLES 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Studio Art 



JOHN A. SUTTON 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 

Computer Science 



LAURA M. SWAIN 

School of Management 

BS Finance 




Mary Leonard 



Custodians 



No university could function properly 
without the dedication of its employees. BC 
was no exception. Fortunately, however BC 
had that dedication. The men and women 
who kept the university running during the 
four years that the class of 1985 spent here 
were as much a part of the university as any 
student. 

If one took a good look around the cam- 
pus in Chestnut Hill, a common sight would 
have been that of a hard working individ- 
ual. In the dorms, the cafeterias, the class- 
rooms: wherever one looked was a person 
known to everyone as a janitor. They were 
responsible for first and foremost; cleanli- 
ness. 

But, the janitors did much more than 
clean. They, of course did their job dilli- 
gently , but they also found time to be pleas- 



ant and cooperative with the students. The 
janitors really cared about the university 
and the personnel. 

One such Individual was known to most 
only as Henry. Henry was one of the janitors. 
He dedicated over 30 years of his life to 
Boston College. Finally he decided to retire 
with his pension and memories of BC. 

In allowing Henry to retire BC let go of one 
of its most valuable resources. Henry may 
well have known more about BC than the 
director of the archives. His years at BC were 
spent in the offices of the people who de- 
cided the directions BC would take in the 
future. He saw first hand the changes in how 
BC was run and the people who did so. 
Employees like Henry could not be re- 
placed only, retired. 




GREGG SWEENEY 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



KATHLEEN SWEENEY 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 




JOHN SWEENEY 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



KERRY K. SWEENEY 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



Seniors / 371 



SHARON L. SWENTKOFSKE 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



DAVID G.SWIMM 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



ALAN J. SWIRSKI 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



STEPHEN R. SWITAJ 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



VINCENT P. SYLVIA 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 




LAURIE SZYMURA 

School of Education 

AB Elementary Education 



JEANNE M. TABEEK 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



CHRISTINE M. TALENTI 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



RICHARD TANG 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



CAREN A. TARASEVICH 

School of Education 
AB Elementary Education 




STEPHEN J. TATA 


MICHAEL TAYLOR 


SALLY C.TAYLOR 


SUSAN E. TELLIER 


TIMOTHY TELMAN 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts &. Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


BS Psychology 


BS Chemistry 


AB Economics 


AB Art History 


AB Economics 




I 




4lfc4&fc 



ERIC J. TEMPLE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



PAUL E. TERRILE 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Mathematics 



PAUL W.TERRY 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



PETER L. TESTER 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 



PATRICIA A. TEXTOR 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



372 / Seniors 




"Northwest 
Orient, may I 
help you?" 

"Yes, I'd 
like to book 6 
reservations 
to Dallas, 
Texas." 

'"From 
where?" 

"Logan Airport" 

"And, when will you be travelling?" 

"Leaving December 31 , returning January 2." 

"I'm sorry, all flights are booked for the 31st." 

"How 'bout out of Newark or LaGuardia?" 

"Uh. . .no, I'm sorry," 

"Washington?" 

"Nol" 

"How 'bout for the 30th?" 

"Out of., ." 

"Any of those cities." 

"No, sorry, they're all booked." 

"Can you check for the first available flight?" 

"Let's see , . , (long pause) . . . okay, I have 
something. Six reservations out of LaGuardia on 
December 27th. But, you won't be arriving in Texas 
till the 28th. There are a few little layovers — You've 
got to stop in Minnesota. Then you have to go to 
Dulles in Washington to switch flights. Actually, you 
have to switch airports. You have to take a shuttle 
to National. But, don't worry, you have plenty of 
time ... 5 1/2 hours. You'll be landing in Houston 
but there's a shuttle to Dallas. You can return on the 
4th of January. Only $248 a ticket." 

"We'll take it." 

"Okay , . . let's see, that's 6 reservations to Hous- 
ton out of LaGuardia via Minnesota and Washing- 
ton on December 27, returning to LaGuardia on 
January 4 by the same route. 

"You got itl" 

"Well, what are we going to do in Dallas for a 
week. I mean it's not exactly 'The Big Apple!" 

"WHO CARES?I!" We're going to the Cotton 
Bowl, never mind the expenses! Besides we can 
always save money on the room ... I'm sure that 
they won't notice all ten of us at once." 

"TEN PEOPLE IN A ROOM FOR FOUR?l!" 

Cotton Bowl fever had hit. Win, lose or draw, you 
had to be there. This wasn't a bowl from the "who 
cares?" column. There were all sorts of reasons for 
going to the Cotton Bowl. One was the simple fact 
that everyone else seemed to be going. Naturally 
that only added to the importance of this rare 
event. 

The second reason was dam it this was 1985 and 
we were all paying big money to attend this won- 
derful institute of higher learning. Face it, with tui- 
tion, room and board fees hovering near the 
twelve thousand dollar mark, (if not more) and 
about fourteen thousand dollars in school loans to 
pay back when we graduated from college, 
what was a mere $300.00? A drop in the bucket of 
course. 

Most important, when Doug Flutie accepted 
that Heisman trophy he said he did it with the sup- 
port of the entire BC community. And if that BC 
community couldn't follow our team down to the 
Cotton Bowl where they had led us, well that 
wouldn't be too supportive would it? We were 
proud of ourteam and our school and we revelled 
in the popularity that the football teams success 
had generated. 

This was big time ... it would be a long time 
before we would have this opportunity again . . , 
the folks at home would just have to understand 
. . . call the doctor ... win the lottery ... the BC 
community was Dallas bound ... we were head- 
ing for Dallas, Texas . , . many of us for the first time 
... in the city's bar's we would herald the new year 
, . .Texas would never be the same again. 

— Berta B. and Tania Z. 




Staff photo 



Seniors / 373 



DUNG K. THAI 


EILEEN M. THAYER 


JEFFREY D. THIELMAN 


GREGORY P. THERRIEN 


DAVID C. THOMAS 


School of Management 
BS Accounting 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


BS Geophysics 


AB Political Science 


BS Computer Science 


BS Biology 


Finance 








Pre-Medical 
Philosophy 










ELLEN J. THOMAS 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



EILEEN M.THOMPSON 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



KEVIN J. THORNTON 

Arts & Sciences 

BS English 



JOHN M. TICHENOR 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



PATRICE L TIERNEY 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 




MARKE.TIMMONS 


ROSEANN M. TIMPONE 


CHRISTOPHER G.TIMSON 


MAUREEN C. TOBIN 


ANN M. TONNER 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


BS Geology 


AB English 


AB Philosophy 


AB English 


AB Speech Communication 


Geology & Geophysics 












LYNNE TOOMBS 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



PAMELA A. TOOMEY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 

Speech Communication 



ANTONIO TORIO 

School of Management 

BS Economics 



STEVEN S. TORTOLANI 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 

Economics 



CHRISTOPHER M.TOTA 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Psychology 

Pre-Dental 

Biology 



374 / Seniors 



KAREN A. TOTE 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Mathematics 



DIANE M. TOWN 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Mathematics 



MICHAEL A. TRAMONTANO 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Computer Science 



MARY A. TRAMONTOZZI 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



JANE C. TRAVERS 

School of Education 

AB Human Development 




ROBERT J. TRAVERS 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 



CARLA.TRAYLOR 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political 

Science 




JAMES E.TREANOR 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Computer 

Science 



CHRISTOPHER R. TRIPUCKA 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Speech Communication 




ROSEMARY TROVATO 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 



JOHN TROY 

School of Management 

BS Economics 

Marketing 




Makis latridis 



Best Friends 



Spirits soared. You passed the biology 
exam you studied for two weeks. Who did 
you call first? 

Your heart took the plunge. The best rela- 
tionship of your life was over. Who consoled 
you? 

The big game approached. An honest 
autumn nip clipped through the air. Tail- 
gates awaited your arrival. Who did you go 
with? 

Best friends were a rare breed. While it 
seemed that everyone had one there were 
few people who could fill that role for any 
one person. (Best friends had the prerequi- 
site of being individually tailored to said 
friend's irrational needs and wants at any 
point in time.) It is comforting therefore to 
know that when one is made they will last a 
lifetime. 

Best friends stick by you through every- 
thing whether it be a disaster or celebration. 
Ah . . , the celebrations, how wildly sweet 
they were, 

It all started sophomore year after you 
finally got away from that loser the university 
gave you for a roommate, 

"HI" 

"Hi" 

"Is Teresa here?" 

"No, she's uh . . , at the library" 

"Oh, I'm Lisa ... I live down the hall. 
Would you want to play backgammon?" 

"Sure anything to blow off economics. It's 
my major, but I hate it. I'm failing it too. 
Maybe that's why I hate it so much. I never 
particularly enjoy something I stink at." 
On hour later and the three gammons later. 

"Remember how I told you I didn't enjoy 
things I stink at?" 

"Yeah" 

"Well I think backgammon just became 
one of them." 

Funny how best friends managed to be- 



gin losing after a while to make sure you 
didn't throw the board at them. 

Sometimes things just click. That's usually 
the way it is with best friends. But that doesn't 
mean there isn't room to grow closer. And 
during the college years that is exactly 
what happened. So it took her two and a 
half years to realize that the theory that 
Springsteen was God's gift to the world was 
100% correct. 

It wasn't always that much fun of course 
there were those gigantic fights. The time 
you went skiing in New Hampshire and got 
cabin fever you almost ripped each others 
heads off. It was okay though, she left her 
boots in the car and skied with frozen feet 
the next day for it. Well, it was mostly her 
fault wasn't it? Oh, maybe not. 

Best friends do a lot of funny things, They 
actually listened when you made abso- 
lutely no sense. Yeah, best friends definitely 
had the funny ways of doing things. One 
minute they would swear that they would 
never leave, that they would always be 
there for you and the next minute they 
would take off to Europe for a semester. 
That was a fine how-do-you-do (as mother 
always said). But through the months they 
would spend abroad letter after letter and 
postcard after postcard would be sent to 
remind you that they still cared and in fact 
had never really left. 

'What have you been doing? I want 
names, places and all the intimate details," 
you screamed at each other in unison upon 
reuniting, Ah well, there was always the sec- 
ond half of senior year to share together. 

Though college ended and we may 
have drifted apart our memories cannot be 
stripped from us. And through those mem- 
ories our hearts will remain forever with our 
best friends, 



Seniors / 375 




House Calls 



Whoever 

thought, 
while spend- 
ing many un- 
pleasant 
Sunday 
mornings 
aruguing 
with our par- 
ents because they wanted us to wear "our Sunday 
outfits" to mass and we wanted to wear our jeans 
and sneakers, that someday while we spent four 
years at Boston College the largest Catholic Uni- 
versity in the nation we be wearing sweats and 
shorts to mass? It felt quite appropo to just flop on a 
pair of flip flops, or slip on a pair of socks before 
walking down the hall to the lounge for mass. 

The lounge atmosphere was another factor 
making the masses a unique experience. Fresh- 
man year on Newton campus dorm masses were 
held once a month. That was the Jesuit way of 
breaking students into the culture shock sitting on 
the floor indian style for the communal Catholic 
ceremony rather than sitting up straight in pews 
and kneeling down and up and down and up 
and down and up. The laid back atmosphere of 
the dorm mass coincided with the relaxed atmo- 
sphere of the lounges on Newton. The lounge was 
used for everything from occasional studying to 
frisbee, football, late night bull sessions and ice- 
cream sundae parties. It was amazing how a 
priest, a white table cloth, a couple of candles 
and some guitars can transform a usual place of 
fun and frolic into one of serious thought and 
prayer. The upper campus experience was similar 
to the Newton Campus one. 

On lower campus dorm masses seemed to 
grow up a little because the lounges were the 
sight of some pretty serious studying. So now dorm 
masses were being held in a place where Shake- 
speare was read, economics was paniced over 
and Freud was figured. But on Sunday nights the 
lights were dimmed and an atmosphere of a 
chapel was created. That's what the dorm mass 
was: a place where roommates, friends, neigh- 
bors and classmates came together to take an 
hour to spend some spiritual time together and 
reflect on life. What better place to do so than in 
one that is part of everyday life. Why should a suit 
jacket or pair of high heels be required? Some 
pretty serious soul searching was done sitting in- 
dian style on the floor leaning against a radiator 
wearing sweats and socks. Sharing community 
was an important part of the mass. What better 
atmosphere than one where all those who partici- 
pate lived together? 

— Sue Towney 




Alison Brooks 




MATTHEW F. TROY 

Arts 8c Sciences 

BS Economics 



PAULA A. TROY 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Sociology 



BARBARA Z. TRZNADEL 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Mathematics 



GRACE H. TSANG 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



ROBERT M. TURCOTTE 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 



376 / Seniors 



JOSEPH C. TUTERA 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



KAREN E. TWITCHELL 

School of Education 

AB Elem-Special Education 



SALLIANNE TYCHANICH 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



JAMESJ.TYMA 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



JENNIFER I. TYRELL 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 

Speech Communication 




MARY T.TYRRELL 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



ARTHUR O. TZIANABOS 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 



CORI E. UCCELLO 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Mathematics 

Biology 



LAURIE A. UERZ 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



BARBARA J. UNDERWOOD 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 

Economics 




CARLOS M.VAAMONDE 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 

Philosophy 



LINDA M. VACCARO 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



TRACEYJ.VAIL 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



JAYT.VAILLANCOURT 

School of Management 

BS Finance 

Computer Science 



MARCELA E. VALDES 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Philosophy 




MARIA T.VALDIVIESO 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



JOHN A. VAN HAGEN 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



THOMAS J. VANRIPER 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



ERIC W. VAN ZON 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



GERALYN A. VASILE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



Seniors / 377 



CAROL F. VASSALLO 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Geology 



NANCY M. VAZQUEZ 

School of Education 

AB Early Child-Special 

Early Childhood 



BARBARA A. VEALE 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



DAVID W.VECCHI 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



ADRIENNEVENA 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 




JOANNE VERACKA 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



OLGAT.VERGARA 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 



CARLOS H. VIEIRA 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Economics 



CHRISTINA G. VIGLIOTTI 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Mathematics 

Computer Science 



MARLA B. VIGODA 

School of Management 

BS Economics 

Finance 




ROBERT VINASSE 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



MARGARITA M. VINCENTY 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 



THERESE E. VIOLETTE 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



SUSAN VIRTUE 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



PETER VITALE 

School of Management 

BS Finance 




RICHARD L. VLAHA 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



JOHN VOLUNO 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



ELISA A. VOLPATI 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Mathematics 



ANTONIA L. VOLPE 

School of Education 

AB Elementary Education 



CHRISTOPHER J. VOLPE 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



378 / Seniors 



It's not impossible; it's just hard 



Hallucinations, 

meditations, 

sparkling thoughts on a dancing mind, 

harmony and 

rhythm, 

love, 

outstretched mind, 

mental expansion, 

Imagination, 

creativity, 

psychadelism in a barren world, 

fed Ethiopians, 

Unity, 

art, 

Energy, 

Love, 

expression, 

community, 

visions, 

fusion, 

growth 

passion, 

a clean earth, 

beyond the unexpected, 

androgyny, 

society, 

trust, 

Indivuallty, 

faith, 

electricity, 

the Helsman, 

change, 

photography, 

truth, 

Ideals, 



Love, 
Love, 
Love. 

Ahl Sweet desiresl 
Oohl Sweet possibilities 



• Makis latriais 



the 
mirror 
ndthe 
lamp 



theory 
and tni 

critical 
tradition 



M.H.ABRAMS 




The existence 
of forgetting has 
never been prove 
we only know the 
some things do 
not come to our 
mind when we 
want them to." 




Nietzsc 



J-L. 




Makls latridis 




GAIL M. VOZZELLA 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



BERNHARD M, WAASE 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Political Science 



KAREN K. WAHL 

School of Education 

AB Elem-Special Education 



ELLENJ.WAUNSKI 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



SARA A. WALKER 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Mathematics 

Economics 




ANNE-MARIE WALL 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



JANET M. WALSH 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



KELLY A. WALSH 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



MICHAEL E. WALSH 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



SHELAGH WALSH 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 



Seniors / 379 



TIMOTHY J. WALSH 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 



LYNN A. WALTER 


BARBARA F. WARD 


JOHN G.WARD 


MARK J. WARNER 


School of Nursing 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


BS Nursing 


BS Finance 
Human Resource Management 


BS Computer Science 


! AB English 




KRISTEN R. WARPULA 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



ANN G. WARRY 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



SAMUEL WASHINGTON 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



NANCY J. WASSERMAN 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Mathematics 



BRYAN T. WEADOCK 

School of Management 

BS Finance 




MONICA J. WEBSTER 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Geology 



ROBYNE B. WEINER 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



ROBIN M. WEISSBACH 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



DAVID E. WEZDENKO 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



NANCY E. WHALEN 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 




MICHAEL P. WHEALON 

Arts & Sciences 
AB History Philosophy 



LYNNE E. WHELAN 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



CHRISTOPHER W.WHITE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 



ELIZABETH A. WHITE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Speech Communication 



JOHN E. WHITE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 



380 / Seniors 




MARY ANN WHITE 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



PATRICK WHITE 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 




THOMAS J. WHITE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 



WILLIAM P. WHITE 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 




Mary Leonard 



Weekends were made for . 



Michelob, of course. 

If I didn't say Michelob, I could have said 
a number of other things. But hey, the infa- 
mous j ingle demanded the word in order to 
make it a complete advertising sentence. 
Yet, it really wasn't the name of the beer 
that carried the magic, it was it's associa- 
tion to that key word of words — weekend. It 
was no small wonder that everyone 
thanked God for Fridays because they 
really were a saving grace. Weekends 
meant freedom from the dreary, structured 
classroom schedule. Weekends meant 
time to do what you wanted but never had 
the time to do, So, what did we do on those 
wonderful weekends? 

Well, there were the parties. In fact Thurs- 
day and Friday were usually spent in the 
assessment of all the weekend's parties 
and their stats how many kegs? 

In the fall, football games were a primary 



event. With the tremendous popularity thai 
the BC Eagles claimed, everyone seemed 
to get swept up in the whirl of football frenzy 
and tailgate plans abounded Winter 
brought the cold and many a frosty night 
was spent engaged in a game of Trivial 
Pursuit with friends and a pitcher of Bloody 
Marys. 

Not to forget were the weekends that 
were spent in the library writing that twenty 
page research paper or studying for that 
terrible exam. Those weekends never 
seemed to really be 'weekends' but then 
Monday would come and soon it would be 
Thursday and the past weekend would be 
forgotten in the anticipation of the coming 
one. When it came down to it, the true end- 
ing to that jingle wasn't really "Michelob" 
because weekends weren't made for beer, 
they were made for YOU. 

— Tania Zielinski 




KIMBERLY A. WHITNEY 

School of Education 

AB Elementary Education 



KAREN WIDMYER 

School of Education 

AB Human Development 



WILLIAM J. WIEMERS LAUREN J. WILKINS 

School of Education School of Management 

AB Elementary Education BS Human Resource Management 

Marketing 



MARY A. WILKINSON 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 

Pre-Medical 

Mathematics 




MARTHA C.WILLIAMS 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



SHARON N. WILLIS 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



ANNE M. WILLWERTH 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Mathematics 



KATHLEEN J. WILSON 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



Seniors / 381 




MICHELLE A. WILSON 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 







CHERYL E. WINK 

School of Management 

BS Organizational Studies 

Marketing 



From the Pages of our Past 



"Friends for lifel Friends as en- 
dearing as life itself. Such are the 
comrades who were as close 
even at three in the morning as 
they had been at noon. At gradu- 
ation it is not necessary to leave, 
friends, only the common ground 
on which you met." And yet this 
ground, at least is not one of dirt 
and grass from which stately 
Gothic towers rise. It is a tradition 
— a tradition of the ages. For no 
matter how much is forgotten or 
even how much we are able to 
remember, there is something, 
whether we are aware of it or not, 
that we have deposited and 
gained there , . . Although com- 
mencement is a symbol of our 
new beginnings, we begin from a 
height reached by the effort of 
others. And we shall go higher." 
Sub Turrl 1954 




Geoff Why 




*AM 



ALBERT F. WISIALKO 


MARY P. WISK 


ANNE M. WISSLER 


MARYJ.WITKOWSKI 


JEFFREY S.WIH 


School of Management 


School of Nursing 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


BS Marketing 


BS Nursing 


BS Accounting 


BS Psychology 


AB Economics 




LINDA LWIXLER 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Chemistry 

Pre-Medical 



JANICE A. WOLINSKI 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



ANNE WONG 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



BARRY D. WONG 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



JOYCE WONG 

School of Education 

AB Human Development 



382 / Seniors 



LESLEY J. WONG 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



MARGARET MT WONG 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



MARIA WONG 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



MARY WONG 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



PUI YEE WONG 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 




SWEELIN WONG 
Arts & Sciences 
BS Psychology 



YIUFAI E. WONG 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Biology 



DEBORAH W. WOO 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Psychology 



ELAINE M. WOOD 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Mathematics 



CATHERINE M. WRIGHT 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Computer 

Science 
Mathematics 




JANET L WRIGHT 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



MICHELE M. WYS 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



JAMES G. YAHOUB 

School of Management 

BS Finance 



MARKY.YAMAZAKI 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 



TAMMY YAN 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Computer Science 




MILDRED M. YANNIZZE 

School of Nursing 

BS Nursing 



SUSAN J. YARVIS 

School of Management 

BS Computer Science 

Human Resource Management 



JABRAN YASSO 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



MEI-TAI YEE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB English 



JOHN A. YELLE 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Computer Science 

Mathematics 



Seniors / 383 



MICHAEL E. YOST 
Arts & Sciences 
AB Economics 



DEBORAH E. YOUNG 

School of Education 

AB Mathematics 



DONNA YOUNG 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 



KAREN M. YOUNG 

School of Education 

AB Elem-Special Education 



MARY E. YOUNG 

Arts & Sciences 

AB History 




ROBERTS. YOUNG 


LILY K. YU 


JOSEPH W. ZABRISKIE 


THOMAS C.ZAMBITO 


LAURIE J. ZAMPARELLI 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


AB Political Science 


BS Marketing 


AB Political Science 


AB English 


AB Psychology 




JUUAA.ZAPPIA 

School of Management 

BS Economics 



SUZANNE J. ZENKIN 


LINDA M. ZERMANI 


EVANGELINE ZERVOS 


BRIAN M. ZEUG 


School of Education 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


AB Elementary Education 


BS Marketing 


AB English 


AB English 




384 / Seniors 



LAUREN J. ZIEGLER 


TANIA Z. ZIELINSKI 


JANET M.ZIETOWSKI 


SUSAN ZIMMERMAN 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


AB Elem-Special Education 


AB English 


AB English 
Speech Communication 


BS Business Administration 




Conversation 



Whether it 
was an in- 
tellectual 
attempt with 
a professor, 
a late night 
rap with the 
roommates, 
a smooth "come-on" at a party or an oral pre- 
sentation in class, the Boston College student was 
constantly challenged to place the verbal cards 
on the table. Numerous skills were developed and 
refined at BC, but the one skill which was com- 
monly nurtured by all was the gift of gab. 

Conversations abounded on campus and 
everyone was obliged to participate in one or 
more varieties every day. Al I had to learn to recog- 
nize the variety of conversation, their proper role in 
it, and that which they were expected to contri- 
bute. The varieties included the mindless con- 
versation with a casual acquaintance, the short 
but interesting conversation with a former room- 
mate, the intellectual conversation in a professors 
office, the precise conversation with people at 
Student Accounts, the impassioned registration 
conversation with the chairman of the Economics 
department, the risky conversation with that spe- 
cial member of the opposite sex and finally, the 
late night raps with the roommates — the most 
pleasant of them all. 

Each of these conversations carried its own un- 
spoken format; the length, topical boundaries, 
emotional input and degree of interest were all 
silently agreed to by convention. For instance, if, 
while engaging in a mild conversation with an 
acquaintance you were asked, "How's it goin'?", 
you should not have begun weeping and then set 
off on a depressing diatribe about the ten page 
paper you had to write. Also, if it was after mid- 
night and your roommate wanted to argue about 
toothpaste brands it was not proper to roll over 
and fall asleep; you should have taken a stand 
and defended it. 

All of us began our conversation training (BC 
style) when we arrived here our freshman year. The 
"What's your major?" routine may seem silly now 
but it served as an introduction to this fine art. If it 
was September we asked, "how was your sum- 
mer; later in the fall it was, "How 'bout those 
Eagles?" and in the spring we queried, "What are 
you up to this summer?". 

These BS sessions were as rewarding as they 
were time consuming. They were at once enjoy- 
able, humorous, intellectual, silly, adversarial and 
personal. Whether the topic was the opposite sex, 
a professor, a class a news item or last weekend's 
party, it was within the context of these joyful dia- 
logues that we really came to know one another. 
(S.F.) 




Makis latridis 



Seniors / 385 











386 / Gallery 



ga 




Gallery / 387 




Makis latridis 



388 / Gallery 




Gallery / 389 




Makis latridis 



390 / Gallery 



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Peter Klidaras 



Gallery / 391 




Makis latridis 

392 / gallery 




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Gallery / 393 




Peter Klidaras 



394 / Gallery 





Peter Klidaras 



Gallery / 395 




Alison Brooks 

396 / Gallery 



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Gallery / 397 



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398 / gallery 



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Alison Brooks 





Gallery / 399 




Makis latridis 



400 / Gallery 




Makis latridis 



Gallery / 401 




Makis latridis 



402 / Gallery 



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Makis latridis 




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Gallery / 403 




Peter Klidaras 



404 / Gallery 




Peter Klidaras 



Gallery / 405 



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Gallery / 407 



C/3 

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LU 



As Sub Turri is an organization independent trom the University, we receive neither 
University funds nor a portion of the activity fee to defray production costs. Therefore, the 
staff of Sub Turrl would like to extend its gratitude to parents, friends, faculty members 
and alumnae who generously contributed to the 1985 edition of Sub Turri. 



OO 



GOLD 

Mr. and Mrs. Reginald Arnold, Sr. 

Dr. and Mrs. Arturo Azurin 

Mr. and Mrs. John A. Barry 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter J. Barry 

Dr. and Mrs. Eufrocino N. Beltran and 

family 
Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Breslin, Jr 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert R. Callan 
Mr. and Mrs. George L. Carney, Jr. 
Stephen C. Casagrande 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Cashman 
Dr. and Mrs. Nicholas J. Christ 
Mr. and Mrs. John L. Dentzer 
Col. Daniel J. Doherty Aus (Ret) 
Dr. and Mrs. Mario Ebanietti 
Fernando and Sonia Fernandez 
Mr. and Mrs. John G. Foerst 
Mrs. Charlotte Ford 
Mr. and Mrs. Donald C. Garaventi 



408 / Patrons 



Dr. and Mrs. Nicholas J. Garritano 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Lee Gibson 

Dr. and Mrs. Gino L. Giorgini, Jr. 

Raymond D. Goss 

Paul J. Gross 

Edward J. and Mara Harkins 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Harkins 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Harrison 

Senator and Mrs. William T. Hiering 

Mr. and Mrs. John Adam Hillenbrand II 

John and Carol Hines 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul J. Hintelmann, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis M. lannazzi 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas K. Ireland 

Mrs. Edward Kaczka 

Dr. and Mrs. John H. Keating, Jr., 

Parents of John E. White 
Bob and Pauline Kirchner 
Larry and Marge Kotin 
Richard J. Kulle 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward C. Latek 
Harold R. and Joan Lifvendahl 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. McGinty 
Duke McMahon 



DO 

m 



> 

o 

o 

TO 
CO 



Patrons / 409 



GO 

ex. 
O 

< 

LU 



CD 



The Meisenbacher Family, Tom, 1985 

and Neil, 1986 
Mr. and Mrs. J.A. Morano 
Mr. and Mrs. Donald R. Musselman 
Dr. and Mrs. Gaudencio S. Obial 
Mr. and Mrs. Vincent P. O'Connell 
Bernard and Mary Odoy 
Mr. and Mrs. Agostinho Oliveira 
Mr. and Mrs. Roger K. O'Reilly 
David M. Phelan 
Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Rego 
Alphonse S. Rinaldi 
J. Kenneth Roos, Jr. 
Walter Rossi 
Manuel San Juan, Jr 
Frank J. Santo 

Dr. and Mrs. William L. Schemmel 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Shields 
Mr. and Mrs. Marvin T. Silverstein 
William and Peg Sitar 
Mr. and Mrs. Donald E. Slike 
Mr. and Mrs. David Watson Smith 
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Spada 
Mr. and Mrs. William J. Sullivan 
Mr. and Mrs. Vincent J. Tague 



410 / Patrons 



Mr. and Mrs. Charles G. Woram 
Mr. and Mrs. Shiro Yamazaki 
John F. Zamparelli, Esquire 

SILVER 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter J. Barry 

Anibal M. Capella 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter J. Cline 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Connelly, Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. Victor DeMedeiros 

Michael G. Economos 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Ferrera 

Dr. and Mrs. Arnold Fiascone 

Dr. and Mrs. Rolando G. Guerra 

Mr. and Mrs. T. Richard Kennedy 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph P. Kiley 

C.R.P. Meyjes 

Tilmon and Marguerite Rhodes, Proud 

Parents of Leigh T. Rhodes 
Mrs. Barbara F. Sanchez 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Seminerio 

(Tristani) 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Tobin 



m 




m 



> 

o 



o 

TO 
CO 



Patrons / 411 



CO 




o 



< 



PATRONS 

George T. Abdow 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Adams 

Mr. and Mrs Frederick Adgate 

Mrs. Edward J. Ahern 

Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Aiello 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Ailinger 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Albright 

Mr. and Mrs. Guy S. Alessi 

Carmen and Modesto Alonso 

Jose A. Alvarez 

Dr. and Mrs. Albert Amalfitano 

Robert A. Andreotti 

Mr. and Mrs. George E. Andrews 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Andrews 

Rafael I. Aponte 

Mr. and Mrs. Leo J. Archambault Parents of Ann, Class 

of 1985 
Mr. and Mrs. Ivo Areias 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph R. Arena 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard T. Arkwright 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Arrigoni 
I raj Assefi, M.D. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Baierlein 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur D, Bancroft 
Mr. and Jrs. John E. Baney 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Baratta 
Mr. and Mrs. W. Peter Barnes 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Battaglia 
Jack and Joan Beam 
Mr. and Mrs. Rene C. Beauchemin 
Andrew Beke,M,D. 
Arthea E. Bellavance 
Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Benedict 
Mr. and Mrs. Norman R. Beretta 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Bernard 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard B. Bessette 
Stella V. Reid-Best 
Ed and Betty Bick 
John and Nancy Bickford 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Bicki 
Mr. and Mrs. John P. Birtweil 
Deacon and Mrs. Roland J. Blier 
Mr. and Mrs. Andrew R. Bombara 
Cy Boroff 

Mr. and Mrs. E. Peter Bouchard 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert L Boyd 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Brazzamano 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul A. Breen 
Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Breiner 
Harry L. Bricker, Jr., Esquire 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur C. Brooks 
Mr, and Mrs. John J. Browne 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bruzek 
Dr. and Mrs. Richard A. Buckingham 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Burger 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Burke 
Rev. and Mrs. Alfred W. Burns 
Barbara E. Butterworth 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Cahill 
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Calderone 
Dr. and Mrs. John L. Callinan 



412 / Patrons 



Dr. and Mrs. N. Camardese 
Dr. and Mrs. Jesse Cardellio 
James and Barbara Carney 
Mr. and Mrs. Francis J. Carr, Jr. 
Herbert F. Carroll, Class of 1936 
Dr. and Mrs. George E. Cartier 
Joseph F. Castaldi 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Castro 
Mr. and Mrs. Carl J. Caterini 
Mr, and Mrs. John Cempe 
Jorge S. Cerruti, M.D., PC 
MX. and Bob Chandler, Classes of 1950 and 1952 
Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Chung 
William Chung 

Mr. and Mrs. Edgar R. Civitello 
Mr. and Mrs. Timothy Clifford 
Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Coccoluto 
Mr. and Mrs. Francis Colangelo 
Dr. and Mrs. Nicholas A. Conforti 
Mr. and Mrs. John J. Conroy, Jr. 
Charles F, and Mae Convery 
Mrs. Ann M, Cooney 
Mary G. Cooper 
Ettore and Lena Coppola 
Dr. and Mrs. John J. Corcoran 
Robert and Elizabeth Corcoran 
Robert E. Cormack 
Thomas and Barbara Cosgrove 
Mr. and Mrs. Anthony A. Cottiero 
The Coudriet Family 
Francis J. and Nancy Crane 
Donald and Jeanne Craven 
Mr, and Mrs. Ronald A. Creamer 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur T. Curran 
Mr. and Mrs. Francis H. Curtin 
Francis Burrell-Cusack 
The Cutrone Family 
Ed and Rose Ann Cyr 
Mr, and Mrs, Paul F. Daly 
Mr, and Mrs. Roger Daly 
Noble and Thelma Davis 
Mr. and Mrs. John V. Degoes 
Mr. and Mrs. William J. Delayo 
Mr. and Mrs. A.W, DeLisi 
Dr. and Mrs, Salvatore A. DeLuca 
James E. Depies 
Henry and Marilyn DePlaza 
Mr. and Mrs. William DesGrosseilliers 
Mr. and Mrs. Clarke Devereux 
Dale and Bette Dickerson 
Mr. and Mrs. James A. DiCorpo 
Mr, and Mrs, Robert K. Doherty 
William and Jeanne Doherty 
Mr. and Mrs Thomas F. Donahue 
Mr, and Mrs. Paul Drummond 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Duffy 
The Duncan Family 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Dunford and Family 
Jerry and Jeanne Dunn 
Dr. John J.W, Dunn 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul R. Dunn 
Mr. and Mrs. James J. Dunseith 



> 



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O 




CO 



Patrons / 413 



CO 




o 



< 



Mr. and Mrs. James L. Durkin 

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Earle and Family 

Karen A. Elicone 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul G. Ellinghaus 

Joseph and Elva Elsman 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel H. Emerson 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard English 

Dr. and Mrs. Manfred Ernesti 

Dr. and Mrs. Austin Errico 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Estevez 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Ettore 

Don and Dela Factor 

Gordon William Fair 

Chester V. Fantozzi 

Nancy Cartnick Fay, Class of 1962 

Kevin P. Ferguson 

Dr. and Mrs. Francisco Fernandez M.D. 

Mr. and Mrs. John E. Ferren 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul J. Fidler 

Mr. and Mrs. S. Philip Filippone 

The Fitz-Gerald Family 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard B. Fitzpatrick 

Mr. and Mrs. William Fleno 

Edward B. Flaherty 

Dr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Flaherty 

Mr. and Mrs. James L. Flynn, Jr. and Family 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard L. Flynn 

Mrs. Richard J. Foley 

Mr. and Mrs. A, Fontaine 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas S. Foulkes 

Mr. and Mrs. Gerard G. Frost 

Mr. and Mrs, Gregory F. Fulgione, Jr. 

James T. Gahan 

Mr. and Mrs, Joseph R. Gal lagan 

Mr. and Mrs. George W. Gallant 

Mr. and Mrs. John P. Galvin 

Mr, and Mrs. Anthony Gamberdella 

Mr. and Mrs. John R. Garbarino 

Mrs. Samuel R. Gargano 

Louis R. Gaudio, M.D. 

Dr. and Mrs. Salvatore Gengaro 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. George 

Dr. and Mrs. Jacob Gerend 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis D. Germani 

Dr. and Mrs. James R. Giambalvo 

Mr, and Mrs. Frank Gianoukos 

John and Janet Gieseiman 

Mr. and Mrs. James J. Gillis, Jr, 

Mrs. Barbara A. Gindhart 

Paul and Joyce Ginouves 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael O. Glynn 

Kenneth and Kaye Gnazzo and Family 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Goldberg 

Dr. and Mrs. Cesar I. Gonzales 

Don and Sylvia Gonsalves 

Ralph and Judith Good 

John and Alice Goode 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Grady 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard L. Graff 

Mr. and Mrs. William M. Gramaglia 

George and Dionisia Grammas 

Sara Jane Greenblott 



414 / Patrons 



Don and Marjorie Griffin 

Richard and Harriet Gurski 

Judith Nisius Hagan 

Mr. and Mrs. John B. Hagner 

Mr. and Mrs. Marcel E. Hardy 

Mr, and Mrs. Arthur Harvey, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Hastings, Jr. 

The George J. Haufler Family 

Jim and Joan Healy 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Heaps 

Mr. and Mrs. John Hefele 

Mr. and Mrs. Bruce P. Helmes 

Dr. and Mrs. Pierre Helou 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Hendrzak and Family 

Mr. and Mrs. John J.C. Herlihy 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Hildreth, Jr. 

Don and Eileen Hill 

Mr. and Mrs. L.J. Hochheiser 

Mr, and Mrs. Robert Hockenhull 

William Drew Hoffman 

Mr. and Mrs. John P. Hogan 

Mr. and Mrs. Alan E. Holden 

Mr. and Mrs. James E. Honan 

Mr. and Mrs, Richard Hopkins 

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Horrigan 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Francis Houlihan 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter D. Howley 

Ikon Communications Consultants, Inc. 

Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Irwin 

Mr. and Mrs. James C. Israel 

Dr. and Mrs. Charles A. Janda 

Leonard and Jo Ann Jarmusz 

Mr. and Mrs. Warren W. Johnson 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip M. Judge 

Henry Kakol 

Whdeh and Frances Kaliff 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul J. Kanzler 

John J. Kaplan 

Mr, and Mrs. Thomas E. Karpick 

The Karpowic Family 

Mr, and Mrs. Robert Kavey 

Maryann Keane 

John and Mary Keating 

Mr, and Mrs, Thomas C. Kelly 

Dr, and Mrs, James Kennedy 

Mr. and Mrs. John Keohane 

John and Patricia King 

Dr, and Mrs. John A. Kline 

Willaim and Alice Klucsarits 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Knudsen, Jr, 

Otto Kossuth 

Peter Krehbiel, Esquire 

Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Kuliga 

Mr, and Mrs. Robert P. Kuntz 

Francis E. Lake, Jr, 

Mr. and Mrs. S. Arthur Lamia 

Mr, and Mrs. Michael A. Lanza 

Craig and Madeline Larson 

Duncan L. LaVigne 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Lavin, Jr. 

Alix Lawlor 

Peter J. Lawlor, Class of 1988 



> 



TO 
O 




CO 




Patrons / 415 



CO 




o 



< 

Q_ 



Albert and Dorothy Lawrence 

Gary F. and Carol A. LeMiere 

Mr. and Mrs. John J. Lee 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Leitner 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald L. Leone 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles R. Leslie 

Roger and Margaret Lewis 

Attorney and Mrs. Thomas E. Lilly 

Dr. and Mrs. Paul T.C. Lin 

Mr. and Mrs. John M. Long 

Mr. and Mrs. Vincent H. Lucas 

Charles and Theresa Lutz 

Carolyn A. Lynch and Family 

Mr. and Mrs. John C. MacKeen 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl J. Maddaleni 

Mr, and Mrs. J. Bernard Madeira 

Mrs. Lewis A. Madley, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence L. Maffei 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Magnotta 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Mahedy, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Roger W. Maldonado 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Malone 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Moloney 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Martel 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph P. Mascolo 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Massaro, Jr. 

Peter and Christina Mattimoe 

Dr. and Mrs. Raymond M. McCaffrey 

Mr. and Mrs. William J. McCahill 

LTC and Mrs. William D. McCarthy 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. McCullagh 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel J. McDonald 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P. McDonald 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard McDonnell 

Mr. and Mrs. William G. McGagh 

John and Sheila McGarrahan 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph J. McGee, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. William F. McGrath 

Mrs. Ann Marie McHale 

James McKaige 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert T, McLaughlin 

David and Ann McMahon 

Mr. and Mrs, John B. McNamara 

Mr. and Mrs, Joseph A. McVey 

Dr. and Mrs. Donald Meccia 

Mr. and Mrs. Fredrick Stewart Meils 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond R. Mendel 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry G. Miller 

Mr. and Mrs, Richard C Milligan 

Mr, and Mrs. Walter A. Mis 

Mr. and Mrs, Edward B. Mitchell 

Mrs. Jennifer Moe 

Joseph and Joyce Mollicone 

John L. Molloy, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin P. Montengro, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jaime Gomez Mora 

Mr. and Mrs. James J. Moran 

Robert S. Morton 

Dr. and Mrs. William Mort 

Mr. and Mrs. Timothy Moynihan 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles G. Mullin 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas C Mulry 



Patrons 



Mr. and Mrs. Donald J. Muraca 

Mr. and Mrs. Matthew G. Murphy 

Dr. and Mrs. Raymond L.H. Murphy, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Murphy 

Mr. and Mrs. Lee Murray 

Francis C. Myers 

Mr. and Mrs. James Neary 

Jack and Patricia Nee 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter J. Neppl 

Mr. and Mrs. Manuel M. Neronha, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. William F. Nicholson 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter A. Noone 

Tom and Marilyn Nunan 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas O'Brien 

Mr. and Mrs. James F. O'Connor 

Mr, and Mrs. Michael N. O'Connell 

Mrs. Ann T. O'Donnell 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter D. O'Hearn, Jr. 

Mr. Edward F. O'Keefe 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Oleary 

Dr. and Mrs. William A. O'Neil 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. O'Neill 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip F. Orzell 

Francis T. Pachler, Jr. 

Elsie Marie Padellaro 

Mr. and Mrs. Pat Page 

Mr, and Mrs. Charles Paquette 

Mr. and Mrs. John B. Parker 

Dr, and Mrs. William Parks 

The Pasqualone Family 

Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Pelletier 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Penezic 

Desmond F. Perschall 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred F. Peterson 

Dr. and Mrs. Joseph P. Petrus 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph E. Piazza 

Dr. and Mrs. John A. Pietropaoli 

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Pleus 

Mr, and Mrs. James W. Pratt 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Pushkal 

Dr. and Mrs. David Quigley 

Mr. and Mrs. Martin J. Racanelli 

Mr. and Mrs. Benedict Raia 

Mr, and Mrs. Arthur H. Rapoza 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Rath 

Mr, and Mrs, F. Ian Ravenscroft 

Bob and Pat Redmond 

Mr, and Mrs. Clarence J. Reed 

Mr, and Mrs. Leon Stanley Regent 

Richard W. Renehan 

Dr. Louis E. Rentz 

Allan and Patricia Rice 

Paul C, Richardson III 

Mr, and Mrs. Eugene J. Richter 

Mr. and Mrs, Douglas Rigney, Jr, 

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Rinella, Jr. 

Dr, and Mrs. George Rioseco 

Mr. and Mrs. Chester A. Risio 

George and Martha Robey 

Mr. and Mrs. Clinton W. Robins, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gerard D, Roche, Jr. 

Phil and Toni Rogers and Family 



> 



TO 

O 




CO 



Patrons / 417 



CO 




o 



< 



Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Roselli 

Jack and Alana Rosshirt 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Rossi 

Dr, and Mrs. G. Rubacky 

Mrs. Leo Rukstalis, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Rupprecht 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Russell 

John P. Sadowey 

Marqueses de Salinas 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Samtangelo 

Nancy M. Schnebly 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Schuessler 

John Schwegman 

Joseph Schwegman 

Rachel Scocozza 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Scott 

Alton F. Seidl 

Joe and Judy Seiler 

Lyman and Elizabeth Sheats 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Sheehan, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Sheehan 

Gerald and Carol Sheldon 

Mr. and Mrs. Victor F. Sheronas, Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. Philip B. Sibilia 

Sal and Mary Jane Signore 

Dr. and Mrs. James Sileo 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Silva and Family 

Mr, and Mrs. Manuel J. Simoes 

Mr. and Mrs. Vincent Silt 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry W. Skerry ,Sr, 

Mr. and Mrs, James A. Smida 

Mr, and Mrs. William Smiy 

Dr. and Mrs. Nicholas Smyth 

John and Eilen Soffey 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Louis Somers 

Mr, and Mrs. Thomas J. Staley, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ernst Stalzer 

Mr. and Mrs. E. Standring 

Mr. and Mrs. James V. Stanton 

Mr. and Mrs. David A. Steinbrink 

Mr. and Mrs. Alan Steiner 

Dr. and Mrs. William Stephan 

L.G, Stoney 

Mr. and Mrs, Howard Strachan 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel F. Sullivan 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry D, Sullivan 

Mr, and Mrs. James J. Sullivan, Jr. 

Mr, and Mrs. Richard J. Sullivan 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert R. Sullivan 

Attorney and Mrs. Terence A. Sullivan 

Mr. and Mrs. Timothy F. Sullivan 

Albert and Louise Supple 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Sweeney 

Mr. and Mrs. Julius Swirski 

Mr. and Mrs. William S. Szymarski, Sr. 

Frank and Barbara Tanki 

Gene and Avis Thielman 

John and Pat Thornton 

Mr, and Mrs. Stephen Tilton 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Toomey 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul R. Topping 

Dr. and Mrs. Michael F. Tota 



418 / Patrons 



Lecil and Betty Townsend 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Travers 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Turcofre 

Mt. and Mrs. Thomas A. Turley 

Mr. and Mrs. John Tyler 

Sal and Gail Uccello 

George H. Vail 

Ernesto H. Vail 

Ernesto and Mary-Jane Valadez 

Mrs, Saverio Vasile 

Dr. and Mrs. Laurence E. Vienneau 

Dr. and Mrs. Pedro Vincenty 

Dr. and Mrs, Joseph Vitale 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph L. Walinski 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. Walker 

Thomas H. and Madeline E. Wall 

Mr. and Mrs. James J. Ward 

Mr. and Mrs. Einard M. Warpula 

Mary P. Wasmer 

Mr. and Mrs. Pedro Wasmer 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Webster 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert F. Whealon 

Mr, and Mrs. J. Wayne Wheeler 

Rev, and Mrs. G. David White 

Mrs, William J. White 

Bert and Barbara Why 

Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Williams 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Wissier 

Mr. and Mrs. Fon Shew Wong 

Chung Hin and Mee Kuen Wong 

The Thomas Woodka Family 

Roberto and Rosie Wys 



> 



70 

o 




CO 



Patrons / 419 











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The Honors Program 

of 
The College of Arts and Sciences 

extends its heartiest 
Congratulations and Godspeed 

to the 
Class of 1985 



420 




Boston College Alumni Association 

Alumni Hall 

74 Commonwealth Avenue 

Chestnut Hill, MA 02167 

617-552-4700 



Services and programs for alumni include: Football 
Events, Reunions, Address Updates, Coordinating Class 

Notes information, Travel Programs, Continuing 
Education and more. 

The Alumni Association is your link to the University. 



THE BOSTON COLLEGE 

ALUMNI 

ASSOCIATION 

WELCOMES THE CLASS OF 

1985 

TO THE ALUMNI FAMILY 



Congratulations 

and Best Wishes to 

the Class of 1985 




Deans and Faculty 

of the School of 

Nursing 




Boston College 
Computer Store 

Congratulations to the 
Class of 1985 

God Bless You 



421 




War* *w« 
A**** ■"■€ 



«5JS Wrf 






boston college !s independent student weekly 



WISHES 

GRADUATING SENIORS 

THE BEST 

OF LUCK! 



If you would like to continue 
receiving The Heights in the 

future, send a subscription 
request to McElroy 113. 



WJSgl 



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422 




Compliments of 

the Bellarmine Law 

Academy 



To the members of 

the Student Program 

in Admissions 

"Thanks for all 
your help" 

From the entire 
Admissions staff 

and the Class of 
1989! 




Compliments 
of the 

BOSTON COLLEGE 

ATHLETIC 

ASSOCIATION 



423 



Congratulations to the Class of 1985 

From 

Justin C. Cronin 

Lori Egan 

John J. Neuhauser 

Virginia O'Malley 

Nancy Samya 

The School of Management 



Congratulations and Best Wishes 

To The Class of 1985 

From 

Yearbook Associates 

Official School Photographers 

Millers Falls, MA 



424 



The Deans and 

Faculty 

of the 

School of Education 



Salute the 
Class of 1985 



The 
Cross and Crown 

Senior Honor Society 

of the 

College 

of 

Arts and Sciences 



Congratulations to the Class of 1985 
From 

Carol Hurd Green, Associate Dean 

Marie McHugh, Associate Dean 

Paul C. Doherty, Associate Dean 

William B. Neenan, S.J., Dean 

The College of Arts and Sciences 



425 



Prayerful Best Wishes 

to 
The Graduates of 1985 

from 
The Jesuits of Boston College 



y 




St. Mary's Hall as it appeared in the 1934 SuP Turri. 



426 







Best Wishes to the 

Future and 

Thanks tor the 

Memories 




If 




1 


Reverend Edward J. 

Hanrahan, S.J. 

Dean of Students 




I^^Mm ^^^^^ 


"1 pardon all things to the 
spirit of liberty." 

There is a bit of the 
Heisman in all of you. 




OF BOSTON COLLEGE 



Congratulations to the 
Class of 1985! 

Let us help you 

make your career goals 

a reality! 



We encourage your continuing use of our 

services as alumni. 

Join the Alumni Career Network 



427 



Congratulations and Best Wishes 

to the Class ot 1985 

from 

The Boston College Bookstore 







428 




Congratulations 

Class of 1985! 

from 

The "Rat" 



To 

The Class of 1985 

Congratulations 

and 

Best Wishes 



Office of Student Programs 
and Resources 



Pencil 

CONVENIENCE FOOD STORE 



CONGRATULATIONS 

BOSTON COLLEGE 

CLASS OF 1985 

WE'RE OPEN 365! 
DAYS A YEAR 



429 



Compliments of 

Hunter Publishing Company 

P.O. Box 5867 

Winston-Salem, North 

Carolina 27113 




430 



The Staff of 

Sub Turri 

Congratulates 

the Class of 

1985 



431 



Index 



(Index) 




Sports 


42 


Academics 


232 


Boston Magazine 


44 


Academy of Sciences 218 


Boston University 


46 


Accounting Academy 218 


Bronstein, Eugene 


244 


Ads 


420-431 


Buckley, William 


255 


Advertising Club 


209 


Bull Market 


30 


Aerosmith 


34 


Bull Sessions 


299 


AHANA 


228 


Cafe Paradiso 


28 


Air Band 


184 


Caldwell, Sarah 


34 


Aku-Aku 


28 


Cambridge 


24 


All Nighters 


296 


Campus Crusade 




Amnesty International 224 


for Christ 


217 


Armenian Club 


228 


Campus Pub 


183 


Asian Students Club 228 


Career Center 


221 


Association for Women in 


Cars, The 


34 


Management 


218 


Ceglarski, Len 


108 


Air Band 


202 


Cercle Francois, Le 


228 


Bargains 


305 


Chapman, Douglas 


174 


Basketball, men's 


90-97,126 


Charles River 


34,147 


Basketball, 




Chemistry Caucus 


218 


women's 


88,89,126 


Chestnut Hill 


22 


Bellarmine Law 




Children's Museum 


36 


Academy 


218,437 


Chinatown 


28 


Black Student Forum 228 


Chorale 


202,433 


Blood Drive 


207,212 


Christmas 


326 


Bookstore 


169 


Circle K 


212 


Boston, 




Circolo Italiano 


228,434 


Bruins 


42 


Class Favorites 


186 


Celtics 


42,43 


Cleveland Circle 


27,144 


Commons 


37,48,49 


Closing 


442-448 


Dark Side 


39 


Colleges 


47 


Events 


32 


Comedy Connection 34 


Garden 


43,91 


Communication 


385 


Globe 


45 


Commuter Committee 436 


Historic 


18 


Computers 


167,36. . 


Media 


45 


Computer Science 




Marathon 


42,190 


Academy 


218 


Red Sox 


43 


Conklin, Bob 


71 


Skyline 


40 


Connors, Virginia 


72 




Activities funding Commltte 
Allegn, Ellen Heavey 



- Hugh McDonald. Manna R Bagley. Richard Caiaprese (Chairman). Monica 




Cross & Crown Row 1 — Kelly A. Walsh [Marshal), Mark DiVincenzo (Marshal). Tom Fennell (Knight Comman- 
der), Fr. Bill Neenan SJ (Dean. College of Arts & Sciences). Andrea Mullin (Marshal). Margaret Langan (Marshal) 
Row 2 — Edward J. Capobianco, Brian Flanagan. Julie Ann Kulas. Barry Goldberg, Annie Mannoccio. Bnan 
Flanagan, Julie Ann Kulas, Barn/ Goldberg, Annie Marinaccio, Janet Fisher. Maura Nloone. Jane Papodemet- 
riou, Theresa Chmara. Mindy Kail. Dorothy Breen. Leslie Samuelrich. Row 3 — Christopher S Canning. Lonnie 
Quinn. Ruth A. Pryor. Allison E. Rich, Vicki Pavlick, Maureen C Tobin, Colleen Seibert, Barbara Veale. Claire 
Gallagan, Mary M. D'Agostino. Wendy Khentigan. Row d — Daniel Fitzpcrrrick. J Kurtyka. John Constantine. 
Kevin P. Supples, Michael F. Kennedy, Kevin P Barry, John V, Bologna. Linda Langford. Mary McGinn. Mokis 
Latridis. 




NAACP Executive Board Row 1 — Anthony Benjamin (Vice-President). Tanya Davis (Corresponding Secre- 
tary). Maya Handwork (President). Kelly Francis (Recording Secretary). Paul Lewis (Treasurer). 



Math Society Row 1 — Ned Rosen (Faculty Adviser). Donna Somers (Vice-President), James Marner (President). 
Annie Marinaccio (Treasurer). Pamela Jordan (Secretary). Row 2 — Barbara Helmes. Mary M D Agostino. Lisa 
Hartunian, Dianne Town. Laurine Ghent, Pamela Albino. Row 3 — Steve Doucette. Eric Klingler. Mark Amalfitano. 
David Sullivan. 



432 / Index 




Sailing Club Row 1 — Joe Stanganelli, Kevin Thornton, Mike Berarducci , Robert Cerny, Simon McGee. Row 2 
Mary Clare Cooper, Joann Martin. Kim Rowe, Tracey Linegar. 




Voices of Imanl Row 1 — Delender A. McCants, Jack B. Dadlani (Vice President), Janet E, Morgan (President), 
Pierre F. Monette, Jr. (Secretary), Vickie R. McDaniel (Recording Secretary]. Row 2 — Dineen Haywood, Shawn 
Norton, Maya L. Handwerk, Phylis Austin, Michelle Smith, Charmaine J. Mattis, Andrea Barnett, Marjorie Beauvoir. 
Row 3 — John Julian, Barry Goldberg, Larry Delong, Maurice A. Haynes. Missing — Bridget Morgan, Nina Rivera 
(Treasurer), Donna Hubbard, Eugene Karbut, Cheryl Miller. 



Index 



(index continued) 

Conversations 385 

Cooking 314 

Copley Place 39 

Counseling 221 

Cross Country 72 

Curry College 47 

Dance Ensemble 201 

Decorating 325 

Democratic Club 224 

Derba, Carlo 180 

Dorm Life 163 

Douglas, Frederick 29 

Drugs 192 
Dustbowl 136,190,267 

Eagles Nest 213 

Eagle Pride 282 

Eastwood, Clint 45 

Economics Caucus 218 

Elasser, Deborah 178 

Election 322 

Employees 371 
Environmental Action 

Center 224 

Escape 293 

Ethnicity 28 

Eurythmics 34 
Evening College Senate 218 

Fahey, Joseph R. 12 

Fads 165 

Fallon, Ann 71 

Faneuil Hall 30 

Fashion 346 

Fenway Park 43 

Fiedler, Arthur 34 

Field Hockey 76,77 

Filene's 30 
Film Board 209,435 

Finance Academy 218 



Fine Arts Union 218 

Fishman, Donald 243 

Flutie, Doug 56,57,60.61 
64,65,68,108.122,123,128 
169.248.282,339 
Flynn, Raymond L. 4 



Flynn, William 

Fogg Museum 

Food 

Football 
Cotton Bowl 
Heisman Trophy 
Past Bowls 
Team Photo 

Foreign Study 

Freshmen 



6 

36 

141 

54-69,126 

122.123.373 

128.282 

68 

65 

251,363 

318 



Friday's Restaurant 27 
Friends 291.301,345,375 

Frittering 285 

Future 148 

Galway, James 34 

Garaventi, Jim 71 

Gardner Museum 36 

Gasson 167 
Geology and Geophysics 

Club 218 

German Academy 228,435 

Godiva Chocolates 32 

Go-Go's 34 

Gold Key Society 212 

Golf, men's 74,126 

Greycliff House 213 

Griffin, William 240 

Grocery Shopping 145 

Guadalaharry's 28 

Guardian Angels 38 

Guess 165 

Haley House 213 

Halloween 281 




Chorale Row 1 — Amy Yargrough (Social Director), Pam Risio (Public Relations). Patricia Jacques (Treasurer). 
Rebecca Draeger (Women s Secretary). Row 2 — Tony Falotico (Concert Organization). Glen Smith (Librarian), 
Daniel Kelly (President), Jim Mroz (Men's Secretary) 



Political Science Club Row 1 — Maura Ncone (President), Kathleen McNamara (Secretary). Christopher 
Hanley (Public Relations). Row 2 — Laura A. Incalcaterra (Vice-President), William J Cohane (Treasurer), 
Robert Gallon (Advertising). 



Index / 433 



Index 



(index continued) 




La Union Latina 


228 


Hanrahan, Edward 


8 


Lacrosse 


124,125 


Harvard Coop 


24 


Larkin, James P. 


240 


Harvard Yard 


46 


Law, Bernard F. 


32 


Hasty Pudding Club 


34 


Levine, Joseph 


252 


Hayden Planetarium 


36 


Lewis, Huey 


34 


Head of the Charles 


147 


Limo Races 


170 


Heights, 




Lobel, Robert 


44 


Inc. 127,198,232,308 


Local Communities 


71 


Heineman, John 


253 


MacDonald, Mike 


71 


Hellenic Club 


218 


Magic Pan 


28 


Herald, The Boston 


45 


Mainstage 


223 


Hillell 


217 


Mass 


376 


History Caucus 


218 


Mass PIRG 


436 


Hockey, men's 108-113,127 


MBTA 


20 


Hockey, women's 


106,107 


Marketing Academy 218 


Homesick 


276 


M*A*S*H 


45 


Hong Kong 


28 


MIT 


46 


Hot spots 


193 


Mathematics Society 218 


Houston, Amanda 


255 


Matthieu, Charles 


175 


Hughes, Richard 


247 


Mendel Club 


218,437 


Institute of Contemporary 


McCarthy, John A. 


240 


Art 


36 


McDargh, John 


242 


Intramurals 


87,88 


McDonald, Jack 


100,102 


Investment Club 


218 


McElroy 


213 


Irish Society 


228 


McManon 




Jackson, Michael 


45 


MFA 


34 


Jesuits 


317 


Middle Eastern Students 


Jesuits, Deceased 


240 


Association 


228 


Job hunting 


357 


Mod-life 


138,163 


JFK Library 


36 


Moms 


311 


Jones, Harlan 


255,446 


Monan, Donald J. 


248,256 


Jordan Marsh 


30 


Movie Loft 


45 


Juniors 


302 


Muchies 


321 


Karate Club 


437 


Murray House 


213,434 


Kelly, Bill 


71 


Music 


358 


Kelly, Joe 


181 


NAACP 


212 


King, Melvin 


32 


Newbury St 


27 


Kreeft, Peter 


246 


New England 







ill JTIJJW 

„. j ii I jin 




^Ak 




I 

1 * i 1 



11 Clrcolo Itallano Row 1 — Suzanne Arena (Co-President). Carlo Marin (Co-President). Laura Pankey. Row 2 
— Susan Healy. Kelli Costa (Vice-President). 




Murray Home Commuter Center Row 1 — Karen Brotoski Row 2 — Michael Collins. Tom Shannon 




OISA — Antonio Torio, Maite Ballester, Manuel Matchana, Emilia M. Stance Javier Celaya 



434 / Index 



School of Management Senate Row 1 — Gene Bronstein. Nancy Capozzi, Brian Starsky. Denise Dunne, John 
Hage. Row 2 — Tnomas P. Garner. Karen McCabe. John J. Petosa 




German Club Row 1 — Ian Harris (President), Trudi Sie 
Robin Welssbach (Secretary), Valda Melngaills (Faculty / 
Rivera, Alyssa Heck. 



jmann (Vice-President), Michael O'Nell (Treasurer), 
■dvisor). Row 2 — Jone Leone. John Downey, Marisol 




O'Connell House Row 1 — Leo Melanson. 
McLaughlin. 



Jim De Corpo. Row 2 — John Fuchs. Jennifer Hanlon, Spidey 



Index 



(index continued) 




Rat 


365 


Aquarium 


36 


Registration 


313 


Newton Campus 


163 


Reservoir 


1 


Nick's Comedy Stop 


) 34 


Resident Assistants 


343 


Nieman Marcus 


32 


Restaurants 


26 


No Names 


141 


Roberts Center 


97 


North End 


28 


Rockwell 


334 


Nunez, Louis 


71 


Rolincik, Paul 


71 


Nurse Capping 


236 


Sailing Club 


433 


Observer 


198,308 


School of Education 




O'Connell House 


215,435 


Senate 


218,437 


O'Connell, John 


71 


School of Management 


Off campus Housinc 


I 144 


Senate 


218,434 


OISA 


228,434 


School of Nursing 




O'Neill Library 


234,248 


Senate 


218,437 




267,446 


Scoreboard 


126,127 


O'Neill, Thomas P. 


234,248 


Scorpion Bowl 


28 


Orpheum 


34 


Screw Your Roommate 1 70 


Ostrowski, Caroline 


180 


Senior Portraits 


289-385 


OSPAR 


227 


Senior Life 


152 


Paraprofessional 




Senior Week 


170 


Leaders 


218 


Shaw House 


213 


Partying 


135,381 


Shear Madness 


34 


Patrons 


408-419 


Shopping 


30 


Performing Arts 


34 


Silva, Carlos 


71 


Personnel Management 


Ski Team 


114,115 


Association 


218,433 


Skiing, Recreational 


161 


Peterson, Mary Helen 72 


Slavic and Eastern 




Pet Peaves 


279 


Circle 


228 


Phoenix, The 


45 


Smith, Chris 


71 


Pi Mu Epsilon 


435 


Snow, Kevin 


56 


Pine Manor 


47 


Soccer, Men's 


83,126 


Plex 


150,293 


Soccer, Women's 


78 


Portraits 


289-385 


Sociology Caucus 


218 


Procrastinating 


349 


South End 


28 


Purple Shamrock 


28 


Spanish Club 


228 


PULSE 


212 


Sports Spotlight 


45 


Quad 


329 


Spring 


368 




Him Board Row 1 — M. Eileen Taylor (Public Relations Director), Bruce Balon (Secretary), Richard Audet 
(organizational Director), Michael Nyklewicz (Chairperson), Mark Amalfitano (Publicity Director), Steve Parisi 
[Treasurer). Row 2 — Richard De Jordy, Laura Middleton, Andrea Beutner, Helen Rinella, Anne O'Malley. Patti 
Dentremont, Mike Russ, Lee Rizy. Row 3 — Mark Gudaitis, Brian Russo, J Douglas Hopper, Peter H. Beltran, 
Terrence E. Sullivan, John Goodwin, Sal DeLuca, Thomas Meisenbacher, William Lanza. 



PI Mu Epsilon Row 1 — Mary M. D'Agostino, David Sullivan, Pamela Albino. Row 2 — Lisa Hartunian, Donna 
Somers. Dianne Town, Annie Marinaccio, Pamela Jordan, Barbara Helmes. Laurine Ghent. Row 3 — Eric 
Klingler, Steve Doucette, Mark Amalfitano 



Index / 435 



Index 



(index continued) 
Spring Break 190,331 

Strachan, Steve 56 

Student Admissions 204 

Student Council for 
Exceptional Children 212 
Student Ministry 217 

Student Jobs 159 

Studying 132 

Sub Turrl 198,382,436 

438-441 
Swimming, Men's 116,117,127 
Swimming, Women's 118,119 

127 
Table of Contents 2 

Tacelli, Ronald 254 



Tailgating 
Taylor, James 
Tennis, Men's 
Tennis, Women's 
Theme 

Theme Parties 
Theilman, Jeff 
Thurman, Tony 
Track and Field, 
Men's 

Track and Field, 
Women's 
Transfer Center 
Transit 

Trivial Pursuits 
Tuition 




100,101 

102,103 

221 

20 

337 

340 



Student Agencies Row 1 — Tenny Frost. James Fisherkeller. Mark Baptists. John Baratta (Chairman Christmas 
party committee), Lisa deMedeiros (co-manager BC Travel). Row 2 — Kelly Kossuth (Monoger Cheers!). Moura 
C. Contrata (Manager Help Unlimited). Gerry Woriarty (President). Stephen Bolger (Manage Publication and 
Advertising). Michelle Hanson. Laura Lufkin. 




Commuter Committee Row 1 — Dannielle Byda, Bonnie Powers. Martha Bagley (Executive Assistant), 
Laura Shannon (Co-Chairperson), Joseph Walter (Co-Chairperson), Ellen Heavey, Sue Mahoney. Row 2 — 
Terry Morreale, Mike Raskin, Martin Kane, Steve Calloe. Geoff Carroll. John E. Lee. Tom Shannon. 



Sub Turrl Row 1 — Makis latridis. Cheryl Cappucio. Geri Murphy, Kerstin Gnazzo. Robeta Blaz. Row 2 — Tim 
Bever. Chris Hanley. Tony Cammarota, Ramona McGee. Andy Ryan, George Nunno. Peter Klidoras. Tania 
Zielinski, Tom McMorran. Row 3 — Keith Gnazzo, John Boswell. Mimi Rehak. Colleen Seibert. Sue Spence. 
Deirdre Reidy. 




UGBC Senate Row 1 — Susan Rogler (Vice-President University Affairs). Deborah Mognotto (Vice-President 
Academics). Michelle Lagarce (Vice-President Finance). Jeff Thielman (President). Lou Helbling (Vice- 
President), Mana Harkins (Executive Secretary!. Row 2 — Glenn A. Gullno. Laura Shannon. Ellen Heavey. 
Kathleen Harkins. Janet Miller, Tom Grace. Kathy McNamara. Rich Calabrese. Monica Allegri, Rob 
Andrews. Marianne Allaire. Carol Concannon. Mary Grace Luke. Row 3 — Kevin Gates, Michelle Hanson, 
Donna Alcott, Steve Yoch, Joe Walter. Tom Shannon. Hugh McDonald. Daniel Fitzpatrick, Bob Boroff. 



Matt PIRO Row 1 — Mary E. Shanahan. Judith N. Gleba. Sharon A. Boyle, Leslie Samuelnch. Laune Strigel. 
Elisabeth A Parker. Julio A. Figueroa, Makis latridis. 



436 / Index 




Bellarmine Law Academy Row 1 

SJ. Joseph S. Gerbasi. 



- Mark Lavole, Jeffrey Witt. Row 2 — Thomas Meisenbacher, Fr, Mahoney. 



Index 



(index continued) 
Twilight Zone 
Tzianbos, Arthur 
UGBC 


45 
179 

197 


Week-ends 
Weeks, Jennifer 
Wegman, Carole 
Weinheimer, Eric 


177,190 

72 

10,227 

71 


UGBC Senate 


436 


WZBC 


209 


Upper Campus 
Vandalism 


163 
333 


World Hunger 
Committee 


217 


Voices of Imani 


433 


Women's Resource 




Volleyball 
Wave, The 


120 
165 


Center 
Yastrzemski, Carl 


217 
32 


WBCN 


44 


Young Americans 




WBZ-TV 


44 


for Freedom 


224 




School of Nursing Senate Row 1 — Patricia Curtin. Debra Manning. Wendy Shaw (President). Rosemary 
Lamacchia (Senate Secretary), Claire Durran. Laura Santangelo. Row 2 — Katherine Markey. Anna Navarro. 
Alice Dunn, Nancy Sammarco, Krista Durant. Paula Buehner. Bernadine Collins. Lisa Zimmerman. Betsy Easton, 
Liana Mancuso 



School ol Education Senate Row 1 — Josephine Limjuco. Margaret McDonnell. Katy Page (President). 
Ken Smith (Treasurer), Karen Twitchell (Vice-President) Row 2 — Amy Curcio. Tricio Griffin. Michele Bishop. 
Kerry Walsh. Cathy O'Brien, Marianne Soldo. Jean Emery, Sharon Frank, Carol-Ann Moloney 




Karate Club Row 1 — Linda O'Brien, Scott LaScola. Scott Farley, Kim Webster, John Guillemin. Jacqueline Blau, 
Tracey Kuliga, Lawrence Kusior, Liz Wall. Row 2 — Kara Renner, Pat Hannigan, Kevin Costello, Susan Winfield, 
Mary Tramontozzi. David Haabestad, Steve Yoch, Hugh Montague, Tom DeWinter, Judy Cunningham, Chris 
Shay. John Tichenor. Row 3 — Robert Hebeler, Joseph McNabb, Tyrone Edwards, George Goodliffe, Joseph 
Bouvier, Kevin I. Downey, Thomas Keer, Dan McKiernan 



Mendel Club Row 1 

Austin Errico, Frank DiCapra. Carrie Long. Row 3 
Brian McKinnon, Marivi Occhi ."" 



Helen Mc, Andreas Calianos (Presidents Hope Latterly. Row 2 — Chris Maiona. 
Paul Aswad. Theresa Capdoianco. Richard McGuire. 



Index / 437 



Tcmla Zlellntkl 

Copy Editor. 




Roberta Bias 

Bior Section Editor 



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Boston Editor 



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Rev. Leo McGovern, SJ 

Faculty Advisor 



A letter from the Editor 

Although it Is not traditional tot the Sub Turri editor to write a letter (the 
colophon had sufficed in recent years). 1 have decided to include a 
letter from the editor in this volume because the staff always looks for 
one and all they get is a dry, boring colophon. 

The staff of Sub Tunl 198S is to be congratulated. At the commence- 
ment of this academic year our staff was larger than ft had ever been in 
the past with well over 70 active members. As usual that number dwin- 
dled swiftly, The final figures found approximately 20 students contribut- 
ing regularly to the book and no more than 10 dedicated and 100% 
reliable. The following people therefore deserve to be thanked by every 
member of the senior class for putting in endless hours to create a book 
of memories with virtually no help from their classmates. The order is 
random for no one can be valued more than any other. Without all these 
people this book as you see It would have been impossible. 

Makis latrldis, Photography Editor, had the task of following in some of 
the best footsteps ever to walk through McElroy 103. His organizational 
abilities coupled with his photographic talent and knowledge allowed 
him to surpass the traditionally high level of photography Sub Turn has 
come to be known for In recent years. There Is no question that the black 
and white quality in this book Is at least twice as high as it was last year. 
Makls' personal emphasis of photography as art rather than Journalism 
gave Sub Turn not only a clean, fresh look but also a new section. Makls 
Is directly responsible for the creation of the Gallery section and should 
be thanked by all future photo editors for providing a place in Sub Turrl 
to present the best work rather than going to the Stylus. 

Tony Cammarota, Sports Editor, better known as the man stuck In the 
middle, faced the Incredible challenge of dealing with photographers 
who had to have two pages for their shot . . . 

"Just look at It, it's my best shot everlll" 

"But where are we going to put the story?" 

"You mean we have to leave room for a story on the page?" 

Such patience as Tony had was a rare gift, especially In McElroy 103. 

Cheryl Cappucclo took on the Job of Managing Editor in the middle 
of the fall term. Though Cheryl had only Joined the staff the previous 
spring, her natural sense of structure and incredible track record fa 
reliability made It clear that she would be the best person for the 
position, Her constant grinding through the phone calls, mail, contracts 
and answering machines truly earned her the title "managing" editor. 

Keith Gnazzo and Tania Zlelinskl, the Copy Editors, put in many 
thankless hours assigning, typing, editing, and proofing Just to be con- 
stantly nagged by photographers that there was too much writing in the 
book. Both Tania and Keith walked Into the positions in the fall and 
therefore had no time to make contacts with other writers. Tania, a 
senior, was responsible for the major structuring of each deadline, She 
made sure that the stories were assigned and turned In, Keith, our 
freshman godsend, had an uncanny knack for cranking out sports copy 
In "six seconds" flat. 

Peter Klldaras, chief Greek, was mainly responsible for driving me 
crazy. Peter was the head creative consultantto the book. (Wait . . . I've 
got a great Ideal) As required for any creative genius Peter had a 
tendancy to let Ideas develop over time . . . right up to the last second. 
But It Is such Ideas, developed with such painstaking care that give 
yearbooks the ability not only to remind students of the events that took 
place but to also let them relive the emotions of those times. 

Kerstin Gnazzo. Business Manager, was responsible for keeping all 
the above mentioned artists within the realm of reality better known as 
the budget. The trick was not easy for someone who at heart loved 
special effects and spot cctore just as much as those who were begging 
for the extra money to use them, especially given the fact that the exact 
amount available to be spent wasnt determined until the end of the 
year when the books were sold. Despite that, Kerstln's sharp sense of 
business and knowledge of the value of certain effects over others 
allowed her to keep the budget balanced and the book creative. She 
additionally aided in all areas of production from overall structure to 
reporting. 

Every senior should kiss the feet of Roberta Blaz, Senior Section Editor, 
who felt funny about being a junior. Were It not for her organization, hard 
word and Innovation there would have been a good chance that you 
would not have appeared In the book. And the end of the senior section 
deadline did not mark the end of Roberta's assistance as it so often 
does with senior section editors. She continued to help through the final 
deadline and sales. 

Geoff Why, Assistant Photography Editor, must be praised for all of his 
hard work both In shooting pictures and wotking in the dafcroom. As a 
freshman, he had no idea as to what was Involved In dedicating time to 
the yearbook. He learned fast and was always there when we needed 
him. 

Andy Ryan, Assistant Photography Editor, must also be commended 
for his dedication and hard work as should all the section editors. It Is 
those who take the responsibility on bit by bit throughout the year that 
keep the editor from going crazy. Kathy Reilly and Amy Fiocossinl 
handled the Activities section with virtually no prior knowledge of how a 
yearbook worked and did a fantastic job, thank you both. Colleen 
Selbert and Tom McMorran designed the Boston section and are to be 
congratulated for their fine work under the restraints of such a short 
deadline period. Father Leo McGovem, our advisor, cannot be 
thanked enough for his guidance and time. 

Ending an editor's letter has always felt like such a final stroke on the 
canvas, But as Peter Klidaras once emphasized you can never say. "This 
Is it. This Is my best. This book Is the best I can do. This is the extent of my 
ability." You have to be constantly able to learn and grow from what 
you've accomplished and go on to improve upon It. I am sure that Sub 
Tunl and the members of this year's staff will grow and Improve as a 
result of this production year, And while we may not be able to say, "This 
is it. This is the best." We gave it our best try. 



M-<- 



i^y^fjg. 



Colophon 



Volume 73 of Sub Turrl, the Yearbook of Boston Colleg 

Hunter Publishing Company of Winston-Salem, No 

Publishing representative was Arnold Lohmann, 2000 copies of 448 p<-- 

were printed using offset lithography process. The cover is mar. 

Lettering used on front cover and spine is Letraset BasK- 

stamped. Outer design is blind embossed. Inner desig- 

design by Chip Ryan, Heidi Becker, and Geri Murphy. The d 

tower is duplicated from the cover of Sub Turri 1966. Endsheets were pi 

a high gloss white stock in PMS 872 (Gold). Paper stock is 80 pour 

(pages 1-48) and dull pages (49-448). Primary typeface is Avant. Portrc 

was done by Harold Dodge of Yearbook Associates, Millers Falls, MA. SUB 

is a Yearbook Associates House account. 

The following pages were reproduced from Cipochrome II prints, pro- 
cessed by Boris Color Labs, Boston; 1-48, 66, 67, 70, 71, 74, 75, 78, 79, 130. 131, 
134, 135, 138, 139, 140, 141. 193-208, 230, 231, 234, 235, 238, 239. The following 
pages were reproduced from transparencies: 50, 51, 54, 55, 58, 59. 62. 63. 
260, 261 , 264, 265. Spot colors were applied to the following pages. 1 -15. PMS 
432, 18-48, PMS 301, 68, 69, 70, 71, 74, 75, 78, 79, PMS 348. Corine Michaels or 
staff photo used fa unknown photographers. Many lhanks to those photog- 
raphers not listed. The book's general format delineates the theme, "With 
Exceptional Class". The Boston College students have always strove to excell 
yet this year's class accomplished that with a sense of the classic style this 
book strove to portray. A strict three column layout was followed throughout 
the book with consistant 1/6" borders between all elements. 



Staff 



Geraldlne Tara Murphy 

Editor-in-Chief 

Kerstin R. Gnazzo 

Business Manager 

Cheryl A. Cappuccio 

Managing Editor 



Advisor 

Photography Editor 
Layout Editor 
Student Life Editor 
Senior Section Editor 
Sports Editor 
Photo-gnome 
Academics Editor 
Activities Editors 

Boston Editors 

Copy Editors 

Assistant Photography 

Assistant Sports Editors 



Rev. Leo McGovem, S.J. 

Makls latrldis 

George Nunno 

Delrdre Reldy 

Roberta Blaz 

Tony Cammarota 

Peter Klldaras 

Sue Spenee 

Amy Froeosslnl 

Kathy Reilly 

Colleen Selbert 

Tom McMorran 

Tania Zlelinskl 

Keith Gnazzo 

Editors Geotf Why 

Andy Ryan 

Tim Bever 

Mlml Rehak 



Semester Totals 

345 slices of pizza 

362 bags of Dorttos 

437 subs 

987 cups of coffee 

212 cartons of Marlboro Lights 

146 back rubs 

768 cassettes 
1.253 cans of tab 

582 cans of coke 
10.986 lines (of copy) 
4.897 shots [of Flutle) 
2,046 mugs {of seniors) 



Special Thanks 

We would like to extend a 
special thanks to: Father 
McGovem; Lee Pellegrini and 
the Office of Communica- 
tions; Carol Wegman and the 
Office of Student Programs 
and Resources; Reid Oslin; 
The Heights; Campus Police; 
Arnie Lohmann and Hunter 
Publishing Co.; Harold 
Dodge. Ed Ralicki, and Year- 
book Associates; 1985 Pa- 
trons, Benefactors, and Adver- 
tisers; the Class of 1985; our 
professors; the Murphy Clan, 
Lis©; Kathy; Jennie; Watson 
Mike & Cor; Barbara, Diane. 
Teresa; Aimie; Jay; Dave 
Schoefield; Joe Emanuel; 
Bruce; Richard; Cindy; 
Kouros; Rory; and Valentine. 
Copyright MCMCXXXV, Sub 
Turrl, The Yearbook of Bos- 
ton College. All rights re- 
served. No part of this pub- 
lication may be reproduced 
without expressed permission 
of the Editor-in-Chief. 



Sub Turri / 441 



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442 / Encore 




Encore / 443 



n the quest to live the school motto "Ever to 
Excell" Boston College reached the long time goal of opening the 
new Thomas P. O'Neill Jr. Library. The facility not only became a 
meca for research but also a buzzing social center for campus 
activities. Contrasting this pinnacle of achievement was the arrest 
of Harlan Jones, a Boston University student during a social justice 
lecture for what many students believed to be merely an exercise 
of his freedom of speech. As long as Boston College and its alumni 
continue to strive for excellence they must not only revel in the glory 
of their achievements but also confront and combat injustice 
across the world and at home. 









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Makis latridis 



444 / Encore 




Makis latridis 



Encore / 445 



hile Americans were caught up in the furor 
of the 1984 national election, historic for the candidacy of 
Geraldine Ferraro and Ronald Reagan's landslide victory, a 
travesty brewed in Ethiopia. Surrounded by the stolid security of 
the Boston College campus students comforted each other over 
the devestating reality that thousands of Ethiopians were 
starving each day. Financial aid flowed from every corner of 
the nation. As graduation loomed closer and closer students 
had to face the reality of leaving their home field. Finally 
stepping into the real world with their bachelors degrees 
tucked firmly under their belts it was up to each individual to 
decide how they would make their mark on the world. 



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446 / Encore 




Makis latridis 



Encore / 447 



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Supplement 







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450 / Supplement 




Supplement / 451 





Water Polo is a sport which has been 
well established in the US, yet only 
recently it has begun to grow in 
popularity due to the exposure it 
received in the LA Summer Olympic 
Games. Water polo is played in a pool 
thirty meters long by twenty meters wide 
and with a depth of at least six and a 
half feet. Each team consists of seven 
players, The object of the game is to 
swim the ball down the pool and score 
goals. Water polo is a fast and furious 
sport which involves lightning guick 
reactions, excellent ball handling skills, 
tremendous endurance and physical 
strength. 

Boston College Water Polo had a 
banner season this past fall. Lead by 
senior tri-captains, Brian Zeug, Gonzalo 
Fernandez, and Jeff Kenkel, the team 
finished with a 14-6-1 record. BC cap- 
tured the New England Division II East 
Crown and was invited to the New 
England Championships. They never left 
the top 10 poll all season. Despite an in- 
consistent performance at the New 
Englands, the Eagles were invited to 
attend the Division II Eastern Seaboard 



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Championships, but had to decline the 
honor due to a scheduling conflict with 
varsity swimming. BC was given a final 
ranking of 8th for the East Coast in Divi- 
sion II. A major highlight to be noted was 
the fact that BC soundly thrashed its 
green line rivals BU on three separate 
occasions. 

One of the keys to this year's success 
was the goaltending of senior Sean 
Joyce. He had the ability to turn a game 
completely around. Joe Stockwell was 
the team's offensive threat constantly 
giving opposing goalies fits. Leading 
scorers for the Eagles were Stockwell, 
Zeug, Fernandez, and sophomore 
standout Roberto "Where's my green 
card?" Ayala. The defense was 
anchored by Kenkel, Joyce, and sopho- 



more sensation, Tony Ryan. The 
freshman trio of Randy Teteak (Mr. 
Assist), Ed Burns, and John Arrascada 
were explosive and added incredible 
talent to the squad. All three were 
talented enough to be starters at one 
point during the season. Seniors Steve 
Sheehan and Matt Cronin played con- 
sistently and gave the Eagles much 
needed experience. Tom Boyle, Paul 
Goudreau, Tom Guilderson, Greg 
Greene, Tom Papadametrio, and Al 
DeLeo comprised the talented youth 
who were lighting the way towards a 
bright future for Boston College Water 
Polo. Friendship and team spirit flowed 
wonderfully with the competitive edge. 
Time has come today in Agua una 
Sanguinem Mittimus. 



452 / Supplement 




SCHEDULE AND RESULTS FOR FALL 1984 

Sept. 14 & 15: The BC Invitational 

BC vs Bridgewater State (13-6) win 

BC vs Boston University (10-4) win 

BC vs UCONN (4-3) win 

BC vs Trinity (10-3) win 

Sept. 24: at Bridgewater State 

BC vs Bridgewater State (17-2) win 

BC vs Boston University (5-5) tie 

Sept. 26: at Boston College 

BC vs Williams (5-4) win sudden death 

BC vs Dartmouth (7-2) win 

Oct. 6 & 7: Division II Tournament at 

UCONN 
BC vs Bridgewater State (12-3) win 
BC vs Boston University (6-5) win 
BC vs UCONN (14-7) loss 



BC vs URI (15-12) win 

Oct. 11: at Boston University 

BC vs Boston University (11-8) loss 

Oct. 20 & 21: Division II Tournament at 

Bridgewater State 
BC vs Boston University (12-8) win 
BCvs UCONN (13-12) win 
BC vs URI (9-7) loss 
BC vs Bridgewater State (18-8) win 
Oct. 26: at Boston College 
BC vs Coast Guard (13-7) win 
Nov. 3 &. 4: New England Championships 

at Brown University 
BC vs Williams (14-5) loss 
BC vs URI (15-10) loss 
BC vs Amherst (8-5) loss 
FINAL RECORD 14-6-1 




Supplement / 453 




Hockey 





After BC came back to oust Minne- 
sota in an exciting two-game total goal 
series, it was Final Four time in Detroit for 
the Eagles. Providence was their foe 
and BC had beaten this team twice 
already. There was one problem. A 
goaltender named Chris Terreri was on 
fire and his play brought the two teams 
to overtime. An exciting and nerverack- 
ing second overtime was ended when 
Providence scored and ended BC's 
hopes for a national championship. One 
of BC's most successful season ended in 
a fourth place finish to give the hockey 
team as much respect as the football 
team. BC hockey returned to the 
forefront in 1985 and 1986 looked even 
more promising. 




454 / Supplement 




Photos by Ted Hanss 



Supplement / 455 



Basketball 



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hotos by Kelly Short 



456 / Supplement 



After Troy Bowers' desperation shot rolled out of 
the basket against Syracuse in the Big East tourney, 
BC fans were saying, "Wait 'til next year! "about the 
hoop team. But, thanks to an expanded NCAA 
tournament format, the Eagles once again found 
themselves in the midst of post-season excitement. 

The first-round saw the Eagles slip by Texas Tech, 
but BC's next opponent was heavily favored 
ACC foe Duke. BC fought from behind throughout 
the second half and managed to squeak out a 
one point victory over the Blue Devils. 

Memphis State and Keith Lee were next, and the 
Eagles were once again one step away from the 
Final 8. As in the previous game, the Eagles battled 
from behind, and with twelve ticks remaining on 
the clock, BC was actually in command with the 
ball and a tie game, But, the dream turned into a 
nightmare as the inbounds pass bounced off 
Roger McCready's foot and the Tiger's Andre 
Turner hit a skyrocket jumper as time expired. The 
dream season was over and the aspirations of an 
all-Big East Final Four had gone by the wayside. 
Well, there was always next year. 



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The 1985 edition of the Boston College 
baseball had its ups and downs. The 
team endured a subpar season but 
highlighted the hitting by cracking 
many timely homeruns. The team was 
victorious in some Big East contests and 
looks forward to the strengths of Seton 
Hall and St. John's in 1986. 



H 



Supplement / 459 



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\Mornen 



460 / Supplement 






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Supplement / 461 




Photos by Geoff Why 



462 / Supplement 



MAUREEN CAMPANELLA 

Arts & Sciences 
AB Speech Communications 



ANN T. CAMPBELL 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Political Science 

Speech Communications 



KATHLEEN A. DALY 
School of Education 

AB Human Development 
Elementary Education 



DENYSE GONTHIER 

School of Management 

BS Marketing 



CHARLES GROGAN 
Evening School 
AB Accounting 




KATHLEEN KOHLER 

School of Education 

AB Elem-Special Education 



STEVEN J. LEE 

School of Management 

BS Accounting 




ARLENE M. SHOWSTACK 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Studio Art 



MARK J. WITKOWSKI 
Arts & Sciences 
BS Psychology 



The staff of Sub Turri apologizes to the 
seniors and patrons listed below who 
were not included in the main text. We 
thank you for your support of Sub Turri, 
the Yearbook of Boston College. Sub 
Turri would like to extend a special 
thanks to Chip Ryan for helping design 
and create the cover of the main text. 



JOHN L LENNON 

Arts & Sciences 

BS Geology 

Geophysics 



CONSTANCE M. PARKER 

Arts & Sciences 

AB Studio Art 



BARBARA SHEA 

School of Management 

BS Acconting 



GOLD BENEFACTOR 


Mr. and Mrs. Richard T. Riguzzi 


PATRONS 


Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Healy 


Mr. and Mrs. G. Wells 


Martin and Rita Healey 


Anderson 


Dr. and Mrs. F.H. Hinnendael 


j Daniel Button 


Mr. and Mrs. Paul Kulas 


Mr. and Mrs. Matthew T. 


The Daniel J. Looney Family 


Conlon 


Mr. and Mrs. Walter M. 


Mr. and Mrs. William L, 


Macek 


Conyngham 


Mr. and Mrs. David J. Murray 


Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Crawford 


Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. 


Mrs. James Cummings 


O'Brien 


Edward Daley 


Mr. and Mrs. William Parry 


Martin Dempsey 


Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Ramsey 


Mr. and Mrs. Jack H. Doyle 


Mr. and Mrs. J. Gregory Rice 


Mr. and Mrs. John P. Fahey, Jr. 


Mr. and Mrs. John R. Riley 


Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Ferreri 


and Family 


The Joseph Fitzpatrick Jr. 


Elizabeth W. Rowe 


! Family 


Dr. and Mrs. Eugene Smith 


Mr. and Mrs. Ronald J. 


Jim and Kathleen Smith and 


Frigerio 


Family 


Mr, and Mrs. A. Gaito 


Mrs. Karen Sullivan 


Mr. and Mrs. Donald J. Ghent 


Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. Troy 


Mr. and Mrs. Stephen J. 


Mr. and Mrs. John E. Walsh 


Gleba, Jr. 


Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Young 


Dick and Irene Goodwin 




Mr. and Mrs. John A. Gualtieri 





z 

o 



Supplement/ 463 




Thursday, May 9th 

Senior week had finally arrived after a 
week of final exams. There was no better 
way for seniors to start their last few days 
at BC then to attend their final Rat. This 
was no ordinary Rat. It consisted of just 
seniors. Underclassmen were not 
allowed in the door. 

The setting was very familiar, pretzels, 



beer, and of course, Good Stuff as the 
D.J. The floor was messy, the doors were 
closed at 8:45, but the atmosphere was 
different. For everyone, it was their last 
Rat as an undergrad at BC. The night 
ended on a happy note with everyone 
holding each other singing "Bye, Bye 
Miss America Pie." 



i 





Senior Night At The Rat 




464 / Supplement 



Tuesday, May 14th 

This activity was labeled 'Tacky 
Hawaiian Night." It was off to the Glenn 
Ellen Country Club in Millis for a Luau. It 
was a big, BC beach party inside. 
Everyone danced until the bitter end. 
The dance floor was overcrowded and 
the evening ended too soon. 
Friday, May 17th 

The highlight of the Clambake was 



find lunch on the table upon their arrival. 
It included, what else, clam chowder 
and clamcakes. Many of the students 
spent the day playing volleyball, horse- 
shoes, frisbee or softball. The lazier ones 



™wc ujicc|j in ii ic aui i. oupptsr was 

served promptly at 7 PM. The appetizer 
was steamers — all you could eat, 
followed by lobster or chicken with stuff- 
ing, onions, fish, and watermelon. The 



traveling, most students were excited to band era music. 






Luau/Clam 



Photos 



by Kerstin Gnazzo and Marianne McManama 



Supplement / 465 





The 

Nowhere 

Cruise 



Friday-Saturday, May 10th-11th 

WHAT, a 24 hour booze cruise for 
$75? Many people chose not to 
attend this Senior week activity be- 
cause they thought it was a 24 hour 
booze cruise for $75. Well, those who 
thought that were wrong. Those who 
went were in for a big surprise. The first 
comments out of people's mouths 
were, "This is the Love Boat." Before 
one boarded the ship, his picture was 
taken. So much for spending time in 
Portland, Maine. Nova Scotia, here 
we come. 

Each person was assigned a 
cabin. Some were priviledged and 
had showers while others just had 
sinks. The cabins weren't big enough 
for 4 people, let alone 5. Once 
everyone settled in, the partying 
began. Beer was only a dollar and 
most students had at least 6. Once 
the boat was sailing, the slot 
machines were humming while some 
seniors tried their luck at Black Jack or 
craps. Entertainment was provided 
by comedians from the Commedy 
Connection, Mark Timmons, and Mr. 
Mayor. 

Twenty-four hours was too short. The 
deck was covered with people 
Saturday catching the rays or 
recovering from a hangover. It took 
about 10 hours after the cruise was 
over before rooms stopped swaying. 




466 / Supplement 





\ 



( 



Monday, May 13th 

The twenties were in for this Senior 
Week activity. Most students took the 
buses provided from BC to Castle Hill at 
Crane's Beach in Ipswich. Some even 
took the pleasure route on Lincoln's bus 
which had a flat tire and broke down on 
the way in Burlington. 

On arrival, cameras were out and in 
full force. Everyone took in the gorgeous 
view of the beach. Hors d'oeuvres were 
served. They included an assortment of 
cheese, crackers, peanuts, sand- 
wiches, and even, shrimp. Once stom- 
achs were full, the dance floor was 
packed. The DJ played top 40 songs, 
plus a few songs from the 20's. The eve- 
ning was topped off with a spectacular 
fireworks show which lit up the sky for 
miles. 




Commencement Ball 




Thursday, May 16th 

Commencement Ball was one of the 
main romantic highlights of the week. It 
was a long-standing Senior Week tradition. 
This was the only formal activity to be held 
during the week. It was held at the 
Sheraton in downtown Boston. Those in 
attendance were charmed by Lester Lanin 
and his 15-piece orchestra, who had 
played at the wedding of Prince Charles 
and Lady Diana. They played both current 
tunes and oldies. The evening began with 
cocktails, followed by an average tasting 
meal, and continued into the night with 
dancing. 




470 / Supplement 



^^^^^^^■^^^^■i 




Photos by Peter Klidaras 



Supplement / 471 



Senior 

Parents 

Reception 




472 / Supplement 




The Senior/Parents Reception had be- 
come one of the traditional Senior Week 
events. It was attended by students, 
parents, and staff who enjoyed an 
evening of eating and dancing. This 
was an activity in which most students 
thanked the people who helped them 
most. 




Photos by Andy Ryan 



Supplement / 473 



Faces of the Class of '85 







474 / Supplement 



An Exceptional Class 




Photos by Peter Klidaras and Andy Ryan 



Supplement / 475 




476 / Supplement 




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